Serpentine Belt For 1zzfe

twinky64

New member
How often should I replace my serpentine belt? How much should I expect it to cost if I have a mechanic do it? Is it an easy DIY job?

 

fishexpo101

I know Karate, Kung Fu, and 47 other dangerous wor
How often would depend on the driving conditions - some people can get anywhere from a lowside of 15K miles to as much as 100K. Usually you can tell by just looking at the belt. Little cracks in it are normal - but an excessive amount of cracks, missing chunks of rubber ribbing, or any portion of the cord backing showing itself - mean you need to change it out. I would also check on the condition of the belt tensioner as well - any play/slop or tightness/friction in the pulley assembly means you have to atleast change the pulley. Most mechanics will NOT check this - they just want to swap parts off the car.

For mechanics to do this - most will charge 30 minutes of "book time" - runs anywhere from $30-$75 for just labor + parts. Belt usually runs about $30 - the OEM piece is made by Bando, very good quality. Others are Gates, Dayco, and Goodyear - all very good ones as well. As for a DIY job - very easy to do. If you can change the oil - you can do this job. This has been mentioned on this forum many times before - biggest hurdle is remembering how the belt runs over or under the pulleys - many times there is a diagram on a placard under the hood, but taking a picture or making a diagram first is highly recommended.

 

twinky64

New member
How often would depend on the driving conditions - some people can get anywhere from a lowside of 15K miles to as much as 100K. Usually you can tell by just looking at the belt. Little cracks in it are normal - but an excessive amount of cracks, missing chunks of rubber ribbing, or any portion of the cord backing showing itself - mean you need to change it out. I would also check on the condition of the belt tensioner as well - any play/slop or tightness/friction in the pulley assembly means you have to atleast change the pulley. Most mechanics will NOT check this - they just want to swap parts off the car.
For mechanics to do this - most will charge 30 minutes of "book time" - runs anywhere from $30-$75 for just labor + parts. Belt usually runs about $30 - the OEM piece is made by Bando, very good quality. Others are Gates, Dayco, and Goodyear - all very good ones as well. As for a DIY job - very easy to do. If you can change the oil - you can do this job. This has been mentioned on this forum many times before - biggest hurdle is remembering how the belt runs over or under the pulleys - many times there is a diagram on a placard under the hood, but taking a picture or making a diagram first is highly recommended.
Does the belt tensioner look like a chain tensioner on a deraileur fixed on a mountain bike? If so, that means that you can physically pull back the tensioner and loosen the belt? I've pulled on the belt myself and that thing is very difficult to pull/stretch. The belt doesn't look like it has much "freeplay" or "stretch factor" sorta speak. A mechanic told me that squeaking belts can happen if the belt stretches too much over time, eventhough, cracks are nonexistent. Is he telling the truth?

 

fishexpo101

I know Karate, Kung Fu, and 47 other dangerous wor
Yes, that is a pretty good analogy.

As for the mechanic's comment - yes and no. For an older car with a V-belt - I'd say it is true. With the modern serpentine belt, not so much. Squeaking can happen from a stretched out belt - but that is why there is a belt tensioner there, to take up the slack and account for sudden movement that will shred a normal setup.

A squeaking belt is common issue on the 8th and 9th gen Corollas - most of the time, it is the tensioner pulley that is failing. Eventually, the bad tensioner will damage the belt. The belt tensioner has a false bolt above the real pivot point - will be real obvious when you look at it. Put a wrench on the "nut" and pull it back to release the tension. Slip the belt off - slip the new belt on, pull back on the tensioner to allow the belt to fit under the pulley, release tensioner and you are done. Fifteen minutes tops - hard part is routing the belt allong the pulleys in the correct order (not a problem if you made a diagram first).

