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jboogs1zzfe

Turbo Charging My 1zzfe 2000 Corolla

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ok here is the thing i am making a custom manifold for a t3/t4 turbo charger 57 trim i want to run about 8 psi and acording to the local shops aroud here they say its fine but i dont know exactly what else i will need i am looking at an apexi safc2 and other things to add to it any help would be great ( i want to beat my brothers 94 celica 7afte ) lol thanks for the help

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trap

I was considering turbocharging my engine a while back, but I'm not sure if the cost is worth the gains. The 1ZZ-FE engines are fairly well optimized. Most turbocharged 8th gen Corollas I've seen usually put out only 20-25 more HP (about 140-145 HP overall). To get some serious road power, you need at least 170 HP. The turbo will certainly make a difference in your performance and you will beat your brother, but you got to ask youself if its worth it for $1000+ dollars. Also, a turbocharger can really hurt your MPG on these cars. A friend of mine lost about 5 MPG on average by turbocharging his Civic. Another thing to consider is that a turbocharger on an engine not designed for it will wear down the engine faster.

 

The only other cheap option is weight reductions (what I've done). Here's a list of things you can do:

 

Lightweight wheels = about 40-44 lbs drop (going from 20lbs steel OEMs to 9-10 lightweights)

Lightweight Battery = about 40 lbs drop (going from a 50lbs battery to a 10lbs one)

Remove jack+spare (use descretion on this one!) = about 35 lbs drop

Remove windshield wash fluid (advise not doing in winter) = about 14 lbs drop

Drive on 1/4 gas = about 50 lbs drop

 

In all, these options can drop your weight by almost 150 lbs.

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I was considering turbocharging my engine a while back, but I'm not sure if the cost is worth the gains. The 1ZZ-FE engines are fairly well optimized. Most turbocharged 8th gen Corollas I've seen usually put out only 20-25 more HP (about 140-145 HP overall). To get some serious road power, you need at least 170 HP. The turbo will certainly make a difference in your performance and you will beat your brother, but you got to ask youself if its worth it for $1000+ dollars. Also, a turbocharger can really hurt your MPG on these cars. A friend of mine lost about 5 MPG on average by turbocharging his Civic. Another thing to consider is that a turbocharger on an engine not designed for it will wear down the engine faster.

 

The only other cheap option is weight reductions (what I've done). Here's a list of things you can do:

 

Lightweight wheels = about 40-44 lbs drop (going from 20lbs steel OEMs to 9-10 lightweights)

Lightweight Battery = about 40 lbs drop (going from a 50lbs battery to a 10lbs one)

Remove jack+spare (use descretion on this one!) = about 35 lbs drop

Remove windshield wash fluid (advise not doing in winter) = about 14 lbs drop

Drive on 1/4 gas = about 50 lbs drop

 

In all, these options can drop your weight by almost 150 lbs.

Does 150 pounds less weight make that much of a difference?

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Sorry, I meant to say 183 lbs. I think I forgot to add the jack+spare when calculating. So far I've performed all of these weight reduction techniques, except for the battery. I'm looking around for a good one that's the right size and will fit under my hood.

 

Bikeman: We've already discussed this many times. Yes it does. Are you telling me you don't feel a difference in acceleration when you have a passenger in the car? Just with my sister in the car (she is 130 lbs), I can feel a fairly significant difference. On slow accelerations you don't notice it, but on hard accelerations you do. Performance wise, I would say the weight reductions can lower your 0-60 time by about 1 second or more. 180 lbs is actually more like a passenger plus a small child or a pet. Once I put the lightweight battery in, I'm hoping to drop my 0-60 time down to 9.5 seconds or maybe less.

Edited by Brendon

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Sorry, I meant to say 183 lbs. I think I forgot to add the jack+spare when calculating. So far I've performed all of these weight reduction techniques, except for the battery. I'm looking around for a good one that's the right size and will fit under my hood.

