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Timing Chain Tensioner Location


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#1 Bull6791

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 10:38 AM

Can somebody tell me where the timing chain tensioner is located. Do you have to take of the engine and valve cover to get to it or can you get to it with out these covers off.
On the 05 corolla I thought the valve cover was a plastic cover under the engine cover where the spark plugs go. Now if you take the valve cover off is it recommended to replace the gasket before you put it back on. Also should you get the oem gasket
Thanks
Frank

#2 autotech2612

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 01:50 PM

I have no idea.  I know someone will chime in (likely Fish).  To extend your post, does anyone know if you have to change the chain at any point?  Or, is it maintenance-free for the life of the car?

 

Surprised this car has a chain, as a lot of imports use a timing belt.


#3 dom

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 10:14 PM

You can replace just the timing chain tensioner O-ring if it's leaking oil... Timing chain tensioner is on the back of cylinder head, close to serpentine belt tensioner. No need to remove valve cover. Remove the two nuts with 10mm closed-end wrench or deep socket.

 

Follow steps 20, 31, and 36 © only: 14-086 chain sub-assy (1zz-fe) replacement

 

Toyota O-ring part # 90301-22013: http://www.toyomotor...013_ring-o.html

 

O-ring dimensions are: 22.4mm ID X 3.5mm thick (29.4mm OD)... You may be able to find one at a hydraulics supply distributor.


Edited by dom, 09 September 2013 - 11:29 PM.

#4 fishexpo101

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 10:07 AM

There was a pretty decent DIY on this forum - for a 2001 Chevy Prism, but the work is essentially identical for all 1ZZ-FE engines. 

http://www.corolland...-tensioner-diy/

 

Dom's right - usually the tensioner is fine, just the o-ring shrunk, causing it to leak.  If you have a difficult time finding the right o-ring or don't feel the tensioner looks right - just replace the tensioner.  From the dealership + o-ring, set me back about $28.  Many have been able to get that even cheaper.

 

You don't have to remove the valvecover - though usually, when the tensioner starts leaking (most after 100K miles) - might be worthwhile to remove the valvecover and replace the grommets and o-ring around there as well.  The valvecover may not be leaking yet - but since you are right there, might as well change them.  Allow gives you access to check valve clearances - let you access the condition of the the end of the engine as well. 

 

Replacing the tensioner is pretty much plug and play - the only tricky part is getting the tensioner to release the plunger from the "hook".  Once you look at some pictures of the tensioner, you'll understand.  Having the valvecover off - you can visually see the plunger release as well as hear it snap in position. 

 

If you feel uncomfortable in removing the valvecover - you can easily do this with the valvecover in place - just have to wiggle the crankshaft back and forth to dislodge the hook and listen for the popping noise.

 

As for timing chain lifespan - as long as you stay on top of the maintenance - should last the life of the car.  There is no set replacement interval on the chain - just audible checks.  Note that this is an interference engine - so when it lets go, valve damage is very likely.  Should you be worried - nope - just change the oil on regular intervals and note any unusual or excessive chain noise.  Proactively replacing the chain is no guarantee that you will avoid chain breakage.  Could be a sprocket that loses teeth, or the chain guides wearing out and eating the chain, timing chain tensioner could get stuck and wear out the chain or put too much slack in it.  Once the engine gets up to 200K or 250K miles - then I'd say it be worthwhile to tear into it and see if the chain is overly stretched out.  Remember that there have been a number of 300K+ mile Corollas with the original chain still on there.  I wouldn't worry too much about the chain.


Edited by fishexpo101, 09 September 2013 - 10:13 AM.

#5 Bull6791

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 11:22 AM

Fish
Too see if I got it:
When I buy new timing chain tensioner from dealer it comes in the open position.
I have to retract it buy pushing it in.
Then I put the hook on to lock it in.
Take the old one off with 10 mm socket.
Put new one on same way.
When I do it I will have valve cover off to see better.
When new one is bolted on must pop it open and in the open position it sits under timing chaining to keep tension on chain.
Now did I get process right.
If I did something wrong how will I know. What will happen when I start the car.

