I Must Have! Rwd Toyota.

fishexpo101

I know Karate, Kung Fu, and 47 other dangerous wor
That would be pretty sweet - especially if they can hit that price point or get very close to it. I won't hold my breath though - as this RWD rumor has been floating around for a while - I'll believe it when the test mule comes out.

 

Bitter

New member
just go grab a used mr-2
the 3sgte is better than just about all the current toyota motors out there. hell i'd even say that the A series are better than the Z series (save for the 2zz) when it comes to modding. the Z series are stretched thin and high strung.

 

twinky64

New member
Negatory, get the J series off of a supra, the twin turbo! I cannot believe toyota scrapped that engine, probably all politics anyways. "O look, we over-engineered the ufck out of this, lets scrap it!"

 

twinky64

New member
That would be pretty sweet - especially if they can hit that price point or get very close to it. I won't hold my breath though - as this RWD rumor has been floating around for a while - I'll believe it when the test mule comes out.
The previous generation of IS (1999-2003 i think) is really close to the same size as the 8th gen corolla. I think they should just use that chassis as a means of cutting cost (ie. redesigning the wheel is a waste of time for a corolla)

 

gvr4ever

New member
Negatory, get the J series off of a supra, the twin turbo! I cannot believe toyota scrapped that engine, probably all politics anyways. "O look, we over-engineered the ufck out of this, lets scrap it!"
Maybe it didn't meet emissions anymore. Now days turbo's have a pre cat, and two cats after the turbo. I'm actually kind of surprised they still make descent power. I do think they've been slowed down a tad tho. I've been in the STi's and SRT-4s and for having a 2.4 in them, they really feel held back.

The Supra NA engine was used in the IS300's, so they sort of kept it alive. I've never been in a TT Supra, but I bet they were/are fun. Especially with some basic mods.

 

Bitter

New member
meh, the J series are nice, but theyre not toyotas only amazing engine. the 4AGx series and the S series has some screamers. the Beams 3S-GE, the blacktop 20 valve 4A-GE, and of course the 3S-GTE which i would hold in the same regards as a 4G63.

 

fishexpo101

I know Karate, Kung Fu, and 47 other dangerous wor
I'd take a Celica All-trac over a Supra personally. Both have amazing engine potential - but the Celica would be able to put it down better on the pavement than the Supra, with all-wheel vs RWD. Plus not many places, short of the track, that you can legally exercise the legs on the Supra. A FR/FF Corolla/Levin or MR2 would be a close choice afterward. Would make a perfect DD - enough room for my stuff, cheap to upkeep, dependable, and can add some "excitement" to my daily commute as the need arise. Coming from past experience with big Detroit Iron - I'm smitten by Toyota's lighter and more manuverable G-series and S-series "economy" cars with lots of tuning potential.

Don't get me wrong, like Bitter mentioned, the J-series are fabulous pieces of engineering - like 600WHP+ with a stock bottom end, but the amount of money dumped into it to make impressive amounts of power - one can easily be dumped into a SBC with similar mods and make more power. Like the old saying goes - no replacement for displacement.

Some people have taken that to the extreme and tried to shoehorn the 1UZ-FE 4.0L V8 from a Lexus LS400 (an engine that also has show tremendous potential - blown variants have dyno'd at 1000WHP+ !!!) into an 8th gen Corolla - unsuccessfully.

 

gvr4ever

New member
The problem with both of them, is they cost too much used. I rather have a barly used vette at this point. Also, I've heard from a few people that have worked on a all trac celica, that the engine needs to be dropped to get the trans out. We have STi's and EVOs now. Why spend so much money on a older car that really didn't put out that much power.

I just hope Toyota truly builds a new RWD car that starts around 16K. I rather it have a 2.4 then a 1.8, but for that kind of cash, it would prolly have a 1.8 in it.

 

Bitter

New member
I'd take a Celica All-trac over a Supra personally. Both have amazing engine potential - but the Celica would be able to put it down better on the pavement than the Supra, with all-wheel vs RWD. Plus not many places, short of the track, that you can legally exercise the legs on the Supra. A FR/FF Corolla/Levin or MR2 would be a close choice afterward. Would make a perfect DD - enough room for my stuff, cheap to upkeep, dependable, and can add some "excitement" to my daily commute as the need arise. Coming from past experience with big Detroit Iron - I'm smitten by Toyota's lighter and more manuverable G-series and S-series "economy" cars with lots of tuning potential.
Don't get me wrong, like Bitter mentioned, the J-series are fabulous pieces of engineering - like 600WHP+ with a stock bottom end, but the amount of money dumped into it to make impressive amounts of power - one can easily be dumped into a SBC with similar mods and make more power. Like the old saying goes - no replacement for displacement.

