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Snow 2.0



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We just got over a foot of snow over the last day and a half.

I just got back from digging my friends civic out of her curbside parking space so she could go to college in the morning. I left my apartment at 11:45pm drove 3 miles got there at 12:00 midnight (12 mph avg.) dug her out till 12:40am then drove 3 miles back got here at 1:00am (9mph avg.) and then dug the neighbor lady out till 1:10. I'm cold. I'm tired. I'm cranky. But, I still love winter.

The roads are inexcusably awful for as many plows as I saw out there this evening. I thought I was going to get stuck so many times I stopped counting, but that little Prizm/Corolla pushed through it all.

EDIT: I forgot to mention... It's still snowing.

EDIT #2: Current road conditions from the Indiana State Police website says it all.

DISTRICT/52 SP INDIANAPOLIS

I-465 INDIANAPOLIS AREA - BECOMING IMPASSABLE

I-65 INDIANAPOLIS AREA - BECOMING IMPASSABLE

I-65 EDINBURGH TO INDIANAPOLIS - BECOMING IMPASSABLE

I-65 INDIANAPOLIS TO THORNTOWN - BECOMING IMPASSABLE

I-70 INDIANAPOLIS AREA - BECOMING IMPASSABLE

I-70 INDIANAPOLIS TO MONROVIA - BECOMING IMPASSABLE

I-74 INDIANAPOLIS AREA - BECOMING IMPASSABLE

OTHER US AND STATE ROADS - BECOMING IMPASSABLE

SECONDARY ROADS - BECOMING IMPASSABLE

I had a terrible time with the snow tonight. I have had about 4 cars, the corolla being my favorite, but somehow its worse than all other cars ive ever driven in the snow, including rear wheel drive cars, I dont understand it. I love the car, but it surprises me when conditions are less than pleasing.

I had a Chevy Corsica before I had the Prizm. The Corsica handled better in the snow than the Prizm does but the Prizm handles better than I expected.

You know, it's funny how people think that big SUVs are the perfect thing to drive in winter conditions, but they really aren't. They are usually rear wheel drive with very little weight on the back end.

When the weather gets bad down here, I drive my wife's corolla. Vehicles with most of the weight (i.e. engine) over the drive/steering axle do the best in snow/ice.

All I got was rain in CA. I used to love doing 360's in the snow with my van in MA.

I have never driven a Corolla in the snow.

A lot depends on your tires. I have these damn OEM Goodyears on my 06 (Conquests?) and I'm getting stuck in a couple of inches. I got stuck at an intersection and a cop stopped and says "isn't that front wheel drive? ", "Goodyear tires" I said and he goes "oh". Getting these off this weekend. I've had cheap tires on my other Corolla which had a very aggressive tread on for an all season and that thing was unstoppable.

I have to agree, the Corolla is not the best vehicle I've had in the snow. My driveway is the determining factor in my opinion on this.

Of course, choice of tires can make a huge difference but I would actually prefer rear wheel drive in snow....you can always add weight in the trunk and/or rear seat. With front wheel drive, you have what you have for weight over the front wheels. Once you add passengers, gasoline and whatever else you carry in the trunk for emergencies, you have diluted the advantage as the weight shifts to the rear.

I once had a 1984 Plymouth Horizon (company car) with brand new Sears RoadHandler mud and snows made by Michelin mounted all around. This was really a great little car and had super traction. One day with my tools under the hatch and three other guys as passengers, the front tires started spinning while going up a rain covered grade at 50 MPH. It surprised me as I didn't have my foot into it....just cruising up a grade.

Jay in MA

The highways are a mess.....state should be ashamed. During my commute this AM from 6:00 to 7:45 I saw ZERO plows on the road.....just piles of slush throwing cars from lane to lane.

I had a terrible time with the snow tonight. I have had about 4 cars, the corolla being my favorite, but somehow its worse than all other cars ive ever driven in the snow, including rear wheel drive cars, I dont understand it. I love the car, but it surprises me when conditions are less than pleasing.

