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A Supercharged 2zz-ge, 215+ Hp



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I've been doing some search around on the internet for ways to get some extreme power into a Corolla without dealing with heavy problems of modifications, fabrications, and space issues. I came across several mechanics who specialize in engine swaps. Many of them note the similarities and relative ease in swapping a 2ZZ-GE engine in from a 1ZZ-FE. I've been thinking about taking it a step further by supercharging the 2ZZ engine. It has been done in cars like the new Lotus Exige S, which makes about 218HP and a nice 185 lbs-ft torque. Imagine having 218HP on a 2400lbs Corolla; it makes goosebumps on my arm! I could tell that obnoxious loser next to me on the highway with his 2 ton Thunderbird to eat my dust!

My question is how relatively easy would it be to do this? Is it going to be within a reasonable price range? (under $5000)

Have no clue how easy it would be, but that would be fun to have 200+ hp in a Rolla. It would be a sleeeeper, and a good one at that.

Under $5K - I only wish, because I would have already jumped on that one.

A clean 2ZZ-GE runs about $1500+ with tranny, ECM, and wiring. Most of the halfcuts I've seen run in the $2K-$3K complete. The S/C kit (probably manufacturered by Blitz) runs about $3K by itself + install, dyno tuning, and addition fabrication. In the end - might have close to $10K easy with that swap.

But your're right, be one hell of a Corolla.

A little too rich for my tastes.

I probably would get in trouble with that much power.

I suppose it depends on the driver. Alot of people tell me when I want more power in my Corolla, just use the money and buy a Lexus or sports car. 220HP in a Corolla means near BMW M3 perfomance. In many cases, even spending $10,000 on my Corolla is still cheaper than buying a used M3. The trade in value of my car is $3000. I don't know about you, but $13,000 isn't even close to enough to buy any high performance car; many a Mustang or a used Corvette, but do you really want to carry all the extra problems than come with American sports cars?

215+ HP without a front LSD is going to be very annoying. I got rid of a FWD turbo car because I would spin the tires without trying and it was hard to get traction. It didn't have a front LSD. I could have had one installed, but the car was too old to throw that much money at it.

Anyway, I just ran 3 more psi then boost, a better intercooler set up and some exhaust work and traction was useless on it.

I did some searching on google once and found a JDM LSD for the corolla, but it doesn't come with any warranty, and finding someone to install it correctly could be a challenge in itself.

I wouldn't reach for any real power gains without it. Having power is useless if you can't get it to the ground. Please don't learn that the hard way and the very expensive way. A 215+HP corolla would probably have some decent top end, but without traction, other cars will blow it out of the water taking off and it's hard to catch up.

I suppose it depends on the driver. Alot of people tell me when I want more power in my Corolla, just use the money and buy a Lexus or sports car. 220HP in a Corolla means near BMW M3 perfomance. In many cases, even spending $10,000 on my Corolla is still cheaper than buying a used M3. The trade in value of my car is $3000. I don't know about you, but $13,000 isn't even close to enough to buy any high performance car; many a Mustang or a used Corvette, but do you really want to carry all the extra problems than come with American sports cars?

You can buy a 1997 M3 for under $10k

 

http://orangecounty.craigslist.org/car/276024304.html

215+ HP without a front LSD is going to be very annoying. I got rid of a FWD turbo car because I would spin the tires without trying and it was hard to get traction. It didn't have a front LSD. I could have had one installed, but the car was too old to throw that much money at it.

Anyway, I just ran 3 more psi then boost, a better intercooler set up and some exhaust work and traction was useless on it.

I did some searching on google once and found a JDM LSD for the corolla, but it doesn't come with any warranty, and finding someone to install it correctly could be a challenge in itself.

I wouldn't reach for any real power gains without it. Having power is useless if you can't get it to the ground. Please don't learn that the hard way and the very expensive way. A 215+HP corolla would probably have some decent top end, but without traction, other cars will blow it out of the water taking off and it's hard to catch up.

I think you're blowing this out of porportion. The new fwd Camry V6's are up to 268 HP! My Dad's 06' Camry SE V6 (the 3MZ-FE engine) is also front-wheel drive, yet it feel like it could do the quarter mile in the time it takes me to reach 60. His car makes about 225 HP and I have never really noticed a heavy problem of wheel slipage or traction loss. Sure his car might lose out in a race with the rear-wheel drive ES330, but only by a few tenths of a second.

