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99 Charcol Canister



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can a bad canister drop the gas mileage severely? mines droped about 50-80 mpg's. how much to fix?

Several things can affect your mileage. The vapor canister generally will not affect your overall mileage unless the unit is siphoning gas out of your tank and venting it out (same affect as a gas leak). Not a cheap fix, depending on what is wrong with te EVAP system - the parts cost alone will run anywhere from $75 for a solenoid to over $160 for the vapor canister.

50-80MPG?? Do you mean the car is dropping 50-80 miles to the tank? Did you pull any trouble codes from the ECM? What other stuff have you done to the car - followed up on normal maintenance?

Several things can affect your mileage. The vapor canister generally will not affect your overall mileage unless the unit is siphoning gas out of your tank and venting it out (same affect as a gas leak). Not a cheap fix, depending on what is wrong with te EVAP system - the parts cost alone will run anywhere from $75 for a solenoid to over $160 for the vapor canister.

50-80MPG?? Do you mean the car is dropping 50-80 miles to the tank? Did you pull any trouble codes from the ECM? What other stuff have you done to the car - followed up on normal maintenance?

 

i just pulled the code and got a this P0440EVAP Control System Large Leak (0.080") DetectedWas looking around and sounds like the gas cap can be the problem. hopefully its only that

I just replaced mine yesterday...codes 0441, 0446. $267 from a Toyota dealer with a 1 year warranty. I'm hoping to see an improvement in mileage. I'll let you know. I rack up about 500 miles/week

I just replaced mine yesterday...codes 0441, 0446. $267 from a Toyota dealer with a 1 year warranty. I'm hoping to see an improvement in mileage. I'll let you know. I rack up about 500 miles/week

Doesn't sound very cheap - did that include the llabor for them to change it, or was it just for the cannister and you changed it??

 

Hope it fixes your problem.

I just replaced mine yesterday...codes 0441, 0446. $267 from a Toyota dealer with a 1 year warranty. I'm hoping to see an improvement in mileage. I'll let you know. I rack up about 500 miles/week

Doesn't sound very cheap - did that include the labor for them to change it, or was it just for the cannister and you changed it??

 

Hope it fixes your problem.

Just upgraded the cluster with a tack, changed the blower moter and the evap canister, boy it was a bitch getting the canister out had to drop the muffler and getting the top hose off was a real bitch!! well did it all for $290 default_wink

So you did find that it was a bad vapor canister? Was it cracked or anything? Yeah, it is pretty tough to get at - tucked up behind the suspension and infront of the tank. They changed the location of the canister on the later generation of Corolla (you can get at it by removing the driver's side rear passenger wheel) - that seems to be completely immune to the EVAP codes that some of the 8th gen Corollas were having.

So you did find that it was a bad vapor canister? Was it cracked or anything? Yeah, it is pretty tough to get at - tucked up behind the suspension and infront of the tank. They changed the location of the canister on the later generation of Corolla (you can get at it by removing the driver's side rear passenger wheel) - that seems to be completely immune to the EVAP codes that some of the 8th gen Corollas were having.

canister wasn't cracked but since i changed it about a 100 miles ago the check engine light didn't come back on. i'm not really handy so changing the entire canister was alot easier than trouble shooting it.

So you did find that it was a bad vapor canister? Was it cracked or anything? Yeah, it is pretty tough to get at - tucked up behind the suspension and infront of the tank. They changed the location of the canister on the later generation of Corolla (you can get at it by removing the driver's side rear passenger wheel) - that seems to be completely immune to the EVAP codes that some of the 8th gen Corollas were having.

canister wasn't cracked but since i changed it about a 100 miles ago the check engine light didn't come back on. i'm not really handy so changing the entire canister was alot easier than trouble shooting it.

I'm about to scream

You have to diagnose what is happening - throwing parts at it will only introduce new unknowns to the problem.

P0441 and P0446 EVAP codes point to a leak somewhere - 99% of the shops out there will blame the vapor canister, as it is the most expensive item to fix (labor wise) and the code "seems" to point to it as being the culprit. But in actuality, about 90% of the time, the vapor canister is perfectly fine.

The problem is usually a vacuum leak anywhere from the intake manifold to the gas cap. A "sniffer" test can help pinpoint the leak - also there is a specfic testing procedures to check the VSV valves close to the vapor canister (using compressed air and vacuum tools, and energizing certain valves to see if they are switching when they are supposed to - then finishing it up with an OBD-II I/M selftest to double check the work).

You have to diagnose what is happening - throwing parts at it will only introduce new unknowns to the problem.

P0441 and P0446 EVAP codes point to a leak somewhere - 99% of the shops out there will blame the vapor canister, as it is the most expensive item to fix (labor wise) and the code "seems" to point to it as being the culprit. But in actuality, about 90% of the time, the vapor canister is perfectly fine.

The problem is usually a vacuum leak anywhere from the intake manifold to the gas cap. A "sniffer" test can help pinpoint the leak - also there is a specfic testing procedures to check the VSV valves close to the vapor canister (using compressed air and vacuum tools, and energizing certain valves to see if they are switching when they are supposed to - then finishing it up with an OBD-II I/M selftest to double check the work).

well i'm going to check all the hoses tonight and check the gas cap, how is a sniffer test performed? i really hate taking this car to the dealer. my local toyota dealer is a retarded crook! i know from experience.

