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01 Corolla Burning Oil

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Great to know that Bent, thanks for explaining. I have been on corolla forums for years and that is the first I've heard the exact cause posted.

 

Sounds like the cheapest fix would be to use Auto RX to take care of the deposits and free up the rings. If that didn't work for whatever reason then the improved pistons would be next.

 

Do you have info or a link for those pistons so everyone here will know the brand or where to get them if they need new pistons? How much was your total cost parts/S&H/labor?

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Great to know that Bent, thanks for explaining. I have been on corolla forums for years and that is the first I've heard the exact cause posted.

 

Sounds like the cheapest fix would be to use Auto RX to take care of the deposits and free up the rings. If that didn't work for whatever reason then the improved pistons would be next.

 

Do you have info or a link for those pistons so everyone here will know the brand or where to get them if they need new pistons? How much was your total cost parts/S&H/labor?

 

The pistons are the stock ones(for any 1ZZ) toyota sells now.

 

I talked to the Toyota parts guy where I bought them, and he told me there had been a few revisions since 2000 and that I had the latest ones.

 

They look almost identical, except that the new ones have twice the number of holes and the holes are twice the diameter.

 

The pistons are the same diameter as the old ones, but a gram lighter( probably from the extra material removed for the oil holes).

 

The old ones had two 1/16" holes on either side ( 4 total).

 

The new ones have four 1/8" holes either side ( 8 total) .

 

The set of pistons were $225 and rings $100.

 

Look here for more info on the oil burning and new pistons: http://www.toyotanat...iston+oil+holes

 

I am doing a total rebuild on the engine ,so I orderd all the parts for the rebuild together, and I am doing the labor.

 

I bought my parts at http://www.toyotapartscenter.net/ overall( parts/ shipping) they had the best prices. The service was GREAT( ask for John).

 

Dont order on line( call the toll free #) if you can help it , you will get much better shipping prices if you talk to john direct.

 

Since I was ordering thousands of dollars worth of parts I shopped around at all the online Toyota parts stores. Some had cheaper parts but the "mystery"/ very high shipping costs stopped me from buying at those places.

Edited by bent rod

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Great to know that Bent, thanks for explaining. I have been on corolla forums for years and that is the first I've heard the exact cause posted.

 

Sounds like the cheapest fix would be to use Auto RX to take care of the deposits and free up the rings. If that didn't work for whatever reason then the improved pistons would be next.

 

Do you have info or a link for those pistons so everyone here will know the brand or where to get them if they need new pistons? How much was your total cost parts/S&H/labor?

 

If you do a little searching on the 8th gen Corolla forum on ToyotaNation.com, there is a great description of the new pistons with pics and part #s. The author's name is Sam3365 or something similar.

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i still don't understand why my corolla doesn't burn oil, not that im complainin. just saying, a 2000 corolla shouldn't have the cylinder improvement. i have never smelt burning oil or seen it and i floor it quite often too.

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Hit or miss it seems - some 1998-2002 Corollas don't burn any oil at all, others guzzle oil. Could it be the way the car was broken in? Or type of motor oil used? Oil filter choice? Oil change interval? Hard to say, so many variables are involved, be tough to pinpoint the true cause.

 

Still, there is a manufacturing change from the 8th gen to 9th gen 1ZZ-FE engines. If this was in response to oil consumption, we may never know for sure. The two generations 1ZZ-FE due operate differently - 9th gen transaxles are geared differently, revised camshaft profile, upgraded ECM - engines will turn more RPMs compared to the previous generation.

 

Doesn't mean that the 9th gen Corollas are immune to oil consumption - there are a number of threads out there where some 9th gen Corollas are guzzling as much oil as the 8th gen Corollas, even with the revised oil holes.

