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Lethal 7

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About Lethal 7

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  1. As far as I know this has been resolved with the TSB that was mentioned in this thread. I had the same issue with my 2003 Corolla Manual, but mine would drop down from 3,000 RPM. Very annoying, but I lived with it until I was sent the TSB by a forum member (thanks oxymoron!). Printed the sucker out and had the dealer do a reflash and voila!, issue is completely gone this winter. I was cutting it close with my km's as I had 120,000ish kms and the emissions warranty is covered until 130,000. Print out the TSB and get your dealer to fix it.
  2. I bought mine in March 2002 (build date 02/02) and yeah. My post of my experiences of ownership. https://www.corolland.com/forums/index.php?...st&p=148977 I guess there has to be a lemon for every brand....looks like I ended up with one. Lucky me!
  3. I would think this would taken care of when the front rotors get changed out. Can't imagine it needed to be re-torqued before then.
  4. I thought the same too until I saw this thread about rattling issues happening on a 2007 Corolla. 4 years and they still can't build them right. Ouch! https://www.corolland.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=21229 I was dumb and bought one of the very 1st 9th gen corollas. Don't make the same mistake with the new models, wait until at least the 2nd year. And the bonus is when a tech needs to work on the car, it won't be the very 1st time working on the generation of car.
  5. This happened on your 2007? Wow Toyota really dropped the ball on this one and learned absoultey nothing from previous owner's experiences in order to improve the car. I had the EXACT same issue on my 2003 Corolla (built in early 2002). It seemed the tech never took a console apart before in his life because there was extensive damage to my console caused by what looks like a screwdriver that they used to try to pry. So after the 1st fix, I now have a gap between the top of the dash and the top of the radio, extensive marks and to top it all of it still rattled. It took another 3 visits to get the damage repaired and to get it to stop rattling (apparently they wrapped wires and other parts with tape). I still have my gap and the whole assembly tends to "pop" out of position all the time. Looks like crap and the dealer offered to replace the entire dash under warranty but I couldn't even trust them to take apart a console properly, I hate to see what happens when they do a bigger job. So I just live with the gap problem, but at least I am rattle free. I didn't go through arbitration, because they did offer to "fix" the problem by replacing the dash for free. Good luck with which process you decide to go through.
  6. Oops, sorry for the incomplete link. Here it is. http://blogs.motortrend.com/6220282/auto-s...tyle/index.html I also testdrove the 2ZZ-GE XRS and I wasn't a fan. The main reason I didn't like it was because of the ultra-narrow powerband of the engine. Below the 6,600-6,800 RPM 2nd cam switchover point, the engine is pretty gutless. The fact that when you shift at redline from 1-2 and cannot keep the 2nd high HP cam engaged is ridiculous, same with the 2-3 upshift. Flirt with the redline and you get fuelcut if you get anywhere close. Ouch. I thought it was narrow in the 2000 Celica, but at least in that car you can run through the gears on the high-lift cam. In every Honda VTEC powerplant I have driven, you can easily stay on the 2nd cam. The instrument cluster was hit and miss, loved the electroluminescent gauges, but what's up with the tiny tach?, especially when the car makes you flirt with the redline so precisely? Other than that, I did like the upgraded interior and the increased handling, but that powertrain made me shake my head and be glad to be in my CE after the testdrive believe it or not. The XRS has no torque (127 lb-ft....haha), so lack of LSD I can forgive, but yeah every performance car should be equipped with LSD, especially high torque and HP FWD cars like the SRT, Mazdaspeed 3, Spec-V...etc., not to mention performance RWD *cough* BMW 335i, Porsche Boxster *cough*
  7. Looks like the Corolla XRS is going to be lame, just like the last model. This time there is torque but no horsepower instead of horsepower and no torque of the 2ZZ-GE. Toyota can't figure out that high HP and torque is a good thing? Toyota should have made the XRS more high-performance and added a supercharger like the one that was SEMA. http://blogs.motortrend.com/6220282/auto-s...tyle/index.html
  8. Congrats on the perfect quality on your 2004. Wish I could say the same of my 2003. My 2003 had to be taken to the dealer for no less that 10 times for things likes the weatherstripping falling off, trim pieces warping or serpentine belt squealing and my personal favorite, the squeaking clutch assembly (which Toyota refused to fix under the 5 year/100,000 km warranty when my car was within it). Thanks Toyota for not standing by the car you manufacturer and taking 6 months to come to that conclusion. I would have not been impressed if the car was actually not drivable at the time. Ah well, I still love the car and it has the perfect blend of decent performance and above average fuel economy. I just didn't think that it would have so many issues for a Toyota. Yeah I fell for Toyota's marketing and reputation for building a quality product. That will only happen once.