 

By the way, what Andrej is talking about isn't that taboo. I see a fairly ample community of Corolla XRS cars which are either supercharged or turbocharged (see www.cardomain.com), so what he is talking about isn't exactly alot of steps away.

215+ HP without a front LSD is going to be very annoying. I got rid of a FWD turbo car because I would spin the tires without trying and it was hard to get traction. It didn't have a front LSD. I could have had one installed, but the car was too old to throw that much money at it.

Anyway, I just ran 3 more psi then boost, a better intercooler set up and some exhaust work and traction was useless on it.

I did some searching on google once and found a JDM LSD for the corolla, but it doesn't come with any warranty, and finding someone to install it correctly could be a challenge in itself.

I wouldn't reach for any real power gains without it. Having power is useless if you can't get it to the ground. Please don't learn that the hard way and the very expensive way. A 215+HP corolla would probably have some decent top end, but without traction, other cars will blow it out of the water taking off and it's hard to catch up.

I think you're blowing this out of porportion. The new fwd Camry V6's are up to 268 HP! My Dad's 06' Camry SE V6 (the 3MZ-FE engine) is also front-wheel drive, yet it feel like it could do the quarter mile in the time it takes me to reach 60. His car makes about 225 HP and I have never really noticed a heavy problem of wheel slipage or traction loss. Sure his car might lose out in a race with the rear-wheel drive ES330, but only by a few tenths of a second.

 

By the way, what Andrej is talking about isn't that taboo. I see a fairly ample community of Corolla XRS cars which are either supercharged or turbocharged (see www.cardomain.com), so what he is talking about isn't exactly alot of steps away.

A camery is a heavier car. The extra weight helps out. My friend has a SCed GXP and he doesn't have traction problems either. A light FWD will. If you don't personally have experience with it, you are only guessing. Sorry, but link to what other people have done doesn't make you a expert on the matter.

Sure his car might lose out in a race with the rear-wheel drive ES330, but only by a few tenths of a second.

Umm, the ES330 is a FWD car, and the ES line were always FWD cars. The IS330 is a RWD car and the GS cars are RWD.

215+ HP without a front LSD is going to be very annoying. I got rid of a FWD turbo car because I would spin the tires without trying and it was hard to get traction. It didn't have a front LSD. I could have had one installed, but the car was too old to throw that much money at it.

Anyway, I just ran 3 more psi then boost, a better intercooler set up and some exhaust work and traction was useless on it.

I did some searching on google once and found a JDM LSD for the corolla, but it doesn't come with any warranty, and finding someone to install it correctly could be a challenge in itself.

I wouldn't reach for any real power gains without it. Having power is useless if you can't get it to the ground. Please don't learn that the hard way and the very expensive way. A 215+HP corolla would probably have some decent top end, but without traction, other cars will blow it out of the water taking off and it's hard to catch up.

Wow, I didn't consider such things like too much power. What about if I didn't supercharge it, just leave it stock 168 hp XRS engine. Would I still have a problem of wheel slip? After all, the 2ZZ engine doesn't max out until something like 7500 RPM. I've never driven an XRS, but I assumed at low rpms, it performs similar to a stock Corolla, but at high rpms, it goes into beastmode.

 

 

Wow, I didn't consider such things like too much power. What about if I didn't supercharge it, just leave it stock 168 hp XRS engine. Would I still have a problem of wheel slip? After all, the 2ZZ engine doesn't max out until something like 7500 RPM. I've never driven an XRS, but I assumed at low rpms, it performs similar to a stock Corolla, but at high rpms, it goes into beastmode.

I test drove a XRS on dry roads and I didn't have problems with spinning the wheels. I also didn't push it that hard either. It did feel like it had more low end torque then a regular corolla. One of the main reason I didn't want the car, was I learned that it didn't have a front LSD.

If you don't already have a XRS and you want a fun 4cyl, I'd look at the new Honda Si. It comes in a 4 door now, has LSD stock, and it's going to have a better after market support too.

When you start getting close to 200HP in a light FWD car without LSD, spinning on dry roads isn't going to be a huge problem, but it will always be out performed by cars with LSD (assuming both cars have good tires), but on wet roads, and snowy roads, the faster cars really shine with LSD. Without it, the power only goes to one wheel and it's very easy to spin in anything but perfect driving conditions. Also, the type of LSD used now days also helps out in cornering, not just taking off. so it's better overall.