 

My 2002 is the same way - has a little more than 170K miles, bought when new. First 10K miles were on conventional motor oil (free oil changes from dealership promo), swapped to synthetic afterwards, and I drive the living tar out the car daily since. No babying the car, the car was designed to be drive, so I try and drive the lugnuts off. Mixed highway and city - commute in the DC Metro area, so some extreme driving conditions. Minimum of 80 miles a day for commutes - typically run between 15K-24K miles a year, depending on which car I take. Car presently doesn't burn any oil (knock-on wood). Car did loose a few ounces of oil when the timing chain tensioner gasket leaked, but hasn't lost a drop after that was replaced.

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I should have said " toyota says the fix is" because I dont think that is the whole problem either.

 

What is the cheapest mod / band-aid Toyota can do ? Drill holes in the piston .

 

Do I really beleive that I can use any oil , any oil change interval, any driving habits I want now because of the modified pistons ?

 

NO

 

There are to many variables( engine design being one) , but I think the oil holes will help the problem.

 

I wont use dino oil in my rebuilt engine, except for break in. These engines do not do well with dino oil!

 

I laughed when I read my 2000 owners manual( bought the car new) and it said oil changes every 5000 miles.

 

I have used dino oil from day one,( 3000 mile interval always) and did not have a problem untill around 100,000 and then suddenly started to burn alot more oil( 1 quart every 1000 miles) between oil changes switched to Rotella and in about 6000 it came back down to normal( less than 1/2 quart every 3000).

 

Did the Rotell help ? It seemed to, but I dont really know for sure.

 

When I pulled my engine apart it was fairly clean, no stuck rings , oil holes in piston were open, no sludge, just a thin coat of "varnish".

 

I would like to know if any of these engines that have run synthetic oil from the begining, have oil burning problems( with regular oil changes ,I would guess no).

 

Fishexpo, I read that you have taken apart some oil burners. How were the rings, piston oil holes ?

 

I have only seen one post with pictures that show an oil burner with the rings clearly stuck.

 

I have read alot about wrong sized pistons , rings ect. I did not find that in my engine. All the mesurements were in line with the manual, given wear.

Edited by bent rod

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I've only played with one 1ZZ-FE that was a known oil burner, and a few more that were not - most of the oil burners involved a bunch of non-Toyota imports and mainly domestic ones (one Ford Taurus 3.0L V-6, older Quad-4 motors, Saturn 1.9L SOHC/DOHC, GM V-6, GM V-8, older carburated SB/BB GM and Mopar SB/BB/Slant6 engines, BMW, DSM, and Hondas).

 

That 1ZZ-FE for the most part - looked like it was in good shape, aside from consuming an excessive amount of oil (1 quart @ 150 miles). It didn't have any outward signs of being a oil burner - sludge, obviously scored or out of round cylinder walls (polished smooth), hard carbon deposits, etc. Some residue on the bumper, but it didn't smoke at all from the exhaust. Topend of the engine looked good - nice golden color, no heavy deposits, no big chunks or patches of sludge anywhere. It actually looked cleaner than my own engine (my pics on photobucket site in my sig - but that was probably all the additives this guy was adding to the oil to clean up the engine.

 

Looking at the piston, fair amount of carbon deposits (typical for an oil burner), rings did look good, though some were broken (oil ring side rails), which surprised me. Oil control ring (expander ring) looked OK, was still loose and was pretty flimsy - but not sure if they all are like that. Rings were not stuck, some deposits in the ring lands, but nothing that looked like it would compromise the specs. Before the engine got torn down - compression test showed it was still good 185PSI+ each cylinder. Plugs were toast after 6 or 7 months - about 5K-8K miles tops before they were completely clogged with ash and oil fouled.

 

Unfortunately, didn't take any pics - as there the engine cleaned prior to it being pulled down. You name it - it probably was run through the engine. AutoRx, Seafoam, MMO, Rislone, Gunk, BG products, Rotella, ATF, diesel, etc. So the real culprit probably got "washed" away. Be nice to get a hold of an engine that is consuming an excessive amount of oil, but had nothing done to it other than topping off the oil level. Then on teardown - should be able to spot the problem.