I took the day off today from both school and work. I don't care if my Corolla ran on 8 wheels and had full time AWD, no way am I subjecting my beautiful little car to this awful weather. I'm glad we got a garage. The sleet and snow would be cutting my nice cleaning job 2 days ago to pieces.

As for handling, I don't think my dad's old Lexus ES300 or my mom's old Jeep Grand Cherokee handled any better than the Corolla. Aside from the ABS systems and the higher ground clearance of the Jeep, those cars didn't feel like they had any better advantage on the snow. I have been through 2 severe winters with my Corolla and didn't even come close to getting into an accident. All it takes is a little caution and patience which people seem to lose everytime the snow hits.

You know, it's funny how people think that big SUVs are the perfect thing to drive in winter conditions, but they really aren't. They are usually rear wheel drive with very little weight on the back end.

When the weather gets bad down here, I drive my wife's corolla. Vehicles with most of the weight (i.e. engine) over the drive/steering axle do the best in snow/ice.

A 4x4 truck or SUV can be a good thing, if they have the right tires. Most SUVs end up off the side of the road because 99.9% of them leave the factory set up for a nice(er) ride on a paved road. Only Jeep and maybe a few others offer a dirt and mud tire (they generally have great snow ratings too) and not too many owners are going to order the true Jeep off road package, or the off road TRD package. So most SUV with 4x4 have street tires that are for the most part useless on snow and ice. Add to that the moron factor because the mighty SUV thing that 4x4 also helps steering and stopping.

Now, for the last two days, I wish I had a Jeep with proper off road tires that can eat through snow too because between actual snow fall and snow drifting, ground clearance becomes a problem on a sedan. We have two cars with snow tires. The Corolla, that went out while the snow was still falling and it barely made it back home and a AWD sedan that for the first tine since I bought it, I was afraid to take it out because I didn't want to damage the the front bumper and a rather expensive IC core against the snow that was way taller then the axles on the car.

The only people I've seen truly able to make it are vehicles built on truck frames. Bash them all you want, when it comes down the grunt, ground clearance, and proper 4x4, trucks have them and they have the upper hand with the right tires and driver right now. My arse is stuck at home today.. Again. We won't make it out till tomorrow. We live off of a secondary road, in the city and it was just plowed a few hours ago for the school bus. The city was still pretty much shut down, but they are working hard to get everything moving for tomorrow. I can't remember when snow has caused this much problems. I've seen over 2' of snow in the Boston area before, but they clear that stuff right away, and it melted in three days. This foot of snow we've gotten is a nightmare. It has about 1.5" of ice in it. When I shovel it, I can see 4 different types of layers in it. It is extremely heavy and it pretty much all ice and powder snow. It has been so cold, we've had the same snow on the ground for well over a month now. It looks like it might go above freezing Monday, so hopefully stuff will melt for once. I have a Siberian husky and she has trouble getting through the snow. I mean, she's a freaken snow dog!

The problem with trucks is that they are rear wheel drive. In icy conditions, a rear wheel drive vehicle will just spin the rear tires when the accelerator is depressed (from a stop).

BTW, my comments are made based on the opinion that everyday, I drive a Jeep with 33" BFG mud terrain tires. It has locked front and rear differentials (which forces forward motion).

The problem with trucks is that they are rear wheel drive. In icy conditions, a rear wheel drive vehicle will just spin the rear tires when the accelerator is depressed (from a stop).

BTW, my comments are made based on the opinion that everyday, I drive a Jeep with 33" BFG mud terrain tires. It has locked front and rear differentials (which forces forward motion).

I don't know anyone with a RWD truck that thinks it is great for the snow. I was talking about 4x4s. I typed 4x4 over and over. The 2x4 trucks can suck it up and be stuck at home. They shouldn't even attempt to get out either.