Also I guess there is only a couple of bolts to take off valve cover. And I thought every time you take off valve cover It was recommend to replace gasket.
Thanks for info Frank

#6 fishexpo101

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 11:40 AM

Sounds like you got the gist of it.  Valvecover off is by choice - you can do it with it still on, just have to make sure you hear the "click" or "pop" when the hook unlatches from the plunger.  Definitely don't want to start the car if the tensioner is not "open".  I forget how many bolts there are on the valvecover - but there quite a few.  Some may not be 100% obvious, as they could be holding down a bracket - one of them is the stud that attaches to the plastic engine cover.  Generally recommended to always replace the o-ring and grommets on the valvecover when it is off.  Also, you need to put a dab of FIPG material on the joint between the head and timing cover.  It will be pretty obvious, as there is likely to be a big glob of stuff on there from the factory. 

 

Before we get too far - is your tensioner leaking?  You have close the amount of miles where this might start leaking, but don't change it for the sake of changing it, unless it is already leaking.  Some have well over a 100K+ miles with the original timing tensioner still on the car.  You gain nothing if this is preventative maintenance - in fact, you could cause damage if the installation was incorrect.


Edited by fishexpo101, 09 September 2013 - 11:43 AM.

#7 Bull6791

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 12:10 PM

Fish,
Is FIPG MATERIAL same as RTV. I never heard of FIPG material before. I have used rtv gasket material. So what is FIPG.
Also from what I know the new gasket for valve cover just pops in and you do not have to glue it in.
Thanks Frank

Edited by Bull6791, 09 September 2013 - 12:16 PM.

#8 fishexpo101

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 01:20 PM

Little different material - FIPG (Form in Place Gasket).  Some FIPG are sold as "RTV" but not all "RTV" can be classified as a FIPG replacement.  You can get the Toyota branded stuff or get the three-bond or Permatex alternatives for a fraction of the price / exact same stuff.  Just make sure it says FIPG material - might also say black silicone or liquid gasket or gasket maker on there.  If you can't find any - get the Toyota stuff - part number 00295-00130 - runs about $15-$20 per 3oz.

 

Correct, the valvecover uses an o-ring - not the old fashioned cork/rubber gasket.  So it just pops into a groove on the bottom of the valvecover.  For this - I'd stick with OEM parts - since people only tend to replace them every 100K miles or so.  Not much difference in price either - I think both run about $20-$25.


#9 Bull6791

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 03:17 PM

Fish
Thanks for all the info on timing chain tensioner and valve cover. I am slowly approaching 100k so I want to keep an eye on timing chain tensioner.
Also I agree with you Toyota fipg stuff is real expensive. I might try three-bond or permatex like you said. Permatex has so many products.
I found Permatex Ultra Black maximum oil resistance RTV silicon gasket maker. It says it is for valve cover and timing covers I guess it will work
Thanks again
Frank

#10 dom

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 11:21 PM

9th generation Corolla timing chain inspection: http://www.testroete... Inspection.pdf

 

Permatex® Ultra Black® is the right choice: http://www.permatex....et-maker-detail

 

I'm still on original timing chain, tensioner and O-ring at 162,000 miles... I adjusted all 16 valve clearances at 100,000 miles, with 7 new lifters and by switching the others around. All were still within spec range, but some were close to maximum clearance spec and ticking a bit. All valve clearances had increased slightly since checked at 60,000 miles.

 

Valve cover gasket: http://www.rockauto....,parttype,10710

 

Timing chain tensioner: http://www.rockauto....5,parttype,5736

 

After reinstalling tensioner, turn the crankshaft counter clockwise to disconnect the plunger knock pin from the hook.

 

(Steps 20, 31, and 36 ©) 14-086 chain sub-assy (1zz-fe) replacement


Edited by dom, 10 September 2013 - 12:39 AM.

#11 Bull6791

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 05:44 AM

Dom
Dom I am hearing mixed reviews about the Permatex brand fipg. Did you ever use the one by three-bond I wanted to know how that worked. They probably all work the same
Thanks
Frank

#12 fishexpo101

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 05:00 PM

Toyota branded stuff is supposedly exactly the same as the Three-Bond material.  Can be harder to find - hence lots of people recommend Permatex - heck, I can pick up some of it at Target. 

 

Permatex - I've used those for many applications, no problems at all.  Just follow the instructions, remember that a little goes a long way - should be good to go. 

 

Lately - I've been using Permatex Ultra Grey High Torque or Permatex Right Stuff gasket maker - works just like the Prematex Ultra Black, but these setup a bit faster (15 minutes / hour - vs two hours for tack free on the Ultra Black).