 

Since many have reported a sudden switch to heavy oil consumption, especially when the mileage starts hitting 100K+, I'll just wait it out and see if it my car starts too. But since I used only synthetics and monitor my oil with UOAs, I'll probably be waiting for some time.

 

Yup, 5000 miles changes - and that was when they lowered it too - used to be longer. The book in my '96 Camry recommended 7500 mile intervals on conventional oil for normal driving conditions. We stuck with that interval and only recently dropped it to 5K on high mileage oil because of the miles on it (switched to 5K drain intervals when the car had 280K miles on it and started to use 1/2 quart of oil between the 7500 mile intervals). Now it drinks a few ounces between the 5K intervals, but has more than 300K miles on it.

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Fish do you prefer a company for UOA's over others and if so who are they? I've seen people have bad experiences with some companies getting samples mixed up between customers and loosing samples.

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Blackstone labs has been good to me. www.blackstone-labs.com

 

I haven't gotten any mixed up reports, funky test results yet. You also get the technician's comments on what they see in the sample and their recommendations - ie, a person is doing it instead of a machine loading samples. I also send in two samples at a time - get the results within days - some cases I get the results within 48 hours of sending the sample via USPS.

 

Standard analysis is $25, TBN is another $10 - so it is not the cheapest UOA shop out there - but if I send in only 4 samples a year max - not really a big deal to save a few bucks here or there, since I know I'll get good service and fast turn around time on the results.

 

Plus you can order the sample containers for free - takes 1-2 weeks to ship them to you.

Edited by fishexpo101

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As Fish has said, its hit or miss on oil consumption with this generation of Corolla. Some develop the problem at some point, others never due.

 

My initial approach to the problem involving some hands on stuff, after getting good feedback here from Fish and a couple others: I bought the repair manual, replaced my air filter, cleaned the throttle body and butterfly valve with throttle body cleaner, cleaned the MAF sensor with contact cleaner, and replaced my gummed up 10 year old factory PCV valve.

 

With the mechanical stuff done, I began to explore methods to clean the engine and upper cylinder, reduce wear, and reduce oil consumption. After some research I settled on:

 

- Penzz Platinum 5W30 oil with 10% MMO added as a catalyst to safely clean the engine over time. PP, being a good synthetic, has the added value of reducing start up wear due to its very good cold flow properties that allow it to begin circulating and lubricating faster than conventional alternatives (this is a big bonus in the coming cold winter);

 

- use of PEA based fuel system cleaner at 5,000 km intervals for combustion chamber cleaning, followed by the use of upper cylinder lubricants that (theoretically) have the potential to free the rings by reducing deposits and lubricating the upper cylinder they glide along during the power stroke. My regimen is Regane for the PEA cleaner (one treated tank every 5,000 km), followed by 3 or 4 MMO treated tanks, and then TC-W3 two stroke oil (at a 500:1 mixture) in each tank of fuel until the next Regane cycle is due. MMO is thought to be a little stronger on the solvency side, and TC-W3 a little better on the lubrication side. Both have properties of each, and I view them as complementary, although I use them independently (that is, I don't treat a tank with both additives at the same time; instead I cycle them as outlined above);

 

- most recently, I added Lubro Moly mos2 to my oil: half a bottle initially, with one quarter bottle maintenance treatments to follow. Moly is an 'old school' additive and also a component in many (maybe all) piston ring designs. Amounts in modern PCMOs (passenger car motor oil) varies from little to none. The only oil I know that still contains significant amounts of moly is Redline, although its expensive. LM mos2 is an inexpensive additive that ups the moly count in your oil while changing no properties of it otherwise. Its called an 'anti-wear' additive as it works by plating itself to the metals present in pistons, cylinder walls, rings etc. This fills in pores and provides a lubricating film that reduces wear. As consumption in our 8th gen burners is due to failure of the oil control rings from ring "stick" and wear, mos2 shows promise in addressing both issues directly.