 

the99contour

New member
How often should I replace my serpentine belt? How much should I expect it to cost if I have a mechanic do it? Is it an easy DIY job?
You have way over 100k on your car right? If I were you, I'd replace that sucker ASAP. If it breaks, you'll be sorry. Sure it isn't the timing chain, but it runs your PS, PB, ALT, AC and WP. You won't go very far with no coolant circulating through your engine block, and you'll have a hard time stopping and steering if you don't have PS and PB boost. Also, your battery will bite the dust, and need replacement if you run the car solely from the battery for very long.

 

twinky64

New member
How often should I replace my serpentine belt? How much should I expect it to cost if I have a mechanic do it? Is it an easy DIY job?
You have way over 100k on your car right? If I were you, I'd replace that sucker ASAP. If it breaks, you'll be sorry. Sure it isn't the timing chain, but it runs your PS, PB, ALT, AC and WP. You won't go very far with no coolant circulating through your engine block, and you'll have a hard time stopping and steering if you don't have PS and PB boost. Also, your battery will bite the dust, and need replacement if you run the car solely from the battery for very long.
Right, 200k. But I highly doubt its the original belt because there are no cracks or anything. I know its at least, at the very least, 50k. I say that because my 'rents gave the car to me 50k miles ago

 

fishexpo101

I know Karate, Kung Fu, and 47 other dangerous wor
On your model year - there is a serpentine belt that needs to be changed if there are an excessive amount of cracks on it or it is missing rubber ribs on the bottom. A few cracks on it is normal - but if we are talking about cracks every 1/4" inch - then that is too much.

No timing belt on your car - it uses a timing chain that should last the life of the car.

 

Bikeman982

Bikeman982
Anyone wanting to know when to change their car parts should consult their repair manuals. It will give you change intervals (mileage or time).

Preventive maintenance requires maintenance be performed, prior to needing it, to prevent high failure items from causing an unwanted inoperability condition.

The other method of maintenance is visual inspection and replace, if it appears to need it. Naturally driving conditions and environment have a great deal to do with the frequency.

 
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the99contour

New member
I was told my belt (timing?) needed to be replaced.
Your car has a timing chain that should last until the car is a rustbucket. Some new Japanese cars and almost all of the ones built before the late 1990s had timing belts. They had to be replaced anywhere from every 30k to every 90k. If you didn't replace them you were risking it big, because if it broke while you were driving, you might ruin your engine. At bare minium, you'd be stranded.

Anyway, this was always a sticking point for some buyers concerning Japanese cars. They were used to driving cars until they broke and then fixing them. The Japanese cars wanted maintenance, which costs upfront. A lot of people didn't like the idea of paying 600 every 30-60k to replace a belt. What they didn't realize is that it was still cheaper to keep a Japanese car for 10 years, even with the timing belt changes. Maintenance is always cheaper than repair.

 

ycr99

New member
I'm taking my car to the dealer tomorrow...

I guess if it's not timing chain then probably serpentine belt then?

Change braking fluid, rotors/pads, coolant, transmission fluid, serpentine belt...

anyone have a site for parts so I can figure out how much all this might cost (estimate wise) so I can compare when I get to the dealership...

I'm looking at an old invoice for similar work, but this one doesn't include the transmission flush, brake fluid flush or serpentine belt replacement so I can foresee upto $900 maybe? (with work included)

 

ycr99

New member
I know...I'd fix it if I had even a slightest clue...

I don't own an owner's manual, I can't seem to get my hands on a Chilton's or hayne's in my model year... (at the library)

I can't even find them in the bookstore...

I don't even know where to begin in my google search


 

MatrixTech

New member
I know...I'd fix it if I had even a slightest clue...
I don't own an owner's manual, I can't seem to get my hands on a Chilton's or hayne's in my model year... (at the library)

I can't even find them in the bookstore...

I don't even know where to begin in my google search
Guys the serp belt should last @45k to 60k miles and thats under good driving paractices.

The tensioners do go bad on the 1zz often and should be checked.as a tech I ALWAYS check them when they come in for replacement or noise.

