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2006 Toyota Corolla S Performance Mods

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HamMan: Hey guys, I’m new here. I just got a 2006 Corolla S (auto)(1zz-FE) and I am looking for performance modifications. I would eventually want to convert to All-Wheel drive and a 6-speed manual and boost. But are there any smaller things curently available such as springs, flywheels, cams? I have not been able to find anything on the net yet. Also, is it the same engine as the 2000-2003 Celica GT? if it was, I should be able to use celica GT engine mods. Thanks for your help!
December 20, 2006

fishexpo101

It is similar to the Celica GT engine - but only in a general sense. Most bolt ons are interchangeable from early 2003-2005 Corollas to the 2006 models - but not all. There has been some changes with the induction system (DBW vs throttle cables) and ECM interface (moved from ISO protocol to CAN protocols). As with other 1ZZ-FE - tuning items are limited. Most bolt ons will help with a little bit of gain here and there - but don't expect too much. The engine is already tuned out of the factory - any sizeable gains will come with great expense and modifications (ie. engine management, forced induction, internal mods, etc.).

 At most - you can get a 10-15WHP boost with what is available out there now and a reasonable cost (intake, exhaust). There are performance cams from Crower for the 1ZZFE, lightweight/underdrive pulleys for a Celica would work - but I don't recommend them unless you want to buy another engine soon, suspension for the 9th gen is already out there, flywheel - more of a personal choice. I'd prefer a strong steel one to a lightweight aluminum variant - aluminum ones have great throttle response, but the real key is getting the power down, smoothly to the ground.

 Are you serious about going AWD? I can see swapping in a 6-speed and turboing the engine - but for AWD, unless you have a machine shop, not viable (cost wise). Only way I could see this working out is getting a Celica All-Trac - cutting the body off and mounting the new Corolla body shell to it (actually done with a Celica GT-4 and a 7th gen Celica to the tune of $250K - a joint TRD/Millen project car).

 You would have much better luck enhancing the handling aspects of the car than the power aspects, as the Corolla takes suspension modifications exceptionally well.

Bitter

if you have an auto then you dont have a flywheel. for the auto try a higher stall converter with a higher ratio.

JeremyH

What suspension modifications are out there for recent Corollas? I love working on suspensions and am sure my wife wouldnt mind her car handling a little better.

fishexpo101

Most common mods are wheels/tires, performance springs and struts, and strut tower braces. Even with a simple tire change - the Corolla's handling can be greatly improved. Couple that with a decent spring/strut combination (don't have to get extreme lowering setup, unless you want to) - car feels totally different. On my Corolla - originally ran a PLUS+2 tire and wheel upgrade with OEM suspension. Handling and braking improved dramatically. Coupled that with TRD springs and a slight upgrade in struts - even better. Eventually went with a PLUS+0 tire and wheel combo (reduced unsprung mass) without too much tradeoff in overall handling.

 For the 9th gen Corollas - there is pretty good support in aftermarket for suspension upgrades. Everything from mild strut upgrades and performance springs (not too extreme drop, only around an inch) all the way to electronically controlled struts (damping levels) to full coilover assemblies.

HamMan:

Thanks for the help! to add on to the suspension question. I have also looked for coilovers(non-adjustable for cost-wise) and I have not been able to find any. I've checked Bilstein,H&R, ebach and cant find anything(except for some H&R lowering springs)?? Thanks again
December 21, 2006

fishexpo101

I've never heard of non-adjustable coilovers, unless you mean just plain springs. In that case, there should be a hefty assortment out there - just depends on what you are looking for: retain ride quality, trade comfort for performance, something that lowers the car mildly or aggressively, etc.

 Just for example - TEIN makes excellent springs for the 9th gen Corolla - H.Tech (mild drop, smooth ride), S.Tech (more drop, harder ride), SS Dampers ("real" adjustable coil-overs, soft as stock or full race stiffness). Others are Eibach Pro, H&R, Hotchkis, and more - struts from Koni, Tokico, and KYB are also available. A place to check is Tirerack:

 http://www.tirerack.com/suspension/Susptab...=&brand=all

 They usually have a good selection at reasonable prices, most of the suspension items are close to retail pricing - still a good price comparison, since if anyone else sells the same stuff for more, then you know that is way too much and you can keep shopping.

gvr4ever

I would not try and AWD your corolla. You would double the cost of your car. Trade your car in for a Subie if you want AWD. Probably the best thing you can do for hookup is to add LSD to your transmission. I don't have a link right now, but I did find a JDM LSD (with no warranty). It was a little pricey, but on top of that, you have to find someone good enough to install it. Unless you can do it yourself.

 As far as power goes, I gave up waiting for a TRD SCer kit. It sounds like they stopped making them after DBW throttles. Aside from a intake and exhaust work and maybe headers, one thing that I am sort of interested in is seeing if a Celica GT 140HP ECU would be a direct drop in without having to do anything else to the car. I haven't found out for sure if the Celica had DBW in it's last year, or if all the sensors and fuel injectors are the same. I haven't done a ton of homework on it. I'm either going to change cars after our bumper to bumper warranty runs out, or keep the Corolla for the long haul. I haven't decided yet.

hackish replied:

If you're planning to go boosted then don't waste money on an aluminum crank pulley. Most engines need the factory damping and with boost the harmonics on the crank are greatly exagerated. I've seen more than one 300+hp honda engine explode an oil pump from this. At stock power levels the harmonics are usually manageable but as soon as you start making significant gains you run into problems.

December 23, 2006

HamMan replied to HamMan's topic in General Corolla

Yeah, thanks I've recently heard about people blowing whole motors doing that. I have one more question. What is the little black box underneath the rear side of the back of the car it's slightly behind the fuel tank and in front of the spare tire well? Could it be the ECU or fuel device of dome sort?
January 2, 2007

kadaboon

I have the 2003-S model. I want to do minor upgrades like new clutch kit and fly wheel cuz the length of my clutch feels like 2-3ft and I could use a little bit more power, between 20-30HP. So what should I do and from who to get the parts from.

fishexpo101

You could start with the usual bolt on affair - intake, header, exhaust - together with a decent clutch and your choice of lightweight aluminum (like Fidanza) or stronger moly steel variant (TRD) - might be able to make 20HP. To get more - a TRD S/C would make the perfect solution. Factory backed performance, bolt on and low maintenance and adds about 60ish in HP and TQ.

 

Also see: 2007 Corolla S Performance Modifications and Supercharging ’06?