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Showing results for 'faulty a c high pressure switch on corolla'.

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Found 2 results

  1. Looks like my high pressure switch on the A/C high pressure line of my Corolla 1994 has to be replace. Electricity doesn’t get to the compressor because this faulty switch told me the dealer. Can I buy the switch and replace it myself ? Can it be replace without taking out the R134A A/C gas? Thanks for your advice
  2. Could be a bunch of reasons why the system is short cycling. Since the condition has deteriorated / changed, makes diagnosing it that much harder. Could be anything from a bad clutch, bad ECT switch, too much charge, too little charge, bad compressor lock switch, faulty HVAC control, bad A/C amplifier, faulty relays, etc. Pressures for the A/C system - low side is 0.15-0.25 MPa (22 - 36 PSI), high side is 1.36-1.55 MPa (200 - 225 PSI) - but those are read while the engine is running, system engaged. When the compressor is not on, can't really see what is going on. Things that are normal - when the A/C engages, it should load your engine down somewhat. The engine should respond by increasing the idle speed - but on a smaller displacement engine like the Corolla - the A/C system could easily use 20%-25% of the available engine power. Only have the fan for the radiator (some had two side by side fans) - the fan pulls the air through both the condensor and radiator. Of course, at speed, high pressure air under the nose of the car will help keep things cool.
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