Locking front and rear diff is great, but even with out it, 4x4 trucks and cross overs should have at least a clutch LSD system in the rear and that works really well for snow. Many 4x4s that shouldn't attempt actual off roading have a good auto for getting through the snow. If the owners would just buy better tires and drive safer, they would be okay.

I used to have studded snow tires for my van that I used during the worst of the snow days.

Snow chains can also help, but be sure and take them off when the roads get clear.

Got to try out the snow tires here the past two days.. Thought they performed fairly well.. Almost was stuck once when I started to drive into a drift I didn't see, but I made it..Drove through snow as deep as 8"... Haven't driven a stick in deep snow since I was in Germany.. (1987) Took a little getting used to..

my van in MA.

What part if I may ask... I grew up in Pittsfield..

I was talking about 4x4s. I typed 4x4 over and over. The 2x4 trucks can suck it up and be stuck at home.

Trust me, 4WD is not the end all, be all. It does not fix every situation. Those 4x4 trucks still have no weight in the rear of the truck and will still spin.

 

 

Got to try out the snow tires here the past two days.. Thought they performed fairly well.. Almost was stuck once when I started to drive into a drift I didn't see, but I made it..Drove through snow as deep as 8"... Haven't driven a stick in deep snow since I was in Germany.. (1987) Took a little getting used to..

my van in MA.

What part if I may ask... I grew up in Pittsfield..

Wow 8 inches? It must have been light snow. 8 inches is about 3 times my ground clearance.

 

As for the age-old 4 wheel drive vs 2 wheel drive debate, my belief is that it makes almost no difference. If you can lose traction on 2 wheels, what is your rationalization for thinking 4 wheels can't lose traction either? I can understand how 4WD works better in rain because you have more surface space underneath the car to grip the road, but in snow, its a completely different story. Unless the was snow underneath one part of the car and not the other, sure 4WD would help them, but if snow is underneath your entire car (which it usually is) well then you're just out of luck. Snow is snow. My mom's Jeep got stuck just as much as my dad's Lexus did. The only major difference was that it was easier to get the Jeep out since it had a higher ground clearance and didn't have to fight the snow underneath the car. Still, if the snow got high enough, even the Jeep couldn't break through.

There's no way I'm choosing my Prizm over my Chevy full size 4wd in the zone. No comparison in real snow. If you drive interstate or state highways, you won't see much difference, but get off the main roads and the 4wd shines.

Tires really do make the difference no matter what vehicle you have. In areas subject to snow, you need to replace tires before they get to the wear indicator. You really get what you pay for in tires - if put on some Pep Boys no-name specials, don't expect much.

Worst vehicle I ever had in the snow was a Trans Am. No weight in the back end, fat rear tires, and boat loads of torque default_ohmy

Wow 8 inches? It must have been light snow. 8 inches is about 3 times my ground clearance.

Yes it was light snow.. default_wink

I was talking about 4x4s. I typed 4x4 over and over. The 2x4 trucks can suck it up and be stuck at home.

Trust me, 4WD is not the end all, be all. It does not fix every situation. Those 4x4 trucks still have no weight in the rear of the truck and will still spin.

 

 

It doesn't fix every situation, but it is better for not getting stuck, and taking off. I don't have a 4x4 truck, but I've had a AWD car since 98 and I've been putting dedicated snow tires on it for years every winter. I was able to drive out of the neighborhood with streets that were technically cleared, but it was pretty much a joke. The 05 Rolla with dedicated snow tires got stuck about 15' from the driveway. I had to grab a shovel and go to work, and then I still had to push it back home.

I'll take my AWD and 4x4 any day of the week in a snow storm. Just give me proper tires too.

It is best not to drive in bad snow - if you have a choice.

If you do need to go somewhere, consider waiting until the roads get plowed better or are cleared more.

If you have to get someplace, use chains, studded snow tires or 4WD (if you have it).

