ForumsCorollas2019-21ToyotasTech
Ti-Jean

New Corolland Forum Member...

Recommended Posts

Just to introduce myself shortly.

 

Ti-Jean, 45, from the northern banana republic of Quebec.

 

I have an Indigo blue 05 Corolla CE 5 speed with C package (AC, power package, cruise, remote). My car was assembled at Toyota's plant in Cambridge Ontario (Serial no beginning with 2) in august 04 and delivered to me in mid-september.

 

Only defect so far, has been a persistent rattle around the radio and center vents that I had fixed by the dealer.

 

Reading through the pages of the forum, I noticed a good number of very knowledgeable folks.

 

Also, please forgive my sometimes broken english as it is my second language.

 

See you on the various topics.

 

Happy new year.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Corollasroyce

Hey, sounds like your driving the exact car as me, have you noticed at all the low idle once the car is warmed up, dropping to about 400 rpms and car shakes slightly?? its a preatty common thing ive been reading about on this forum and my car does it as well, just wondering sence your car is from the same factory as mine if yours does it as well, welcome to the board...happy new year!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey, sounds like your driving the exact car as me, have you noticed at all the low idle once the car is warmed up, dropping to about 400 rpms and car shakes slightly?? its a preatty common thing ive been reading about on this forum and my car does it as well, just wondering sence your car is from the same factory as mine if yours does it as well, welcome to the board...happy new year!

No, I didn't have this problem yet (low 400 rpm idle). Only once did the car did not start first time. It was brand new, I let it idle for about 10 minutes and had a friend test drive the car for around 10-15 miles right after. The car then sat for about half an hour before it refused to start (just like another member reported). On second attempt, everything was normal. Never happened since.

 

Other little things, I find the fast idle a bit fast at around 1800 rpm (I would prefer something around 1600) and throttle tip-in is lurchy just off idle when the engine is cold and moving slowly in first gear. Is it due to the new electronic throttle on the 1ZZ-FE for 05 or an overly lean mixture? I don't know.

 

Oh, I have no imagination and just copied your signature!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Toyota-san

I would suspect that these things have a learning PCM that has to "learn" our habits.

 

I too have the funky long start when part warm, cold it fires right up. My idle is around 600 in drive; I don't have the low idle.

 

The warm start irritates me a bit, it seems like its either too rich or the PCM is taking its own sweet time gathering data from various sensors.

 

If it was the key, I would assume the car would crank longer all the time, hot or cold.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Corollasroyce,

 

If you're in Canada, what province? Did you install winter tires?

 

I put a set of Toyo G02+ of the same size (185/65-15) on a set of take-off wheels.

 

All for $712.C, taxes included.

 

Like your cars, mine always seems to crank longer than necessary before starting. Nothing alarming, always cranks between 1 and 2 seconds. warm or cold. And I always turn the key on the engine position and wait a few seconds before starting to let the pump pressurize the injectors.

 

Remember the yellow light that used to come off after 4-5 seconds on Hondas, telling when the car was ready to start. A good habit in cold weather, and I still do it. It's just that my last 99 Accord would start immediately in the morning or when warm, no cranking to speak of. Despite the fact that this particular engine had no Vtec or direct ignition (Accord DX).

 

Honda seems to nail these EFI and CPU engine glitches better.

 

Also, did you notice your idle speeding to 1200 rpm when the AC compressor engages for about 5 seconds at a time? Easy to notice while you wait at a traffic light. Even when the AC is off. As long as you have the fan on and the outside temp is at or above 0C. This feature is probably to prevent vibrations from the engine straining with the extra load at 800 rpm, like my old Accord did.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Corollasroyce

Ti-Jean:

 

I am in Edmonton, Alberta...No i am still driving on the very pathetic stock tires, they are terrible in the snow but i am going to just more cautious untill they are wore down as the car has just over 5,000 km's on it..and im not paying $600-$800 to replace tires already, i did it on my rsx and i don't feel like doing it again...Unless the weather gets really severe, then i will do it regardless, but right now its been a preatty mild winter, its only -32 here today and we havn't had any blizzards or anything yet nthis year so im going to hold off...I notice the car idles around 2000 rpm while its warming up and i always let the car sit til it drops back to about 1200-1500 before i drive it, usually only a minute or so...as for the air conditioner, i havn't even used mine yet so i can't say for sure, i ran it for like 10 mins the second day i had it to make sure it worked but it was like -10 outside so i didn't run it for long and i didn't notice anything at all with it...i'll check it out once it warms up a bit =) oh, hey you stole m signature,....heh...naw i don't care its all good default_tongue.png

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey guys also a new member, n almost the same corolla asTi-Jean except with package B with auto.

 

Im in Ontario, n got a new set of winter tires with rims for about $600

 

Works great in snow so far, Ive been zippin by all the slowpokes out there when it snows, hehe. I jus love to drive in snow its so much fun. default_smile.png

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And I always turn the key on the engine position and wait a few seconds before starting to let the pump pressurize the injectors.

Remember the yellow light that used to come off after 4-5 seconds on Hondas, telling when the car was ready to start. A good habit in cold weather, and I still do it.

I worry about doing that in cold weather because of the accessories that come on (daytime running lights, instrument lights), thereby draining juice from the battery.

 

Is it really an issue or am I worrying for no reason?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not an issue unless your charging system is weak. I know with my Honda - waiting for the fuel pump to pressurize my fuel rail was important - once you waited, like Ti-Jean said, it starts right up.