That is a good point - too much power will just end up spinning the front wheel (s).

I sometimes chirp my front tires by taking off too quickly and I have a stock engine.

Sorry I didn't realize the ES was front-wheel. Also, I'm not trying to claim I'm an expert gvr. I was just trying to show that this type of thing has been done before. I didn't know about weight being a factor for the Camry. I'm actually surprised about the weight issue since front-engined cars have a heavy bias of weight towards the front, something like 65% front/35% rear.

Back to engine swap talks:

What would be your opinion on an engine swap for the Celica GT's engine (the 1ZZ-FED) in my 98' Corolla. I'm not too personally fond of the 2ZZ-GE's engine. I have read alot of reviews which criticize the high rev it requires, and the heavy pedal foot needed for performance. Also, I'm definately not in love with the premium fuel it requires as gas prices go up. If I installed the Celica GT's engine in, it would be a gain of about 20 HP and 5 ft-lbs torque for me. Also, the EPA rating of the 05' Celica was 29/36 for automatic, while my car right now is 28/36, meaning I would gain a bit on MPG.

Performance wise, I could probably get my 0-60 time down to 8 seconds if I paired it with my weight reductions, allowing me to keep up with my friend who has an Audi A4 1.8T. I'm tired of him bashing my Corolla for being ages slower than his.

Sorry I didn't realize the ES was front-wheel. Also, I'm not trying to claim I'm an expert gvr. I was just trying to show that this type of thing has been done before. I didn't know about weight being a factor for the Camry. I'm actually surprised about the weight issue since front-engined cars have a heavy bias of weight towards the front, something like 65% front/35% rear.

 

Back to engine swap talks:

What would be your opinion on an engine swap for the Celica GT's engine (the 1ZZ-FED) in my 98' Corolla. I'm not too personally fond of the 2ZZ-GE's engine. I have read alot of reviews which criticize the high rev it requires, and the heavy pedal foot needed for performance. Also, I'm definately not in love with the premium fuel it requires as gas prices go up. If I installed the Celica GT's engine in, it would be a gain of about 20 HP and 5 ft-lbs torque for me. Also, the EPA rating of the 05' Celica was 29/36 for automatic, while my car right now is 28/36, meaning I would gain a bit on MPG.

Performance wise, I could probably get my 0-60 time down to 8 seconds if I paired it with my weight reductions, allowing me to keep up with my friend who has an Audi A4 1.8T. I'm tired of him bashing my Corolla for being ages slower than his.

If your wanting to play with a audi a4, then traction is very much going to be a issue. I hope your friend doesn't know how to launch is car.

POWER

Slipping and Spinning...

I had 205HP at the wheel on my 9-3 stock (its got a little more now - running a little more boost). I have no problems with launching. I can also do burnouts IF I want. Just need to know how to drive.

Back 15yrs ago (i feel so old!), my buddy had a dodge shadow es (i think). For those who do not remember it, it was a 2.5L Turbo fwd coupe. dont rem the power on it, but the torque steer was pretty bad.

If I was in a A4, I would be making fun of corollas and how slow they are too.

SWAP

Personally, I love swapping engines. Lots of fun in trying to figure out solutions and fabbing parts.

BUT, dont assume that you will get the same kind of milage as the specs state. It may get 30mpg in the donor car, but the car is designed and engineered to work well with the engine. drop it in a new car, and most likely not going to get the same power at the wheels nor the same milage.

Does TRD have any SC kits for smaller engines? That would be sweet.

The TRD SC for the 3.4 V6 is approx $3k, if that helps.

TRADING UP

If you spend time and look around, you can find some REALLY good deals out there. Both my Saabs and my old Celica, I got for a steal (20-50% below kbb).

A few months back, I saw a IS300 for $13k.

If you look around, you can also get RX7s, Supras, MR2s, Celicas, 300zx all for under 10k.

And nothing wrong with American Muscle. there LOTs of parts out there, and fairly easy to fix.

2bits

tdk.

