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1Zz-Fe Timing Chain Tensioner Diy



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dshadle1

It was about $19.50 at www.wholesaletoyoparts.com. I was local to the dealer that runs that website and they will give you the website price if you ask for it. Maybe you have parts guys at the dealers who will bargain--just have to ask around.

What is the chance that the timing cover seal leaking? Is it hard to change this seal if it is leaking?

Also, the timing belt tensioner, how much force does it kicks out when removing the 2 bolts? I was afraid I cannot catch the bolts in time and lose it. Could I just hold tensioner while removing 2nd bolt off before letting go of the tensioner to avoid losing the bolt? I ordered the tensioner but that place only sell the extra studs but no bolts.

Thanks.

Step 2: Locate Timing Chain Tensioner

 

This question comes up a lot. The tensioner is on the back of the cylinder head near the top and on the passenger's side. It is held in by two 10 mm nuts. It has a rounded diamond shape.

The top nut:

I have a tiny bit of oil on the serpentine belt tensioner rubber part. Is that something could be leaking? Or is that just oil from something else on it?

Another question I have is does my car 1999 Corolla VE, have a MAP sensor that can be cleaned?

Thanks.

dandemedi

Step 15: Turn Crankshaft and Check Chain Tension

 

Tools Needed: 19 mm socket and ratchet

In order to release the tensioner plunger and get tension on the timing chain, you need to turn the crankshaft. I had read a couple of different things--turning clockwise or first turning counterclockwise then clockwise. I started by turning clockwise about 1/16 to 1/8 of a turn (barely any motion). Nothing happened so I turned it back about the same amount. Still nothing. I gave it a good turn clockwise again (about 1/4 turn) and heard the clicks of the plunger releasing. I looked at the timing chain and saw the shiny plunger, so I knew I had succeeded. If you are good to go, lower the car and remove jack/stands.

Plunger and Taut Chain:

http://i838.photobuc...asket/PIC19.jpg

 

Good Post,

I'm not sure if my tension is correct on my 99' Corolla. I Read your timing chain tensioner DIY, good read. I have a question regarding the timing chain. How much slack does the timing chain have normally (visually inspecting it).

I removed the valve cover on my 99' Corolla, the slack on the chain is such that you can see it. When I lift the chain from between the sprockets, it moves up like a half inch. Is this normal.

Engine makes alot of noise clacking almost like a drum roll. This started after I ran it low on oil(2 qts.low). I noticed noise after I got off freeway. Parked it got it towed, didn't want to ruin it more. I dumped Marvel Myster oil and added two qts. of 5w-30 and have ran engine parked about an hour. I don't want to drive it, it makes too much noise. The oil is now real dirty so i will change oil and put more MMO and see if that helps The car starts fine. I am leaning towards a vavle lifter. The lifters look good visually, they spin as I move them, they don't look worn on top, not dished or dented, the lobes look smooth, ther is some varnish not as much as your pics. No smoke out of tail pipe

How much MMO did you add? Personally, I would have waited a bit before adding MMO - that tends to greatly thin out the motor oil's viscosities and by itself, doesn't have much - if any - lubricative properties. MMO makes a great solvent, but not designed to protect metal parts. Couple that thin viscosity and running for an extended time while idling would have accelerated any wear the engine had.

As for the timing chain - there should be some slack in the chain. It shouldn't be so much that the chain can be lifted off the sprocket - in your cars, that amount of slack sounds about normal.

dshadle1

How much MMO did you add? Personally, I would have waited a bit before adding MMO - that tends to greatly thin out the motor oil's viscosities and by itself, doesn't have much - if any - lubricative properties. MMO makes a great solvent, but not designed to protect metal parts. Couple that thin viscosity and running for an extended time while idling would have accelerated any wear the engine had.

 

As for the timing chain - there should be some slack in the chain. It shouldn't be so much that the chain can be lifted off the sprocket - in your cars, that amount of slack sounds about normal.

Thanks for chiming in, Fish. I didn't even think to test the chain for slack after I popped the top.

For the belt tensioner, could you release the latch by using a long screwdriver instead of turning the crank? I am just asking in case turning the crank won't do it?

How much tension is on that spring plunger? When I remove the 2 nuts, could I use my hand to hold the plunger in to remove the 2 nuts so it won't shoot out and I could lose the nuts?

Thanks.

dshadle1

For the belt tensioner, could you release the latch by using a long screwdriver instead of turning the crank? I am just asking in case turning the crank won't do it?

 

How much tension is on that spring plunger? When I remove the 2 nuts, could I use my hand to hold the plunger in to remove the 2 nuts so it won't shoot out and I could lose the nuts?

Thanks.

Question 1: Yes, but I would be sure to have some good light on it.

Question 2: Remove one nut. Loosen the other, hold the back with your other hand and then grab it. When I did it, the tensioner didn't shoot off onto the floor or anything like that.

For the belt tensioner, could you release the latch by using a long screwdriver instead of turning the crank? I am just asking in case turning the crank won't do it?

How much tension is on that spring plunger? When I remove the 2 nuts, could I use my hand to hold the plunger in to remove the 2 nuts so it won't shoot out and I could lose the nuts?

Thanks.

Question 1: Yes, but I would be sure to have some good light on it.

Question 2: Remove one nut. Loosen the other, hold the back with your other hand and then grab it. When I did it, the tensioner didn't shoot off onto the floor or anything like that.