 

Bikeman: We've already discussed this many times. Yes it does. Are you telling me you don't feel a difference in acceleration when you have a passenger in the car? Just with my sister in the car (she is 130 lbs), I can feel a fairly significant difference. On slow accelerations you don't notice it, but on hard accelerations you do. Performance wise, I would say the weight reductions can lower your 0-60 time by about 1 second or more. 180 lbs is actually more like a passenger plus a small child or a pet.

I very seldom have passengers in my car and when I do I drive slower so they don't get scared.

I don't race my car so a few seconds of time off the quarter mile doesn't make much difference to me.

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I was considering turbocharging my engine a while back, but I'm not sure if the cost is worth the gains. The 1ZZ-FE engines are fairly well optimized. Most turbocharged 8th gen Corollas I've seen usually put out only 20-25 more HP (about 140-145 HP overall). To get some serious road power, you need at least 170 HP. The turbo will certainly make a difference in your performance and you will beat your brother, but you got to ask youself if its worth it for $1000+ dollars. Also, a turbocharger can really hurt your MPG on these cars. A friend of mine lost about 5 MPG on average by turbocharging his Civic. Another thing to consider is that a turbocharger on an engine not designed for it will wear down the engine faster.

 

The only other cheap option is weight reductions (what I've done). Here's a list of things you can do:

 

Lightweight wheels = about 40-44 lbs drop (going from 20lbs steel OEMs to 9-10 lightweights)

Lightweight Battery = about 40 lbs drop (going from a 50lbs battery to a 10lbs one)

Remove jack+spare (use descretion on this one!) = about 35 lbs drop

Remove windshield wash fluid (advise not doing in winter) = about 14 lbs drop

Drive on 1/4 gas = about 50 lbs drop

 

In all, these options can drop your weight by almost 150 lbs.

 

That must have been tunned pretty badly because the TRD SCer got near 175BHP. 140HP is the Celica's rating from the factory.

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well in my case i am hoping adding about 50 to 70 hp so thats what i am shooting for its not unheard of i mean the mr-s puts down about 175 - 200 hp mildly tuned with a turbo about 8 psi and as far as the durability well as long as i get about 50k out of it before i build the block and heads it was well worth it the car has about 185k on it now so i am not going to complain if it only get 25k i wil be happy gas mileage well as long as i get atleast 20 to 25 mpg we are ok still happy just not 10 mpg (explorer eewww) lol

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well in my case i am hoping adding about 50 to 70 hp so thats what i am shooting for its not unheard of i mean the mr-s puts down about 175 - 200 hp mildly tuned with a turbo about 8 psi and as far as the durability well as long as i get about 50k out of it before i build the block and heads it was well worth it the car has about 185k on it now so i am not going to complain if it only get 25k i wil be happy gas mileage well as long as i get atleast 20 to 25 mpg we are ok still happy just not 10 mpg (explorer eewww) lol

 

 

That should be doable. Before you start though, I'd find out how much air the stock air meter can read, then find out what injectors fit that are a upgrade, and then talk with other turbo Corolla guys and ask what they did. In the end, you will need a SAFC or other piggy back computer to lie to the ECU about air intakes. You will need a wide band o2 sensor to tune your are fuel ratios, a ungraded fuel pump, and a APFR that works works with boost. I'm sure I'm forgetting a laundry list of stuff. Oh ya, a boost gage, boost controller, and obviously the custom turbo install.

 

I personally wouldn't want to take on this task, but if your car is already paid for and it's what you have to work with, then you gotta do what you gotta do. Or at least what you want to do. If you do this and tune it will, you will find your clutch useless, your brakes weak, and probably the suspension not up to the task. I have and had fast cars that started out way faster then the Corolla, and even with them, I was always chasing down weak points in the car to deal with the extra power.

 

Good luck. Your going to need it.

