Ngk Spark Plugs (ifr5a11 Same As "t"11)?

vurjt

New member
Are the NGK IFR5A11 spark plugs that the owner's manual lists and are currently in my 04 Corolla the same as NGK IFR5T11 that are sold at AutoZone? I can't find the "A'11 only the "T"11????

 

fishexpo101

I know Karate, Kung Fu, and 47 other dangerous wor
As far as gross differences - the two plugs are essentially the same - gapped at 0.044" and both are iridium long life plugs.

The 'T' designation is an OEM like replacement. Sometimes you cannot buy the 'exact' plugs unless you drop by the dealership. Performance would not be different - just a difference of OEM vs like OEM part. Same goes for the Denso variant - as both Iridium Denso SK16R11 or NGK IFR5A11 are listed in the manual as replacements for the vehicle.

Just like the OEM oil filter - even if you go to the dealership, they will not stock the 'exact' part number that was on the original component, but doesn't mean the running another OEM/OEM like component will be harmful.

Right now I run the NGK Iridium IX replacements in place of the the OEM plug - no difference in mileage or performance. Those Autozone plugs should be OK for your application. Also keep in mind that the plugs are usually good for 100K-120K miles in normal driving conditions. Unless they are heavily fouled or you have run up there in mileage - the originals should still be OK.

 

94 RoLLa DX

New member
I replaced my plugs the other day on my 94. I got the standard Denso plugs. They worked fine. $1.99 a plug.

Changing plugs on a Corolla is so easy, I love it.

 
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Bikeman982

Bikeman982
I replaced my plugs the other day on my 94. I got the standard Denso plugs. They worked fine. $1.99 a plug.
Changing plugs on a Corolla is so easy, I love it.
The hardest part is getting down the tube, since the plug itself is barely visible.

I would hate it if one of the plug hole threads got messed up.

 

gvr4ever

New member
I replaced my plugs the other day on my 94. I got the standard Denso plugs. They worked fine. $1.99 a plug.
Changing plugs on a Corolla is so easy, I love it.
The hardest part is getting down the tube, since the plug itself is barely visible.

I would hate it if one of the plug hole threads got messed up.
You can use a spark plug socket that holds the spark plug on the trip out and in. Also, hand start it with a extension and the threads won't get messed up. I don't break out the wrench until the spark plug is seated.

 

94 RoLLa DX

New member
Yeah, I have spark plug sockets that have the rubber boot. Also, that is good that you dont use the ratchet until the plug is started into the well. It is really important not to just start tightening the plug with the ratchet as soon as you start it.

 

Bikeman982

Bikeman982
I replaced my plugs the other day on my 94. I got the standard Denso plugs. They worked fine. $1.99 a plug.
Changing plugs on a Corolla is so easy, I love it.
The hardest part is getting down the tube, since the plug itself is barely visible.

I would hate it if one of the plug hole threads got messed up.
You can use a spark plug socket that holds the spark plug on the trip out and in. Also, hand start it with a extension and the threads won't get messed up. I don't break out the wrench until the spark plug is seated.
Good advice. It would be terrible if you stripped the threads.

I use NGK BKR5EYA spark plugs for my cars and they work well.

 
I replaced my spark plugs earlier in the year using over the counter item from Toyota parts department. Works great on 2003 CE with 1ZZ-FE enginee with over 299,999 miles! Now, I just need to replace 10-year old battery when it dies. lol.

 

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