Some people have taken that to the extreme and tried to shoehorn the 1UZ-FE 4.0L V8 from a Lexus LS400 (an engine that also has show tremendous potential - blown variants have dyno'd at 1000WHP+ !!!) into an 8th gen Corolla - unsuccessfully.
but someone pulled it off in a 6th gen celica
theres a little more engine bay depth to work with. search and ye shall find.

 

Bikeman982

Bikeman982
Does that mean back to long drive shafts, differentials, and problemsome U-joints??

 
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gvr4ever

New member
Does that mean back to long drive shafts, differentials, and problemsome U-joints??
Lexus has had RWD for awhile now. I think Toyota knows how to do it right. What problems did Toyota have the first time? I've never heard of rear end complaints. I was on the forums trying to find one, but no luck. One of my friends had a RWD Celica that made it to 250+K miles. Aside from hitting a deer, I don't think it had any failures.

 

Bikeman982

Bikeman982
I haven't heard of Toyotas specifically having problems. Just RWD problems in general as a result of the drive configuration.

 

fishexpo101

I know Karate, Kung Fu, and 47 other dangerous wor
Yeah, only time I've had problems with U-joints were with thge older full sized vans and heavy trucks - since the drive shafts were so long and the u-joint straps being the weak link in that case - vehicles where the driveshaft is nearly as long as my current Corolla. Never actually had a u-joint fail, always used Super Joints, but straps were mostly crap - at least on all the big domestic ones that I've worked on. Personally - I'd take the RWD configuration for working on, space and cost wise - for "playing" with. FWD is not as mod friendly as the RWD platform. Need to change the ring gear, add a LSD - no problem, just pop off the differential in the rear, don't even need to mess with the tranny - to do that on a FWD transaxle - need to pull the tranny off, crack it open, and use some special tools to get to the differential. RWD are less troublesome now - with composite driveshafts, better suspension and chassis integration, and better materials.

 

Bikeman982

Bikeman982
One drawback to RWD vehicles is the "hump" that goes down the center to accomodate the drive shaft.

One big advantage is the handling in snow or icy roads. I got used to RWD cars and learned how to do a proper fishtail control.

 

gvr4ever

New member
One drawback to RWD vehicles is the "hump" that goes down the center to accomodate the drive shaft.One big advantage is the handling in snow or icy roads. I got used to RWD cars and learned how to do a proper fishtail control.
Our 05 Corolla has a hump in the back seat too. I don't know why tho. I don't know if it shares a floor plan with a Lexus, or if it runs fuel and brake lines or what. I haven't looked, but I noticed that the back seat had a hump in it.

I like how a RWD can be corrected, but I don't know that it's safer. I just like being pushed instead of pulled, and I like how a RWD corners. Mainly, just the lack of feel that the same wheels that turn the car aren't also powering the car. RWD usually has over steer or if not, can get over steer with some power added going around a corner. Even a great FWD with LSD isn't as fun, and RWD can take off faster then FWD. At least on dry roads anyway.

 

Bikeman982

Bikeman982
One drawback to RWD vehicles is the "hump" that goes down the center to accomodate the drive shaft.One big advantage is the handling in snow or icy roads. I got used to RWD cars and learned how to do a proper fishtail control.
Our 05 Corolla has a hump in the back seat too. I don't know why tho. I don't know if it shares a floor plan with a Lexus, or if it runs fuel and brake lines or what. I haven't looked, but I noticed that the back seat had a hump in it.

I like how a RWD can be corrected, but I don't know that it's safer. I just like being pushed instead of pulled, and I like how a RWD corners. Mainly, just the lack of feel that the same wheels that turn the car aren't also powering the car. RWD usually has over steer or if not, can get over steer with some power added going around a corner. Even a great FWD with LSD isn't as fun, and RWD can take off faster then FWD. At least on dry roads anyway.
Fuel and brake lines don't normally require enough space to need a hump. I wonder what yours is for?

 

fishexpo101

I know Karate, Kung Fu, and 47 other dangerous wor
They sometimes will still engineer that "hump" or "backbone" to help stiffen the chassis. Both my 8th gen Corolla and Matrix still have a hump in the rear seats. The exhaust sustem runs down the middle of the hump - helps clean up the bottom of the car, less bits hanging down to catch air, and mess up the flow under the car.

 

Bikeman982

Bikeman982
They sometimes will still engineer that "hump" or "backbone" to help stiffen the chassis. Both my 8th gen Corolla and Matrix still have a hump in the rear seats. The exhaust sustem runs down the middle of the hump - helps clean up the bottom of the car, less bits hanging down to catch air, and mess up the flow under the car.
Also allows them to have a car lower to the ground without sacrificing ground to car clearances.

 

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