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I was considering turbocharging my engine a while back, but I'm not sure if the cost is worth the gains. The 1ZZ-FE engines are fairly well optimized. Most turbocharged 8th gen Corollas I've seen usually put out only 20-25 more HP (about 140-145 HP overall). To get some serious road power, you need at least 170 HP. The turbo will certainly make a difference in your performance and you will beat your brother, but you got to ask youself if its worth it for $1000+ dollars. Also, a turbocharger can really hurt your MPG on these cars. A friend of mine lost about 5 MPG on average by turbocharging his Civic. Another thing to consider is that a turbocharger on an engine not designed for it will wear down the engine faster.

 

The only other cheap option is weight reductions (what I've done). Here's a list of things you can do:

 

Lightweight wheels = about 40-44 lbs drop (going from 20lbs steel OEMs to 9-10 lightweights)

Lightweight Battery = about 40 lbs drop (going from a 50lbs battery to a 10lbs one)

Remove jack+spare (use descretion on this one!) = about 35 lbs drop

Remove windshield wash fluid (advise not doing in winter) = about 14 lbs drop

Drive on 1/4 gas = about 50 lbs drop

 

In all, these options can drop your weight by almost 150 lbs.

 

I have a problem with your numbers. For the windshield fluid to weigh 14 lbs you would have to have almost 2 gallons on board. Last I checked Prizms / Corollas only have a washer tank capacity of a little over a gallon.

Edited by K_Watson

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well as for the suspension i have that covered i have fully adjustable coil overs and sport shocks and a camber kit on the way oh and i have a strut bar also the car has some modification turbo is the last thing i want to do as long as i get about athe 13 to 15 sec range in the 1/4 mile i am happy i am just not sure of the parts that i need to turbo my car i mean i have done civics but needless to say i think everyone else has too.... here is a good ? how many turbo corollas do you see? right

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I removed my windshield wash fluid during the summer. I figured it was about 2 gallons since I filled a 5 gallon bucket about 2/5 of the way up.

 

By the way, what year Corolla is this?

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Wouldn't it be faster, cheaper, and cleaner, just to trade your rolla in for a faster car?

Unless there are kits out there, sounds like a lot of fab work (= lots of $$).

 

2bits

tdk

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There are quite a few turbo'd 1ZZFE out there - a fair number are Corollas - the rest are the MR2/MRS. Celicas, and Matrixes.

 

Picking the right turbo is one big part of the equation - the other is fitting the exhaust manifold (remember that is close to the firewall) - might have to move the powersteering lines and heater core coolant lines for clearance. Log fuel rail would definitely clean up the look, will have to upgrade the injectors even with a mild boost - same goes for the fuel pump. Even though the OEM might support 6-8 PSI of boost, you definitely don't want to run the risk of running lean and burnign a valve or piston. Need to decide up front if you need to modify the fuel system from a returnless style to a return one.

 

Think about adding some extra oil capacity (remote filter, kicked out oil pan, etc. - OEM capacity of 3.9 quarts is going to be strained with the turbo + any oil feeds you are going to run to cool it with) - depending on your budget, you might also want to consider running a dry sump oil system (really ony worthwhile if you see a lot of track time). Might even consider beefing up the oil pump as well.

 

Definitely need to run a wideband, air/fuel management w/timing control a plus (remember that yours is VVT-i, not all AFCs understand that system), EGT monitoring a plus (helpful for inline tuning), heavy running will definitely benefit from a turbo timer as well. Dyno tuning is worth ever penny. Not only will you maximize the potential for power gains, you also minimize the potential for disaster with a bad fuel/air/ignition map.

 

As for getting 50K miles out of turb'd block - even with a proper tune, very unlikely to happen with OEM components. I've seen a few with almost 30K miles, but most have been built up to a degree internally. I'm mean some haven't even been able to get 50K-60K out of an OEM setup.

 

If you done others - then Toyota shouldn't be an issue - just need to get a AFC that understands the timing on the your system to help pull spark when needed.

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