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Cv Joint Boot Replacement ... 90 Corolla


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#1 wam

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Posted 28 February 2008 - 06:14 PM

I checked under my 90 Corolla today and see that there is a glob of grease that has run out of the boot on the outer CV joint. The book is just starting to crack, but I definitely need to get it fixed. The car has about 90k miles on it and is a one owner.

Is it a difficult job to replace the outer CV joint boot?

Thanks

#2 HntnFsh

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Posted 28 February 2008 - 06:37 PM

With the price of axles anymore I usually just replace the whole cv axle.
Boots can be more of a pain than they are worth.

Axles really arent that hard if your a bit mechanically inclined.

A lot of places will install them for $150 - $170 now.all parts included.Not a bad deal.

#3 Bikeman982

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Posted 28 February 2008 - 11:46 PM

The outside one is fairly easy to change.
Take off the wheel and the center cap, cotter pin, castle nut, and axle nut.
Disconnect the two bolts and one nut from the control arm.
Tap the axle out of the wheel bearing and then hold it up with a cord.
Remove the boot clamps and slide it off (may need cleaning first).
Replace in the reverse order.

#4 doubletrouble

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Posted 29 February 2008 - 06:18 AM

just remember that you need a 30mm socket on a breaker bar and a pipe to get the axle nut off or a good impact wrench. you also need a torque wrench to put it back on. 130 foot pounds. both are available at auto zone under the tool loaner program. once you do one ,its pretty easy and now you know how to change axles ,struts , hubs , ball joints ,tie rods , and almost all your suspension components . they all tie right into that a-arm that your axle boot is a part of.

#5 wam

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Posted 03 March 2008 - 10:54 AM

Thanks,

Does the tie-rod end need to be removed, and if so, is there a tool that I can rent to remove it?

wam

#6 Bikeman982

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Posted 03 March 2008 - 01:42 PM

Thanks,

Does the tie-rod end need to be removed, and if so, is there a tool that I can rent to remove it?

wam

Does not need to be removed.
If you do remove it - leave the nut loose and tap it with a hammer.
Putting it back on requires a special tool, but I just use a "C-clamp".
Hope this helps.

#7 wam

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 01:20 AM

I'm a little confused, so I got the factory service manual for my 90 Corolla. Bikeman said to "Tap the axle out of the wheel bearing and then hold it up with a cord. Remove the boot clamps and slide it off (may need cleaning first). Replace in the reverse order.

That sounds easy enough ... but, do I need to remove the outer CV joint, snap rings, etc. to get the outer CV joint boot off? Or, do I need to remove the entire axle and then take both CV boots off to do the job? I've never done this type of repair, so that's why all the questions. I hope they don't sound too stupid.

#8 wam

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 01:45 AM

PS. I don't know if it makes a difference, but I have the "Saginaw-type" front axles on my 90 Corolla ... vs the "Toyota-type", according to the manual. Looks like the main difference is in the number of bellows on the CV joint boots, and the type of clamps used on the boots. The Saginaw-type uses clamps that look like they take a special tool to remove, while the Toyota-type look like they use a regular screwdriver to remove.

#9 fishexpo101

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 09:56 AM

Are you just trying to replace the boot or the whole axle assembly? Depending on the number of miles on the car and what your plans are for it in the long run - I would rather replace the whole axle than messing with disassembling anything.

But yeah, the only real difference between the Saginaw type and the Toyota type is with the clamps (Toyota can be pryed apart, Saginaw have to be cut off).

#10 wam

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 10:27 AM

The car has about 85k on it and is a one-owner vehicle. I plan to keep it for a while. I was going to just replace the outer boot, if possible. So far, I haven't had any noises or other vibrations from the CV joints. The main reason I didn't consider replacing the whole axle with a new one, is that I've heard that the new ones aren't as reliable as the factory ones. I can imagine that one from the factory would cost a lot. Would it be a major job to just replace the outer CV joint boot?

#11 fishexpo101

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 10:38 AM

Not really a major job - comparatively speaking - I would only just replace the boot if the rip in the boot just happened. Doesn't take very long for moisture and dirt to get into a cracked boot and start giving you headaches. I agree that some aftermarket axles are probably not as well made as they could be - but you can find OEM axles at a very reasonable cost. This will take away alot of the "what ifs" - since it will be prepacked with the proper lube, and have fresh boots (you don't have to worry about the other boot going bad).

If the boot just cracked recently - I mean you could even go the route of a quick boot as a temporary solution. Replacing it with a factory style boot - would just mean that you need to pick up a few extra tools (snap ring pliers, have vise would be very handy, some side cutters to chop the clamp off, etc.) I would just check to make sure that there is no play in the CV joint (take the whole axle off the car and clamp it into a vise and start tugging on it), before you spend the time to replace the boot.