If you are gonna do it yourself dont be cheap because it WILL HURT when you get bitten for doing it with the wrong part.Buy the Toyota part and get what you paid for.

after removing the belt pump the tensoiner between loose and tight 3 times and if there is very little resistance when compressing the tensioner the replace it. and oyu will need a jack and other thing to unbolt the motor mount and raise the engine to get the tensioner bolt out.then after pumping the tensioner 3 times reinstall the belt. You have to pump the tensioner to remove trapped air and extend the life.

Also if you see an oily residue on the tensioner body(looks like a shock) then replace it as well.

As a Toyota Tech I have spent years honing my knowledge of these cars and do expect to be paid a fair wage.

Look at it from my eyes,you just drove your vehicle around for half the day.You start to hear a strange noise you bring it to a dealer,the tech whom has spent possibly over a year in school and countless hours learning just exactly could be wrong with your beloved car goes to look t it and the egine itself is over 190 degrees. The tech recommends that you replace your belt and tensioner. You say OK.Now this person gets to put his hands in the 190+ degree engine bay and change the parts that are needed.all the while knowing that when he is done no more noise for you but now he is slightly burned from wedging his hand between the motor and frame.

Yeah I know there are guys out there to try and rip you off.If you think that your getting ripped at a Dealer then ask for the service manager.And then ask to see the labor time guide and it will tell you what the time should be.Do I over quote labor yes only when it involves a rusty car or haveing to go home with burns on my hands.

Treat a mechanic/tech with the same respect you would expect.if you like the job me completed then let him know just like you like to get compliments for a job well done.

Stepping Down Now.

I love my job and enjoy the challenges I face with Toyota everyday.

 

JeremyH

New member
If you are gonna do it yourself dont be cheap because it WILL HURT when you get bitten for doing it with the wrong part.Buy the Toyota part and get what you paid for.after removing the belt pump the tensoiner between loose and tight 3 times and if there is very little resistance when compressing the tensioner the replace it. and oyu will need a jack and other thing to unbolt the motor mount and raise the engine to get the tensioner bolt out.then after pumping the tensioner 3 times reinstall the belt. You have to pump the tensioner to remove trapped air and extend the life.

Also if you see an oily residue on the tensioner body(looks like a shock) then replace it as well.
MT,

thanks for the info on the tensioner. My wife's '05 Corolla has recently developed a "belt like" squeal when at idle and I couldnt figure out why since the belt is in perfect shape (only ~25K mi).

Is this something that is routinely replaced under warranty by the dealer?

JeremyH

 

twinky64

New member
Reading this forum I read that it is extremely common for corollas, 8th gen +, to have a belt squeak. I thought it was the belt tensioner myself. But, I didn't want to spend that much money to replace it so I thought I'd give it a shot at replacing the serpentine belt. Its fixed! I wonder if its just toyota's stock serp. belt? Also, you can get some compound to put on the serp. belt to relieve the squeaking. They sell them at any auto shop and they come in a little pouch. Maybe this helps. I have a 98 so perhaps it doesn't pertain to you since you have an 05.

 

JeremyH

New member
Yeah, I have tried belt dressing in the past and I dont like to use it. I believe that it softens the rubber in the belt and causes it to deteriorate faster than it should.

I'll try a new belt since the shock on the tensioner looks like it is in perfect condition.

Jeremy

 

Bikeman982

Bikeman982
Yeah, I have tried belt dressing in the past and I dont like to use it. I believe that it softens the rubber in the belt and causes it to deteriorate faster than it should.
I'll try a new belt since the shock on the tensioner looks like it is in perfect condition.

Jeremy
If the belt is worn - replace it, if it looks fine - try adjusting the tension on it.

 

JeremyH

New member
If the belt is worn - replace it, if it looks fine - try adjusting the tension on it.
How would the tension be adjusted? Isnt the tension determined by the "shock" on the tensioner apparatus?

Sorry for the lack of knowledge, but I have driven jeeps all of my life and they have all had the typical bolt style bent tensioner.

 

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