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Bull6791

Fluid Question

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One is the compliance standard, the refers to the end user product. JWS 3309 compliance is what makes it Toyota Type T-IV ATF compatible, but saying it is Toyota Type T-IV ATF does not automatically mean that it is JWS 3309 compliant. JWS 3309 is the spec that the oil should be at, so many manufacturers can follow this spec. Doesn't always mean that you can use a Toyota Type T-IV ATF in a Volvo or Chevy if they say JWS 3309 compliance required. There are enough differences in the finished product that can cause issues with other manufacturers. In most cases - the differences are minimal and nothing to worry about. But I don't want to allude to that, as I've seen enough cases where a small variance can completely kill a component. Best to stick with the manufacturer recommends - if you want to sway from this, completely up to you, but you have to own up to any issues down the road.

 

Toyota Type T-IV ATF is known to have a medium level of friction modifiers, you can find other aftermarket oils that also have a medium level of friction modifiers, but they can be completely unusable in the Toyota transaxle. Problem is, they won't tell you what the actual level of friction modifiers and/or additives you need - that's why there is the spec. If they state the spec and the product they are compatible with - you should be OK. If they don't state the spec but say it should work - wrong answer.

 

Aisin Warner (Aisin AW) is the parent manufacturer of the Toyota transaxle (combination of Aisin Seiki and BorgWarner transmission manufacturers). Toyota has more than 1 50% state in Aisin AW - so they are the sole source manufacturer for pretty much all the current Toyota transaxles/transmissions. Since it is listed under Aisin on the tech sheet, in this instance, the fluid is likely compatible with your car. Little confused why they didn't list it under Toyota - but that could have been a typo or oversight.

 

Best thing to do is find out if this "IS" the fluid that they put in or not. Just stating they are using Wolf's Head universal synthetic ATF is not enough information - as the online spec sheet might be for a completely different oil.

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I do not use that mechanic and his shop any more. When I had my trans flushed at 77,000 the work order only said synthetic transmission fluid. On Monday I e-mailed the mechanic which is also the owner to see what trans fluid they used. His exact answer was.

We only use WOLFS HEAD synthetic fluid.

I did not know Aisin warner had anything to do with toyota.

Maybe it is JWS 3309 compliant and like you said they typed it in the wrong spot.

I tried to call them but have not got a hold of any one.

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At this point - no sense worrying about it and just drive on.

 

Whenever you plan on getting the transaxle serviced next - just have it flushed out and the appropriate fluid pumped in its place. Same with the Coolant. If this is something that is really bothering you - setup up an appoint ASAP to have everything flushed out, right fluids put in - that way you know the fluids are correct.

 

This is precisely why forums like these exist - help owners trying to take on some simple DIY tasks so that they can change their own fluids. Do it yourself, and you'll know exactly what went in the car. Generally have no control over other shops unless you provide them with the fluids up front. Even then, the quality of work may be questionable. DIY first - if you screw something up - then you can go to the garage.

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For a tansmission fluid flush I wanted to know where do they do the INLET PUMP TYPE FLUSH. Do they do that at the dealer or some where else. Thanks.

 

Coolant flush: when doing this I want to look at drain water that comes out from the flushed coolig system Amd see if there are any chunks in there.

What are these chunks from rust.

Thanks Frank

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Depends the shop and their equipment - some shops will have this sort of machine, some do not. You'll have to ask. You can tell if shop uses this type because they can only attach it to the transaxle after removing the transmission pan and pulling the filter of. This is the key - most common machine is the cooler line flusher, where they don't even touch the pan. You want them to drop the pan - need to clean off the bottom of the pan and the magnets. Note how much slurry is on the bottom, then the next time you change the fluid - see how those deposits increased/decreased. Just by the nature of the transaxle, there will be some deposits on the bottom - all part of normal wear and tear. Where you have to worry is there is a LOT of stuff on the bottom or large chunks. You'll know if you see it - if it will be a problem or not.

 

If the shop doesn't have this sort of machine or you can find any reputable shop that has this - they can do a cooler line flush - but make sure they drop the pan, clean it, and replace the transaxle filter. You can also DIY - lots of videos online that walk you through a couple of ways to do it.

 

The one to stay away from is the transaxle filler tube machine - lots of transaxles ended up acting weird or flat out dying afterwards. Many of these setups want to run a "cleaner" through first - do NOT opt to do that. You want to drain out the old oil - not add more "stuff" in an effort to get the old fluid out.

 

Coolant flush - if the coolant is not compatible, you'll see debris suspended in the coolant (makes the coolant look cloudy) and there might be debris that is flushed out (looks like sand or mud). Might even see chunks of rubber (looks like rubbery sand). Shouldn't see any rust particles - the system is aluminum and plastic - water jacket of the engine is all aluminum. Same way with the transaxle, many of these setups want to run a "cleaner" through first - again, do NOT opt to do that. You want to drain out the old coolant - not add more "stuff" in an effort to get the old fluid out. Water used to top off the system, get it to the right concentration is distilled water. No tap water here, as the minerals will deplete the additive package faster - some cases, you might accidentally introduce a biological element to the coolant, don't need that.

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Do you think dealership does INLET PUMP TYPE FLUSH. I was going to try them first.

