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twinky64

My car was rear ended earlier this month. So, I am looking to get a replacement. I love driving manuals but the traffic is so abysmal, i have to resort to automatic. I must say, I've had lots of memories with my 98 though I have a few complaints. The performance wasn't really that good and the brakes were kinda poor performing. That being said, I am thinking of a better performing and better braking due to my rediculous commute.

I have come to two conclusions, a 2000 or 2001 toyota celica. I've learned that the 1zzfe and 2zzge was co-engineered and designed with Lotus. And Lotus being my favorite car company, I am immediately attracted to those two engines. However, I would like to get familiar with the 2zzge as I plan on getting an Exige when I graduate. I've driven the Matrix XRS and I love how smooth the 2zz is compared to the comparably rough running and sounding 1zz.

My second conclusion is the 1995-1997 BMW 318ti e36 chassis, the hatchback (no trunk overhang) because its lighter and has folding rear seats. Its a 1.8 and most robust, most reliable, engine BMW has ever made since 1985. With 138hp and 128lb.ft. of torque, it propels the heavier than corolla (2745lbs) to 60 in just under 9seconds (like my 98 corolla). However, the skidpad is 0.85g and 60-0 braking of 127ft while the corolla has 0.76g and 137ft. The 318ti has 4 discs. Cargo area is 15cu.ft. plus the additional cargo area when the rear seats fold down. Which is good because I bike to campus since I park off campus. Also, its RWD and that is always a plus. I am a driving enthusiast and I have never owned a RWD vehicle before. Because the drag coefficient is a little higher than the corolla (.34 compared to the 98 corolla's .32), it gets 32mpg instead of 38mpg.

I respect 3 companies: Toyota, BMW, and Lotus. I have learned the toyota way of engineering, now I am eager to learn the BMW way of engineering. Study it, change things out, etc. There is plenty of aftermarket for the 318ti, which is good. One of which is lowering springs, and Bilstein struts/shocks. Hopefully that will increase the skidpad to .90g and if it requires some stickier summer tires, then so be it. Stickier tires and firmer suspension will hopefully decrease the braking distance by 5-10ft. The lowered suspension will hopefully lower the frontal area to get me an additional mpg?.....maybe not. With a CAI, headers, and Cat-back exhaust, I hope the hp rating will increase by 10% if done right and shave about 0.5second off my acceleration.

Though, the Celica is a very fun car too. Though its not RWD, the GT-S model will kind of keep up with my brother's e46 330i w/sport package. The GT-S gets good fuel economy but I dunno if it has folding rear seats, if it does....then that will greatly add stress to my decision. I highly respect Toyota and I highly respect the 2zzge; if its good enough for Lotus, its good enough for me. The GT-S will surely outperform the Bimmer, but driving a Bimmer has the added benefit of more sex. lol. j/k.

What is everybody's take on my thought processes? Has anybody here have any experience with the e36 chassis and the m42 (1.8L) engine? If so, any caveats you would like to share with me? My friends are great admirers of BMW and Toyota, they informed me that the e36 3-series lineup is the most reliable BMW you can get but finding one will result in high mileage. BTW, this looks fun:

 

Larry Roll

I had a BMW 325 when I was stationed in Germany in '83. Mine was a 1980 model year E21, a 316 (1.6 liter) with a Getrag 4-speed. It ran great -- when you could get it started. It didn't want to start whenever the temp was below freezing -- which was generally all Winter in Frankfurt. It was quick enough, I could cruise the Autobahn at 160 KPH all day, but it wasn't capable of the "drifting" or any other nonsense that would appeal to you. I'm sure latter-day BMW's must have improved, but I don't care for them. Whenever my life is being jeopardized by some ignorant young punk trying to go 40 MPH faster than the flow of traffic, he always seems to be in an entry-level Bimmer.

twinky64

I had a BMW 325 when I was stationed in Germany in '83. Mine was a 1980 model year E21, a 316 (1.6 liter) with a Getrag 4-speed. It ran great -- when you could get it started. It didn't want to start whenever the temp was below freezing -- which was generally all Winter in Frankfurt. It was quick enough, I could cruise the Autobahn at 160 KPH all day, but it wasn't capable of the "drifting" or any other nonsense that would appeal to you. I'm sure latter-day BMW's must have improved, but I don't care for them. Whenever my life is being jeopardized by some ignorant young punk trying to go 40 MPH faster than the flow of traffic, he always seems to be in an entry-level Bimmer.

hahahehe. That type of young punk exists here in southern commufornia, but in the form of compact japanese cars like civics, integras, preludes, etc.