Sniffer test or smoke test needs specialized equipment. Basically you pressurize the EVAP system with either nitrogen or clean air - use a machine to add special smoke (UV sensitive dye), to cycle the EVAP system. Also need a Toyota scan tool to set the ECM to "test" mode and have it close the vent valve to actually be able to pressurize the system. Then you go over every vent, vacuum hose, fitting, valve, etc. and see if you can see the smoke (use a UV wand or strong UV spotlight). Any leaks will light up instantly. But the machine is not cheap - I think I've seen the portable ones list for around $1500. That is just for the testing machine, then you need the Toyota diagnostic scan tool, aircompressor or nitrogen tank, chemicals, fittings, etc.

If the dealer doesn't do a good job, find a independent mechanic that specilizes in Japanese imports. A HVAC shop might also have the equipment to test the EVAP system.

I had similar codes on and off for some time - ended up being a cut-off valve for me (little rubber valve on the top of the gas tank). I spent probably two weekends looking at every hose running to the EVAP system - didn't find any leaks. Decided to bite the bullet and take it to the dealership - paid $85, technician did a quick visual inspection, did his diagnostic sheet, then the sniffer/smoke test. Ended up dropping the tank to find that leak. Long story short - bought the valve for $30, changed it myself, saved over $350 in labor.

You have to diagnose what is happening - throwing parts at it will only introduce new unknowns to the problem.

P0441 and P0446 EVAP codes point to a leak somewhere - 99% of the shops out there will blame the vapor canister, as it is the most expensive item to fix (labor wise) and the code "seems" to point to it as being the culprit. But in actuality, about 90% of the time, the vapor canister is perfectly fine.

The problem is usually a vacuum leak anywhere from the intake manifold to the gas cap. A "sniffer" test can help pinpoint the leak - also there is a specfic testing procedures to check the VSV valves close to the vapor canister (using compressed air and vacuum tools, and energizing certain valves to see if they are switching when they are supposed to - then finishing it up with an OBD-II I/M selftest to double check the work).

well i'm going to check all the hoses tonight and check the gas cap, how is a sniffer test performed? i really hate taking this car to the dealer. my local toyota dealer is a retarded crook! i know from experience.

well i only have code 0446 now so changing the canister corrected the 0441, does the 0446 narrow anthing down? does anyone know where the sensor in the engine is? i know when i filled up the attendent topped of the gas so much it overflowed i'm hoping that was the cause. i cleared the code and am getting a new gas cap tomorrow.

well i only have code 0446 now so changing the canister corrected the 0441, does the 0446 narrow anthing down? does anyone know where the sensor in the engine is? i know when i filled up the attendent topped of the gas so much it overflowed i'm hoping that was the cause. i cleared the code and am getting a new gas cap tomorrow.

There is an EVAP check port (green colored cap) close the sensor under the hood - the sensor itself should be right on the airbox. P0446 could be anything from a leaky gas cap to a plugged vacuum tube. Most common culprits are a leaky gasket on the filler cap - if it looks deformed or shredded - I'd replace it.

 

Ouch, definitely watch for topping off of the tank - that is the #1 cause of vapor canister failures on the 8th generation Corolla. Topping off can cause liquid gasoline, instead of just gasoline vapors, to enter the canister. Once liquid gets in there - the activated charcoal will become saturated and you'll end up with a $200-$300 paperweight.

well i only have code 0446 now so changing the canister corrected the 0441, does the 0446 narrow anthing down? does anyone know where the sensor in the engine is? i know when i filled up the attendent topped of the gas so much it overflowed i'm hoping that was the cause. i cleared the code and am getting a new gas cap tomorrow.

There is an EVAP check port (green colored cap) close the sensor under the hood - the sensor itself should be right on the airbox. P0446 could be anything from a leaky gas cap to a plugged vacuum tube. Most common culprits are a leaky gasket on the filler cap - if it looks deformed or shredded - I'd replace it.

 

Ouch, definitely watch for topping off of the tank - that is the #1 cause of vapor canister failures on the 8th generation Corolla. Topping off can cause liquid gasoline, instead of just gasoline vapors, to enter the canister. Once liquid gets in there - the activated charcoal will become saturated and you'll end up with a $200-$300 paperweight.

Fish i totally give up changed the cas cap and it gave me about 20 mores miles before the CEL came on again, this time a went 140 miles then got the CEL again anyway since i gave up my friend is going to take care of it, hes the head mech at the Lexus dealer here in NY. Hope its simple and fast!!

Post back what they find as the cause of the EVAP codes. Be interesting to see what is the culprit or culprits with the car.

Changed mine myself. !/2 an hour, 267 from Toy. dealer w/1 year warranty. Muffler did not have to be dropped.

Post back what they find as the cause of the EVAP codes. Be interesting to see what is the culprit or culprits with the car.

after 9 mths of CEL, changing the canister and the sensor in the engine (next to the green thingy) CEL is finally gone!!! also had to have all the lines in the evap system blown out.

Good deal!