 

 

My old mechanic is also the owner. He did computerized coolant flush. The next day when I was low on coolant I went back and he filled it. He asked me before he filled it does it take Toyota red/pink. I said pink. He filled it up. Looking through plastic bottle it looks pink but come to find out he put in TURBO POWER EXTENDED LIFE /150,000 miles ORANGE. He also said actually my car could take any coolant except the green.

He also said they came out with different color coolant so you could tell what coolant is for what manufacturer.

When I flush coolant I am going to put in TOYOTA RED. Also when I flush trans I am going to put in TOYOTA T-IV

Frank

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You'll have to ask - not all dealerships have this sort of flushing machine.

 

You're old mechanic is almost right - most generic green coolant is generally not spec'd for your Corolla, but cannot just look at the color. The color has nothing to do with what manufacturer the coolant was formulated for - that is completely incorrect information. You can get coolant that can be appropriate for use in your Corolla that is red, pink, yellow, orange, purple or even green in color. Color is not the deciding factor, the additive package and chemistry is what you want to check on.

 

You're on the right track - if in doubt, unsure of what is good for the car, fluid wise - always run the OEM recommended fluids. Can never go wrong with those. Later on, once you get some DIY experience under your belt and pickup information on various fluids - you might want to experiment down the road.

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Fish

I never had pan dropped before so when I get trans flushed do you think it is a good idea to replace gasket and filter.

It's going to be hard but I will try to find a shop that does INLET PUMP TRANS FLUSH. When it's flushed I will put Toyota T -IV fluid in.

What coolant do you use TOYOTA RED/pink. After coolant flushed I want to put in coolant you use.

Fish I am flushing coolant my self. This will be my first time ever.

The coolant you use when do you replace it. Every how many miles.

Thanks Frank

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If the pan will be dropped - always a good idea to replace the gasket and replace the filter. Pan is already going to be off, might as well replace the filter while it is accessible.

 

Like I mentioned, if you can't find a shop that will do it or has the equipment - a cooler line flush will be OK, just make sure they take the pan off to clean and replace the filter. Make sure that you can either see them take the pan off, or provide you with the old parts. Unless it is warranty work - you can always as for the old parts back by law.

 

My 2002 Corolla - I use Toyota Red - in the others, I plan on running either red or pink. Pink is already prediluted - so it can be a challenge to get all the water out of the system in order to maintain the correct concentration - but it is doable. Which one you should use - up to you and what you can find at a dealership. From what I gather - it can be hard to find Toyota Red now that all Toyotas have switched over to the premixed pink stuff.

 

Per spec:

 

From ORIGINAL Factory FILL:

Toyota Red = 50K miles, 36 months

Toyota Pink = 100K miles, 120 months

 

For subsequent drains and refills:

Toyota Red - 30K miles, 24 months

Toyota Pink - 60K miles, 60 months

 

I generally try to stick to that schedule to avoid any issues, but many other owners have commented that these can be considered somewhat on the conservative side. I've flushed and refilled with Toyota Red at 36K mile intervals (2 years for me) - with zero issues. The Matrix was recently switched to Toyota Red - plan is to follow the same schedule as the Corolla, or switch to Toyota Pink down the road. It is actually weeping coolant by the water pump, so I'll keep an eye on that. My Rav4 is still running the original fill. Won't worry about that until it gets closer to 100K miles. No weeping like the Matrix - knock on wood.

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Fish

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/132-9th-gen-corolla-1st-gen-matrix-2003-2008/325325-diy-2003-2008-corolla-matrix-vibe-transmission-fluid-strainer-replacement.html

Would this be a good Trans fluid flush for me to follow if I was doing it my self or do you have something better

Also once I do a coolant flush and get rid of the old TURBO POWER coolant I never have to worry about a flush again. After coolant flush i put in red coolant and then from that point forward I just have to do drain and refills. Am I correct.

Frank.

Edited by Bull6791

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Yup - that would be pretty much exactly how I'd do it. That write up is pretty decent - he has a lot of good tips in there, so read though it carefully.

 

Note: This DIY flush process can be pretty messy - just have plenty of paper towels/rags around. Lay down some cardboard to help ward off spills, as there will be some ATF spills. Definitely need a helper with that method, makes it a LOT easier to do. In comparison, this will be similar to how the inlet pump machine flusher works - just that you are using the onboard transaxle pump to move the fluid. With the shop - all the lines and new and recovered fluids are contained in one spot - so they can complete the job relatively spill free and dispense/recover the oil efficiently.

 

Correct - once you flush out the other coolant, you'd only have to do drains and refills, you don't have to flush it out unless you want to. Simple procedure of draining the system and refilling with the same amount that drained out. Any remaining coolant will have the additive package buffered by the new coolant. Since they are the same chemistry, they wont' "fight" each other and deplete the additives out.

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I think those machines go for anywhere from $4000 to $8000, depending on features and size. Definitely not something a home owner needs, unless you plan on building a business out of it. Service time is about an hour, and they can go through 12-20+ quarts of ATF -depending on the car and how sludged up they are.

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I can't recommend any pump for the home owner - they were never designed for that in mind. They are all commercial in design - the amount of maintenance and infrastructure they need would be more than what most people want to deal with.

 

Best flush a homeowner can do is like the link you posted up. That will get you 99% of what those machines can do (clean oil wise) - just need more time / labor on your part.

 

Of course - they won't stop you from buying one. Any DIY can buy an SST, provided you have the funds - but you'll also need a pit in the garage or a car lift, to get the machine under the car - doesn't work if the machine and car are too level to each other - need that pressure differential.

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