 

 

I'm pretty sure most of the North American bound 318ti (the "trunkless" 3 series hatchback) had the 1.9L DOHC engine (M44B19) - the other 318i series (look like a regular sedan) had the 1.8L DOHC (M40B18) engine. Though it might just be the first model year of the 318ti that had the 1.8L before they upgraded to the 1.9L engine (engine came out in 1996 ?). Basically same power, but a hair more torque. Either way - was noted to be a fairly reliable engine. If I recall correctly, the "bulletproof" ones were the SOHC varieties - but the DOHC ones were built up from that particular design - so they share many of the strength/durability traits.

Even though it was an entry level BMW - it shares a similar appetite for "expensive" maintenace items, like its bigger brothers. Some common issues (items to double check when purchasing) with the 318ti and other E36 models are:

- rotten rear shock mounts / chassis attachment points

(NOTE: 318ti used the older generation E30 suspension setup (not multilink), but still had similar issues)

- soft or blown struts (OEM)

- worn rear trailing-arm bushings

- worn front control arm bushings

- worn or damaged transmission mounts

- damaged undercarriage splash panels / rusted body bolts

- bad water pumps (plastic impeller)

- radiator hose issues

- cracked/warped thermostat housing

- sticking gears in the standard shift (usually related to the mounts issues above)

- poor idling on cold starts

- easily bent alloy wheels

- faulty camshaft timing sensor

- faulty ignition system

- brake light circuit failure

- general electrical gremlins

We personally had an older BMW 2002 and Opel Kadett B - both were very similar and ran very reliably - but needed constant maintenance. Not from stuff breaking down - but to keep stuff from breaking down on you unexpectedly, more preventative maintenace. Sort of a hassle - but that was the nature of the beast.

As for the 7th gen Celicas - I'm pretty sure both the GT and GT-S had a 50/50 folding rear seat standard.

twinky64

would anybody here buy a salvaged, restored toyota celica GT-S? I found one that's been hit on front driver's side, but its been restored.

Probably depends on the extent of the original damage and who did the work. Salvage title basically means that you have to run the car int othe ground - as resale value would be dismal. But on the other hand - also means that you could pick it up for cheap. I would look at it more for a parts car than a project/daily driver.

twinky64

Alright, well I finally got my car. For $4400 I got:

1998 BMW z3 1.9L automatic with 115k miles.

Arcticblau-metallic paint

5 spoke 16" rims

Drives like a dream, though because its a soft top, there is a lot of wind noise. Small price to pay though.

Sweet! Post up some pics if you get a chance. Good price as well.

twinky64

Here are some pictures of my replacement vehicle. I opted for a two seater because I am buried with school and work, and time doesn't warrant me the opportunity to have fun. So, instead, I've bought a fun car. All of my brothers and friends have cars, wagons, or suv's. If I need something large moved, I'll just call them. Otherwise, I just carry a couple backpacks normally anyhow.

https://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i106/twi...z3inthedark.jpg

https://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i106/twi...inthegarage.jpg

https://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i106/twi.../z3inthesun.jpg

https://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i106/twi...ndGoldeneye.jpg

Nice! Good choice. LOL! GoldenEye reference.

twinky64

The engine that I have is an m44b19 engine. This is kinda weird, it has a camshaft position sensor. Apparently, as the intake cam spins, it sends a signal to the sensor. The sensor then relays that information to the ecu, which then tells the sparkplugs and injectors what cycle of the 4-cycle process its on. Seems a little rediculous. Does the 1zzfe have that?

Anyhow, I'm gettin a CEL because my camshaft position sensor is having a hiccup every now and then when I shift from Park to Reverse. I clear it. I know its not really a problem....yet.....because my engine starts easily, idles fine, accelerates fine, and cruises fine. So, Ima have to replace the CPS.

I've been studying Toyota's technology for 5 years on the Toyota/Lotus co-designed 1zzfe. I'm trying to expand my knowledge of engineering by studying BMW's basic 4cyl. engine. I've noticed, things are a bit overcomplicated in my naive opinion. There has to be a reason, its BMW for crying out loud. They powered WW2 bombers, the Focke-Wulfs, and the Red-Baron!!!!!! Anyhow, there is an upper intake manifold and a lower intake manifold. Don't ask me why, cuz I haven't the foggiest clue as to why they've engineered it that way. Anyways, I have to take the upper intake manifold off in order to replace the other end of this sensor. Luckily, the "sensor" end is located on the block in front of the timing chain, the "plug" end is located underneath the intake manifold.

I found out that BMW's have been sourcing their auto trannies by GM and their manual trannies by ZF. That explains why BMW's don't last for more than 150,000 miles in an auto. Booooooo! How can BMW let their engineering greatness be compromised by GM! Though, I've heard that the later models, 02+, are all sourced by ZF. That's good news.

Bitter

most if not all OBD2 engines have a cam and crank position sensor to monitor for misfires.