I have the OEM Bridgestones on my car, they have roughly 20k on them. Let me say that I am impressed by this car and it's tires.

I only had to rock twice to get over a 10" snow pile that was behind my car. The car next to me (a FWD Buick) had to shovel out of less snow.

I've driven on snow several times, and this car and these tires are champs.

Guess I got lucky that I didn't get the Goodyears as OEM.

It is best not to drive in bad snow - if you have a choice.If you do need to go somewhere, consider waiting until the roads get plowed better or are cleared more.

 

If you have to get someplace, use chains, studded snow tires or FWD (if you have it).

 

Our road wasn't plowed for two days and chains and studs are not legal in our state. When they did finally plow our road, they did such a lousy job that lots of people kept getting stuck at a intersection by our house. The corolla got stuck too, but by the 3rd day, the city was open and not going to work wasn't excused anymore.

Keep in mind we got about a foot of dry powder snow with layers of ice in it, so it was a huge mess. Then is started drifting after it fell. The corolla just wasn't up to the challenge this round.

In MA we can use studs from November 1st through April 30th but I don't know of anyone that uses them anymore. Chains are a no-no though unless you have a large truck where they are required in certain situations.

It is best not to drive in bad snow - if you have a choice.If you do need to go somewhere, consider waiting until the roads get plowed better or are cleared more.

 

If you have to get someplace, use chains, studded snow tires or FWD (if you have it).

 

Our road wasn't plowed for two days and chains and studs are not legal in our state. When they did finally plow our road, they did such a lousy job that lots of people kept getting stuck at a intersection by our house. The corolla got stuck too, but by the 3rd day, the city was open and not going to work wasn't excused anymore.

Keep in mind we got about a foot of dry powder snow with layers of ice in it, so it was a huge mess. Then is started drifting after it fell. The corolla just wasn't up to the challenge this round.

I had Bridgestone all season tires on a 1986 S-10, 4 cylinder, 4 speed, 2 wheel drive truck. That old truck was incredible in snow using those tires and weight in the bed.

I have the OEM Bridgestones on my car, they have roughly 20k on them. Let me say that I am impressed by this car and it's tires.

I only had to rock twice to get over a 10" snow pile that was behind my car. The car next to me (a FWD Buick) had to shovel out of less snow.

I've driven on snow several times, and this car and these tires are champs.

Guess I got lucky that I didn't get the Goodyears as OEM.

I drove my new Corolla in that hellish storm for the first time (in snow) on Weds. I'll have to say, I was impressed with the way it handled, especially since it was my first automatic w/out ABS. Granted, I have nice bridgestone blizzaks on for winter, but even still, Rt9 was covered in a few inches of packed, icy conditions with 8 inch slop at intersections. I've never seen the roads that bad in the Worcester area. The only time I had trouble was in the really loose snow, but then the tires just dug in and took off when they hit the bottom of the pile. I actually liked not having ABS, and felt like I had more control braking then when the pedal is pulsating like crazy. I do miss my old V6 Contour in the snow. With a good set of Blizzaks and the 5spd, that car could go anywhere (I once drove through 10 inches on an unplowed street for a few miles-granted, I had the tires spinning to nearly 60mph to not get stuck).

In the Corolla the other day, I was passing SUV's going up hills. The confidence was there...

I'll have to say though, I'd take my old F350 w/all terrain tires and 800lbs of sand in the bed anyday. There was NOTHING that truck couldn't get through. I don't care what people say about trucks. If you have great tread and know what you're doing, they'll pass anything on the road.

~Chris

(stepping off of soapbox)

Hey, I'm from Framingham! I'm only about 20 miles from where you live. Wow, they are alot of Massachusettians (is that a word?) on Corolland. I didn't brave the storm that day. I just skipped my college classes and called out from work. Last winter was bad enough for me, but I agree with you. While a Corolla certainly isn't the best designed car for nor'easters, it definately handles above average compared to others.