ForumsCorollas2019-21ToyotasTech

hackwriter

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About hackwriter

  1. This will bump this topic up to the top again, but I figure better to do this than start a new topic. This blinking security indicator light thing has just recently started with my 2015 Corolla LE Eco. It has not happened before, it has just started. I went to the dealer and they said it is normal for the reasons cited above. Two techs said this. Is this really normal? If so, why have I not seen it before? It blinks when the car is turned off, whether or not the key is in the car.
  2. When I first got my 2015 LE Plus Eco, I was concerned about mileage. No more; I am now getting 35mpg combined -- right on the money of what's expected. My problem is that merging onto highways is taking my life in my hands. The acceleration is SO SLUGGISH!! I figured out to turn the Eco mode off when merging from entrance ramps, but when I really hit the gas, the tach goes up to 4. Is that normal? It seems like this car takes a lot of effort to get it up to highway speed quickly (a must when driving among crazy NJ drivers). Any tips?
  3. I've had my 2015 Corolla LE Plus Eco with CVT for two weeks. I bought this car because of reliability and the EPA rating was about as good as you get without buying a hybrid. (I'd found the Prius to be really sluggish.) At the dealership they told me to keep it in Eco mode, so I do. Most of my driving is to and from work, on NJ highways at rush hour. What this means is that I am dealing with speeds in the 50-60mph range, punctuated by braking for people cutting me off, weaving, going 40mph on a dry road, stop-and go for volume, in addition to local driving. The mpg indicator is all over the lot, and every time I step on the gas, the mpg indicator goes way down. Merging onto a highway puts the indicator in the 9-10mpg range. My 1973 Pontiac Ventura with a 350 V8 got that kind of mileage! Overall it's telling me I'm getting 29.4mpg for mixed highway and city driving. This is terrible, no better than my old 2003, and it's nowhere near as peppy. Go up a hill, it eats gas. Accelerate to pass someone, watch the mpg indicator plummet. On the rare occasions when I can just keep going and it's relatively flat, it ranges on the highway between showing around 36mpg to about 50, but any acceleration causes it to plummet. 29.4 is far less gas mileage than I would have expected for this car. Any suggestions?
  4. I have a 2003 Corolla CE with about 48,000 miles on it. I had the front brake pads replaced and the rotors resurfaced by the dealer at 34,000 miles in July 2007. Now the brakes are squeaking when stopping at low speeds, and they feel "grabby" -- very sensitive. Last Tuesday (11/25) I slowed down to go around a curve on a wet entrance ramp to a highway, and the brakes seemed to lock up -- and I went skidding off the road. Didn't hit anything, wasn't hurt, but was freaked out. After the day was dry, and going back home from work, I tested the brakes a few times to dry out any residual moisture and they were OK -- but they still squeak braking at low speed. I just had the car to the dealer on 11/22, they checked the brakes and said they were fine. But I am afraid to drive the car on a wet road now. I've decided to have my local mechanic (who is trustworthy) look at them. Has this happened to anyone else? Any idea what it could be that I can have my local guy check? Thanks to all for your help.
  5. I have some of the sulphur problem, and TWO dealers have refused to fix it, saying that it doesn't fix the problem, that the problem is the reformulated gasoline used in my area in the wintertime. Both said the problem should clear up with the new lower-sulphur fuel. The problem DOES lessen in spring, though occasionally I still smell sulphur.
  6. A few weeks ago I posted about the "chirping" sound in my front wheel, which the dealer could not duplicate and is now no longer audible. The dealer said the brakes are OK; only 40% worn down. I had him change the oil while the car was in there. I am at this moment 140 miles from home, no problems with the car, but tonight the check engine light came on as soon as I pulled out of the hotel parking lot to get dinner. It's a 2003 Corolla CE, dealer serviced only, 26,500 miles. I've done some Google searching and I'm somewhat comforted by seeing that usually this is an issue of the emissions system rather than being, oh, say, a blown head gasket or something. By pure blind dumb luck, there is a Toyota dealer about 2 miles from my hotel, and I was able to make an appointment for tomorrow. Is there anything I should say to him to minimize the chances of having to pay for repairs I don't need? I'm female, I'm 4'10" tall, I'm from out of town, so I hit the ripoff trifecta. I've gotten some good info from this board about the MAF sensor and other causes. One useful tip that I guess I should tell the dealer -- I filled up the car in NJ and before I could stop him the guy topped off the tank to the tune of almost a dollar. I usually don't top off.
  7. How difficult is it to change this oneself (if one is not handy in fixing cars)? My dealer too charges $60 and says it's very difficult to replace. But that seems nuts for something that's in essence like an a/c filter!
  8. The front tires look to be pretty bald on the outer surface; definitely less than 1/8" tread. But they're supposed to be warranted for like 60,000 miles. We do keep them properly inflated, so I don't know what the deal is. The chirp is heard while driving, it's a rhythmic chirp that's constant as the car is running; that's why I wonder if it's the tires. The chirping actually stops when you brake. If so, is it worth trying to make a warranty claim on them, or should I just bite the bullet and let my friendly neighborhood mechanic (who does my Civic service) put new tires on? The brakes FEEL fine.
  9. My 2003 Corolla has 26,000 mostly local miles on it. I take it on one 2200-mile trip annually, but other than that, 90% of the mileage is local. My husband and I share the car. He is a "wait till the last second then slam on the brakes" kind of guy, I am a gradual braker. This past weekend we noticed a "chirping" sound in the passenger side front; it sounds like it's coming from the wheel well. The service writer at the dealer says that the brake pads probably need to be changed, and this is an early indicator, so that we can make do with just changing the pads and not the rotors. Some posts I see here indicate it may be tires. We live in NJ, so we have hot summers and cold, wet winters with lots of road salt. Which of these scenarios is more likely? Which should I take care of first? I just had brakes done on a 2001 Honda Civic with 40,000 miles -- could the Corolla need brakes that much sooner? Or should I just change the tires?
  10. Per the dealer? Is that what you meant to say, or per the manufacturer? It sounds like you meant the latter. Please clarify...thanks.
  11. I have a 2003 Corolla CE. Great little car. I've been having it dealer serviced. The car now has 15,000 miles on it, so I'm taking it in for the 15,000 mile service. The dealer already recommends oil changes every 3000 miles for the driving conditions here in the mid-Atlantic (hot summers, lots of road salt in winter). That seems like awfully frequent for a modern car, but OK, at $26.95/pop I can deal with that. But now they're telling me that they recommend a "fuel injector service" EVERY 15,000 MILES!!!!!! Now, I've dealt with shyster service departments before for my Civics, and I've never had anyone tell me I need some $175 fuel injector service on top of a $229 15,000 mile major service -- especially on a car with only 15,000 miles on it. And they recommend some kind of an air filter for the cabin ventilation system. Is this something that Toyotas in general or Corollas specifically need, or is this just the dealer trying to pay for his house on St. Barts? I've had 2 Civics dealer-only serviced, and both conked out at 107,000 miles, which is low for a Honda. Everyone I know who just has their service done at the corner gas station gets like 150,000 miles out of their Hondas and Toyotas. Are the dealers just screwing around with these cars? I'm going to have mine dealer serviced as long as the warranty is in effect, but unless someone can tell me that there is a compelling reason to have all this extra stuff done. $400 in maintenance service on a 2-year-old car seems excessive, when I bought it for its reliability.