 

My approach is atypical and largely theoretical: its based on the known cause and treatment aimed directly at correcting or fixing the cause using products that show promise in this area, but for which potential results are mainly theory based (though this is also backed by anecdotal reports from others with consumption due to the same cause having reported success at reducing or eliminating it using each of these methods independently).

 

None of these methods work immediately or over night. Just like it took many thousand miles for the oil consumption problem to develop, some amount of time has to be allowed for when choosing methods like this that are aimed at the source of the problem, but take time for their potential effects to show measurable results.

 

The first of these measures (the OC to PP) was done 3,000 km ago, and MMO was added to the oil 2,000 km ago. Likewise, the additives mentioned have been introduced at different points, with mos2 being the most recent addition (about 500 km ago). I have recently observed reduction in consumption, but its too early to verify or measure. I will report back though when I have numbers to give. Note too that, as I indicated these measures take time to work, I am planning to continue with this method right til Spring without introducing any changes or further additives; although I may add an additional 8 ounces of MMO to the oil after temperatures go below freezing, to increase the concentration from 10% to somewhere closer to 15%. Meantime I will simply continue this regimen and track the results. I have additional ideas in mind as well too, but I prefer to give this approach some time to work, and to measure the results, before trying anything else.

 

Edit: I will add that after, probably something on the order of hundreds of hours spent researching the problem, potential solutions, and discussions with others having this issue (including many who have had success at correcting the problem and significantly reducing, or eliminating consumption), that though I have not mentioned every single possible method in this post that may reduce consumption, including the future ones I am considering after the current experiment has been given sufficient time to evaluate, that I am skeptical of the utility of Auto RX in correcting this particular problem. Very skeptical (to the point that I personally view it as an over-priced product with limited utility and whose results can be achieved through other, more cost effective measures). I will not be using it. My two cents on ARX. YMMV.

 

-Spyder

Edited by Spyder

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Edit: I will add that after, probably something on the order of hundreds of hours spent researching the problem, potential solutions, and discussions with others having this issue (including many who have had success at correcting the problem and significantly reducing, or eliminating consumption), that though I have not mentioned every single possible method in this post that may reduce consumption, including the future ones I am considering after the current experiment has been given sufficient time to evaluate, that I am skeptical of the utility of Auto RX in correcting this particular problem. Very skeptical (to the point that I personally view it as an over-priced product with limited utility and whose results can be achieved through other, more cost effective measures). I will not be using it. My two cents on ARX. YMMV.

 

-Spyder

 

I was ready to try ARX not too long ago but recently decided to hold off. There was a thread on BITOG about a 1zz-fe engine that basically grenaded after the ARX treatment because the OCV screen/filter got really gummed up with deposits. Two days ago I checked out my own screen. Although it looked clean, there were definitely solid deposits on the threaded part of the head that I'm sure weren't helping things. The oil that dribbled out looked much nastier than the stuff coming out of the pan, too. It made me nervous about using a more aggressive treatment.

 

Generally speaking, I've taken a slightly different approach to consumption. For 40,000+ miles I just topped up whatever dino I had in the crankcase--really not an approach at all. Consumption slowly got worse so I decided to try something different. About 4-5,000 miles and 9 months ago, I switched to Valvoline syn blend MaxLife (the cheaper one) and it reduced consumption fairly dramatically. 1 qt/400 miles to 1 qt./800 by the time I was done with the 3,000 mile OCI. My last OCI was 1,000 miles of Castrol GTX High Mileage, which kept consumption steady at 1 qt./800-900 miles. I burned only slightly over a quart during that time but ran out of GTX and didn't bother buying more. In the meantime I bought Rotella T5 10w-30 (another syn blend), which is what I put in a couple of days ago. Hopefully the consumption will stay the same or improve. If it doesn't, I may go back to Valvoline.