#12 TRCar54

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 10:45 AM

Wam,

I know nothing about the 1990 Corolla but will relate my experience with the 1995. I replaced both sides with aftermarket "new" rather than remanufactured. I started with remanufactured and had nothing but trouble with them. The remans were $59 and the new were $79 at Advance Auto Parts (Parts America).

Good luck,
Jay in MA

The car has about 85k on it and is a one-owner vehicle. I plan to keep it for a while. I was going to just replace the outer boot, if possible. So far, I haven't had any noises or other vibrations from the CV joints. The main reason I didn't consider replacing the whole axle with a new one, is that I've heard that the new ones aren't as reliable as the factory ones. I can imagine that one from the factory would cost a lot. Would it be a major job to just replace the outer CV joint boot?


#13 wam

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 12:33 AM

Looks like the best thing to do, is replace the entire right-side half-shaft with a new one .... probably from NAPA or Advance Auto. Back to one of my first questions: Do I need to remove the tie-rod end to do this repair?

The reason I ask again, is because the FSM says to, plus the online repair manual at AutoZone also says to. I don't have the special tools to remove the tie-rod end, so it may be the difference between me doing the work myself, or taking it to the shop.

#14 TRCar54

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 07:25 AM

If the 90 suspension is anything like the gen 7 you won't need to remove the tie rod.

The tool(s) required to pull a tie rod end are not very expensive....generally less than $20 and they are always available as part of the tool loaner program at the major chains.

My advice....if you are able to do the repairs and they are not available as loaners, treat yourself to the tools as a reward for saving money. Buy decent quality tools, take care of them and try not to loan them out unless a disclaimer is clear about breakage, loss etc.

Good luck,
Jay in MA


Looks like the best thing to do, is replace the entire right-side half-shaft with a new one .... probably from NAPA or Advance Auto. Back to one of my first questions: Do I need to remove the tie-rod end to do this repair?

The reason I ask again, is because the FSM says to, plus the online repair manual at AutoZone also says to. I don't have the special tools to remove the tie-rod end, so it may be the difference between me doing the work myself, or taking it to the shop.


#15 doubletrouble

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 07:54 AM

Looks like the best thing to do, is replace the entire right-side half-shaft with a new one .... probably from NAPA or Advance Auto. Back to one of my first questions: Do I need to remove the tie-rod end to do this repair?

The reason I ask again, is because the FSM says to, plus the online repair manual at AutoZone also says to. I don't have the special tools to remove the tie-rod end, so it may be the difference between me doing the work myself, or taking it to the shop.


this was from my 93. the process is the same but this included the whole hub.

the drivers axle is not hard with the whole assembly. Remember to get an a.b.s. axle if you car has a.b.s. brakes.you can use an a.b.s. axle on a non a.b.s. car like I am doing. Jack up the whole front end .but make the side you are replacing much higher or you will spill a quart of trans fluid You do need the 30 mm socket to get the axle loose. I took the same bolts off.Start with the caliper and brake carrier .2, 17 mm bolts. hang the caliper out of the way with wire . Make sure your caliper sliders move in and out or pop them out and take a drill with a brush and clean the holes out with brake clean or de-greaser. Clean the sliders and re-grease them. Take the rotor off if possible. Now take the 2 strut bolts , the speed sensor on a.b.s. cars if you have one , the cotter pin and tie rod bolt . Now the axle and spindle with the hub will be loose. Take your jack handle or pry bar and slip it between the flange on the axle and the differential. do the bottom first or start where the flange is the largest. work your way around or if the whole car is on jack stands, rotate the assembly until you see the larger part of the flange. the axle will pop when the c-clip on its end lets loose. you still have to work it out another inch or so until you can pull it out.
When you set the new assembly in place, make sure the c-clip on the differential end of the shaft is tight . take a pliers and squeeze it if unsure. make sure the open end of this clip faces down .this coincides with the way the factory installed them and it will go in much easier. pick the whole axle, . pull the strut out of the way . line up the strut mount on the newer assembly facing up to match up with the strut and the axle clip facing down. push the assembly into the differential hole and wiggle it a bit.It will be about an inch or less from being fully seated. you can either tap the axle end or steadily push the spindle in and when the c-clip seats you will hear it pop in place. now you need to check because sometimes its not all the way in. another half inch and you're all set. have the strut bolts close by because you're going to have to hold this heavy assembly up while you put the bolt back in. if you lost trans fluid the remove the upper differential bolt on the rear of the differential and get a pump bottle like you use for outboard lower units to fill it
Whew ,the hard part is done. reverse what you did before.tighten the 2 Strut bolts, , tie rod nut and cotter pin, put the rotor on ,mount the carries ,put the pads in , put the slider bolts back in. I am a freak and use anti-seize on almost every bolt. it makes it much easier for the next (if ever) repair. put the tire on and lower the car. put steady pressure on your brake pedal a couple times to push fluid back in so you have brakes.