 

On the Corolla (1ZZ-FE variants) - leaving it on the run position before starting is not necessary. Its fuel pump actually doesn't even energize until the engine is cranking or running. When you shut it off - there is some residual fuel pressure left in the injector fuel log - for restarting later. But sometimes that is not enough - probably why these cars have to crank for a while before they start up.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not an issue unless your charging system is weak. I know with my Honda - waiting for the fuel pump to pressurize my fuel rail was important - once you waited, like Ti-Jean said, it starts right up.

On the Corolla (1ZZ-FE variants) - leaving it on the run position before starting is not necessary. Its fuel pump actually doesn't even energize until the engine is cranking or running. When you shut it off - there is some residual fuel pressure left in the injector fuel log - for restarting later. But sometimes that is not enough - probably why these cars have to crank for a while before they start up.

I was not aware of this fishexpo. If so, it explains why then, the engine has to crank longer.

 

tinto,

 

I always pull my handbrake 1 clic before starting my engine, thus no DRL. Good habit in winter to save juice in the battery. Overkill maybe, but can not hurt on those -25C days or short distance running.

 

Once I start rolling, generally after a few seconds to a few minutes (depending on temp), I release the lever and get my DRL.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A-ha! I always noticed the DRL were not on when the hand brake was engaged. I always have my handbrake when I'm parked (habit), so I don't need to worry about the DRL while starting (and idling). A hassle-free way to disable the DRL while driving (if you care to do that), since with one click I doubt the brake itself engages at all, thus causing no damage.

 

Mine is a 97, so I guess this delay trick for the fuel pump applies. I'll use it next time I start.

 

Thanks, gentlemen.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way, do canadian and US versions of the Corolla have the same battery and alternator?

 

I found nothing for the alternator (probably 80 or 90 Amp/hr) but my battery is a Delphi 550 CCA (Cold Crankink Amps).

 

While 2003+ Accords only have a 410 CCA battery.

 

I've noticed big 4 cyl. cars like the Mazda 6 and Altima with 590 CCA batteries.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always suspected the US and Canada versions to be the same vehicles, all built in Cambridge, Ontario. My 97 7th gen was built there. Earlier cars like my friend's 93 (also a 7th gen Corolla) was built in Japan. Now, I think all North America-bound Corollas are built here (ie Cambridge), but I'm not sure.

 

As far as the CCA goes, it depends what drop-down voltage the manufacturer uses.

 

Basically, for CCA, they test by drawing a maximum amperage from the battery at 0 degrees F (that's where the 'cold' comes in), for 30 seconds until a certain voltage, usually 11.5V (this is the lowest voltage at which a car battery can sustain the operation of the car's accessories).

 

I believe some manufacturers do this test with a drop-down voltage of only 7V, allowing them to advertise higher CCA. This sounds like the case for the high 500-rated batteries. The 410 on the Accords is probably the 'true' test (ie the one that brings the battery down to 11.5V, a voltage where the car can still function).

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

U.S. versions of the Corolla are built in Canada, California (USA), and Japan. Any version can turn up in any U.S. dealership, tho some say you are more likely to get the Canadian-built in the eastern U.S. (I did) and the Cali-built in the western U.S. Relatively few J-vins come stateside.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"The rating used to define a battery's ability to start an engine in cold temperatures is called Cold Cranking Amperage (CCA). The CCA of an auto battery is the amount of current a given battery can deliver for 30 seconds at 0 °F (-18 °C) without dropping below 7.2 volts for a 12 volt battery. To find the power of a car battery we multiply the CCA number by 7.2 volts.

 

For example, P = IV P = (600 A)(7.2 V) P = 4320W

 

Most modern cars require relatively low cold cranking amps that range from 400 to 600. Sports cars and light trucks require higher cranking amps ranging from 700 to 1000."

 

The test procedure appears to be standardised for all manufacturers. But I think that CA or Cranking Amperes also exist, from a test at a higher temperature.

 

Define the difference between MCA and CCA. MCA = CA

 

The marine cranking ampere (MCA) rating of a battery is very similar to the CCA rating; the only difference is that while the CCA is measured at a temperature of 0°F, the MCA is measured at 32°F. All other requirements are the same — the ampere draw is for 30 seconds and the end of discharge voltage in both cases is 1.20 volts per cell.

 

As for the Accord battery, it is the same as the one installed in Civics and not much bigger than a motorcycle battery. The 410 CCA then makes sense. Honda has always put small batteries in its cars.

 

And even if a canadian spec Corolla comes from the same canadian or US plant as US bound Corollas, doesn't necessarily mean that alternator, battery and starter are the same?

 

That was the reason behind my questionning of the battery and alt power of US 03+ Corollas of fellow US members of this great forum...

 

Voilà...

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"And even if a canadian spec Corolla comes from the same canadian or US plant as US bound Corolla, doesn't necessarily means that alternator, battery and starter are the same? That was the reason behind my questionning of the battery and alt power of US 03+ Corollas of fellow US members of this great forum..."

 

My battery is the same Delphi you have, but my guess is the battery could vary in every plant from week to week. I would think, though, that each car would have the same starter and alternator. There are better folks here than I to answer that, though, and I'm sure someone will be along soon with a definitive answer.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Too bad Toyota doesn't have more complete specs, like some other manufacturers.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×