 

About 700 miles into the Castrol OCI, I did the MMO piston soak, put the rest of the bottle in the crankcase and gas tank, and let that go for the last 300 miles or so. I have no idea if it really did anything.

 

In general I'm pretty happy with using the cheaper oils because I have seen some decent improvement. Granted, burning 1 qt. every 800-900 miles isn't great, but I don't drive very much either. I've driven almost 50,000 miles with this oil burner, so I'm not too worried about it. For now, Rotella T5 it is, and I will probably buy another gallon jug for topping up to give it some time.

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Spyder I searched Bitog for that thread but I couldn't find it. Would you be able to locate it from memory of the thread title and post the link so we could read it?

 

Since you have found reason to avoid ARX then what are the other solutions you have found in your mentioned research that eliminated oil consumption for people? The only one that I know of for certain is the updated piston.

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I'm not sure which link you're looking for, but there are threads on Lubro Moly mos2 in the oil additives and VOA sections (no more than 2 or 3 pages deep) on BITOG. Within the first couple pages of fuel additives section on BITOG you can everything you ever wanted to find out about different upper cylinder lubricants (UCLs), including MMO and TC-W3, the ones I mentioned in earlier posts.

 

I don't think ARX is effective because the problem is upper cylinder related, and in my opinion ARX is not the most cost effective, or generally effective, route to go. If you do a search on BITOG for Molasoke and Molasoak you will find alternative approaches that I think are the most effective at direct, immediate results gains. You may have to repeat piston soaks several times before its effective - just because it doesn't reduce oil consumption on the first or second try, doesn't mean its not going to work.

 

My recommendation if going the piston soak route is to inject 2 ounces of MMO into each cylinder, and allow it soak 8 to 16 hours. Eject the MMO by cranking with the spark plugs out and a lint free cloth, placed loosely, to catch the residue placed, over the cylinders. Then follow it up with2 ounces of LC20 into the cylinder (the Molasoke) repeating the same process. Make sure to crank with plugs out to avoid hydrolock. Then start the engine, run it a few minutes to allow the oil to circulate, and then drain it and refill. Do a short OCI of 3k with something like PYB, and (optionally) add 12 ounces of MMO (to a 4 quart sump) for the last 1,000 miles of the OCI. Monitor the consumption throughout, but pay special attention to the first 2k; this is because MMO may slightly increase consumption over the last 1k if added (this is to be expected and not an indication of the method not working).

 

If oil consumption is stopped, repeat the process, evaluate the results. Rinse, recylce, and see where you're at after three cycles (if needed). At that point, the problem is either cured or its time to move on to other measures.

 

The one I alluded to in my previous post, come spring, is that method outlined above exactly, although I'm substituting Quaker State dino for PYB, for those short OCIs. I'm also stepping my 3 season oil upto a 10W30 instead of a 5W30 as my research has shown me that, due to higher flash point, HTHS, and lower NOACK, it is more burn off resistant than 5W30. I will continue to use 5W30 for our winters.

 

If consumption is not satisfactor with this method, Lubro Moly motor oil saver shows promise and can be added to synthetic, dino, or HDEO oil. I would not add it to High Mileage oil like MaxLife, etc. If you're not comfortable going the piston soak route, this is a safe alternative as well that shows promise and is inexpensive. Lubro Moly products are available from Napa, among other places.

 

I check in here regularly but I'm also on BITOG a lot using Spyder7 as my user name; best bet to contact me is to shoot me a PM over there and I will be too happy to help in any way I can. This is a topic I discuss a lot over there on the boards, and via PM with other users in the same boat as us (some are Toyota owners, but not all).

 

This is the outline of my own approach, after much research and discussion with other members on BITOG, including things I'm doing now and future steps I plan to take after my winter experiment is over. I'm not selling a cure to the problem, but if anything is going to work short of a rebuild, then this approach (from my research) promises to yield the best results as its aimed at the culprit deliberately, rather than using thick oil and or HM oil to mask the symptoms but ignore the cause.

 

-Spyder

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