Thanks for replying. I might put a bag or a cup to catch it in case it shoots out b/c of the spring tension.

diverpilot

Thank you - everyone. And especially - thank you to the member who posted step by step instructions with photos !!!

diverpilot

Invaluable information for a non mechanic. I have a question - my VVT valve, VVT oil screen, and oil temperature all have O rings. They are not leaking. (unlike my chain tensioner) Should I replace the O rings before they leak?

My 2001 Corolla has 256,000 miles. Still runs strong.

On this generation of Corolla - if it isn't broken - don't fix it.

In the process of trying to do some preventative maintenance - you could complicate matters / make more work for yourself. Fluids and filters, wear items are another matter - but for majority of the parts on the car, address them when they start to leak, drip, make noise, etc.

diverpilot

Well - good advice. Kind of funny too because after I replaced the chain tensioner, I cleaned the VVT screen. Then I came in to wait for the RTV to cure before starting the engine and read your comments. Then I started the engine and it reved up high then died. Never did THAT before. Started it again and the same thing happened.

The third time no problems, the engine ran fine. I shut it off and later, took it for a test drive. I think it ran a little better then it did before.

On cold start up, it fast idles at about 1700 RPM, before idling down to about 800 RPM.

Here are a few questions. I tried to take the VVTi plunger out. I took one bolt on the face of the block out and then tried to pull the plunger out. It would not budge. I read the Chilton's book and they don't give any more detail. Its just the one bolt?

I have had lots of oil leaking. I just replaced the valve cover gasket and the chain tensioner. It seems to have slowed down in the two weeks since I replaced the valve cover gasket. Where would you look next?

Different subject - the auto parts store is pushing the entire strut package which includes the spring and housing and strut. Is there any advantage to purchasing the whole package verses the just the strut?

dom

It's just the one bolt holding it. It's likely just bonded on with oxidation, and can be worked loose.

See step 20: 14-052 partial engine assy (1zz-fe) overhaul

With a complete strut assembly, you don't need spring compressors to replace the strut... It comes complete with new strut, new coil spring, new strut mount, bellow and spring seat, ready to install.

http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/x,carcode,1432912,parttype,15174,a,www.google.com%2BSearch%2Bfor%2B2004%2BTOYOTA%2BCOROLLA%2B1.8L%2BL4%2BDOHC

Yup, dome is right - just one bolt holding that on. Have to be kind of careful, too much pressure and you could snap the OCV assembly for the VVTi system. There are a number of owners on the newcelica forums that have run into broken OCV assemblies. They just are a pain to remove.

I'm personally not a fan of preassembled strut assemblies. Though they make installation much easier - no spring compressor needed, as dom pointed out, they don't always use a decent spring with the strut. FCS and Monroe quick struts are attractively priced, but I've yet to hear a set make it more than a couple of years. Some softened up to the point of constantly bottoming out in a couple of months! They definitely won't hold up like your OEM setup - service life wise.

I'd check the ride height of the car - see how it sits in the corners - if it is evenly set from specs, springs are probably still OK. My 1996 Camry went almost 340K miles on the OEM springs (struts changed once) - before one coil snapped on a really cold night. My 2002 Corolla only stayed on about 40K miles - took them off and put on some TRD springs, as I needed a little firmer spring rate to fit my use of the car (pull a trailer, haul equipment to a test site, load the roof rack with a stupid amount of equipment, etc).

dom

That's not surprising. I always only replace the strut itself. The original front struts' bellow (boot) also disintegrates and rips off the stut mount, leaving the rod exposed. I replace it with aftermarket bellow which is held onto its bump stop instead. I also clean and pack the mount bearing well with grease.

adamms

Fantastic write - up... I know I'm late to the thread but I just wanted to add my own two cents default_smile

In regards to the resetting of the timing chain tensioner, the original instructions say to rotate the engine crank to get the spring arm to release... This is all correct however I don't suggest you crank the engine counter clockwise (unless its a Honda!) as it generally bad practice as it can put enormous strain on main bearings and journals and cause problems in the future with premature wear and tear - even if only cranked by hand it has the potential to upset things (this is information I learned first-hand from an engine rebuilder). Also, when I did the part where you crank the engine "clockwise", I would suggest that you keep turning the crank further than originally suggested...best thing to do here is cycle through "all four cylinders" compression stroke. I say this as I found I got an additional few "clicks" from the tensioner as I did so and I found it dramatically improved the overall performance of the running of the motor. Being a VVT-i motor (variable valve timing) I think that by going that little extra effort to turn the crank more allows the variation to settle a little better before turning the engine on. I found this improvement and I only replaced the o-ring, not the whole tensioner device Im not a trade mechanic, and what I say might be complete bollocks, but I cant understand why some mechanical guides suggest turning the crank counter clockwise to release the locking arm when you can easily release by going clockwise - these guides then go on to say only ever crank the engine clockwise to align TDC at the zero mark on the timing cover?? bit of conflicting info there..., That little extra click or two satisfied me to the point I knew the chain and timing mechanism was nice and tight - not allowing for a running motor to make the final adjustment. Hope this adds to an already great DIY guide. You saved me over $300 Toyota wanted to charge me to replace a $4.00 o-ring! default_smile

Great Post, thank you very much!