I definately think I could beat my friend's A4. He has an 03'. Right now its running about 170 HP on a 3250 Lbs platform. That means about 1 HP per 19.13 Lbs. Right now I've reduced my Corolla's weight to about 2390 Lbs on 120 HP, which is 19.92 Lbs per HP, yet he can do the 0-60 time almost 2 seconds faster than me. If I installed the 140 HP engine of the Celica in, my rating would drop to 17.07 Lbs per HP. Even at a 10% extra power loss at the wheels, it will still give me a better power:weight ratio than his A4. As for handling and traction, I've already lowered my car 1" and installed a strut bar for better handling. I'm looking to eventually get performance tires to back it up to to wheels as well.

Does this guy have Quattro or just FWD on the Audi? If he has FWD, you could get an edge on him, if you massage your current engine. No need to go to an all out swap, unless you plan on running a huge amount of power. The power difference between the early 1ZZ-FE and 1ZZ-FED will not justify the cost of the swap, unless you want to do it for educational reasons or just for grins. For the price difference - I would just run a NOS system and spray a 25HP-50HP jet. That's a real 25HP-50HP boost and the OEM system can handle the increased fuel need for a short period of time without too much difficulty (only works at WOT, engine computer usually is tuned a little on the rich side anyway at that point ~10:1 AFR).

stop bench racing and goto the track.

Does anyone know if TRD superchargers can work with the 8th generation Corollas, or are they specifically designed for each car. I see a bunch of them selling on eBay, but they are only ones designed for Scion tC, Tacoma, or the 4Runner. Was there ever a TRD s/c made for the Corolla?

Does anyone know if TRD superchargers can work with the 8th generation Corollas, or are they specifically designed for each car. I see a bunch of them selling on eBay, but they are only ones designed for Scion tC, Tacoma, or the 4Runner. Was there ever a TRD s/c made for the Corolla?

Yes, but for non DBW Corolla's. Do a google search for 9th gen corolla forums. They go up for sale there every now and then.

It is also sold here. http://www.trdracing.com/corolla/corolla.htm

Anyone question; Is premium fuel required with a TRD supercharger, or is it optional for better performance?

Must run premium, unless you want to grenade the engine in a short time. Some have gotten away with running the middle grade of gas with water injection to help cool the intake charge - but at grave risk to their engines. Your tune has to be very conservative and everything ready to make sure that the engine doesn't run lean or EGT run too high. Remember - this S/C is not intercooled - a Roots type blower, it will heat up the intake charge, thus requiring premium fuel to avoid potentially expensive detonation problems.

Keep in mind that the TRD S/C was only designed for the 2003-2004 9th gen US Corolla only. The earlier 8th gen Corollas can not use them without extensive modifications (most go with a turbocharger in this case), later 9th gens could adapt the S/C - but only with a custom fabricated spacer for the intake manifold.

Must run premium, unless you want to grenade the engine in a short time. Some have gotten away with running the middle grade of gas with water injection to help cool the intake charge - but at grave risk to their engines. Your tune has to be very conservative and everything ready to make sure that the engine doesn't run lean or EGT run too high. Remember - this S/C is not intercooled - a Roots type blower, it will heat up the intake charge, thus requiring premium fuel to avoid potentially expensive detonation problems.

Keep in mind that the TRD S/C was only designed for the 2003-2004 9th gen US Corolla only. The earlier 8th gen Corollas can not use them without extensive modifications (most go with a turbocharger in this case), later 9th gens could adapt the S/C - but only with a custom fabricated spacer for the intake manifold.

Low boost SCed applications don't heat up the intake that much. Many factory roots style SCed applications don't have a intercooler and still require premium fuel. It's not so much heat as it is forced induction. Turbo applications run much more boost. Even from the factory, more then 10psi (usually) where a SCed application can be as little as 5psi.

As far as water injection, I've heard way more people talk about it then actually do it. I've peaked under the hood of many performance cars and non of them have water injection. It would probably work better for a drag race application where prechecks are done before every run. Imagine running out of water on the street and running out.

Keep in mind that the TRD S/C was only designed for the 2003-2004 9th gen US Corolla only. The earlier 8th gen Corollas can not use them without extensive modifications (most go with a turbocharger in this case), later 9th gens could adapt the S/C - but only with a custom fabricated spacer for the intake manifold.

Is it because of not enough room in engine bay (from what I read) or more than just that?

CanadianDriver ran an article about a Winnipeg-area Toyota dealer adapted this SC into a 05 Corolla CE. Sure they got factory help.