  9. The market responded the way it should have in regards to the Corolla XRS. Ever driven one? I have, and even though the engine sounds great when it's on the aggressive cam, the whole package with the transmission was awful. There was no way to keep the engine in the 2nd cam between the 1-2 shift and even 2-3 shift without abusing the clutch. WTF? Who gave the rubber-stamp approval after the 1st drive of the prototype. I have yet to drive a Honda that has engine falling out of VTEC between shifts. Then you have the tiny tach, it's the same size as my CE tach but with an extra 1,000 RPM range....and it's too small on my car. The rest of it was okay, but it wasn't enough to offset the frustration in driving it. And then the kicker was that it was $10,000 more than I paid for my Corolla. Ouch.
  10. I picked up a set of used 17" Matrix XRS rims for my Corolla. Looks great even with the stock ride height.
  11. I find a few situations where DRLs are useful, one is on a undivided highway. It's deadly easy to tell when a car is coming the other way, even in bright light. If it only saves one head-on collision from occurring resulting in death, I think it's worth it. Second, when there is limited visibility (rain, snow, fog) as most drivers are oblivious to it and don't turn the headlights on like they are supposed to. Other than that, I don't find them to be beneficial. As for your conspiracy theory, you are quite out there. What's next? The radio stations are supported by the oil and insurance companies to increase driver distraction resulting in more accidents and cause wasted fuel economy from powering the headunit, amps and speakers? Come on! I would be more concerned with collusion and price gouging rather than the minuscule increase in gas consumption thanks to DRLs. Here in Canada, pretty much every car beyond 1990 has them, so I'm pretty used to them. Some companies implementation like Saturn's are just awful as it's blinding when someone forgets to turn on the regular headlight at night as they use the highbeams for the DRL function (nice job Saturn). There are studies either way concerning DRLs. I know Americans in general hate DRLs with a passion and I see your post reflects that. Here are some studies on DRLs that reflects both sides. Don't be so quick to dismiss them as useless. http://www.dadrl.org.uk/DRLstudies.html
  12. This reminds me of my dealings with my dealer and Toyota Corporate Canada for something a lot less serious than a blown engine. There is a horrid squeak that emerges from the transaxle that happens when I press the clutch pedal. I was under the powertrain warranty so I took it to the dealer. They identified powertrain components that might be defective (throw-out bearing, clutch fork, etc) and put the case towards Toyota Canada, where it got promptly denied as the parts were not listed under the "powertrain" warranty. After much frustration and haggling, they offered me this great "goodwill" gesture of paying 50% of the repair cost and would not budge. I got as far as I could go in terms of managers and they all just didn't care and getting a returned phone call was a extreme challenge. The only one that did care was the service manager at the dealership, but his hands were tied. I even complained to the dealership owner and got a reply that my situation with Toyota Canada was normal. Ouch. You need more leverage against the Toyota, maybe you can tell your story to a consumer specialist within a news show. They love stories of ordinary people getting screwed by big corporations and it tends to get results as the follow-up story of the big corporate being kind and helping out makes for good PR. It happened here for some Saturn defect I think it was. In any case, good luck with your situation. I just lived with my clutch squeak and I think I turned away at least 3 people that were seriously considering getting a Corolla. I'm less bitter about it now and tend to highlight the positives about my 2003 Corolla rather than the disappointing lack of support from Toyota.
  13. I hear you about the cheap plastic license plate screws. Same thing happened to my car twice, but each time the dealer spent time to remove them.....and then replace them with the exact same screws. It was under warranty so I didn't worry too much. I guess the license plate will be on the car for life until I sell it as I'm sure it will snap in 2 again. Great design. This is what mine looked like. Check out the rust. Ouch. The other thing that is flimsy is the door for the center compartment. One day I got into my car to find the left side hinge got warped making the door stay open.
  14. Thanks for the link. It's exactly what I needed. Best part is that it's under the longer emissions warranty which I'm still under. Nice! Won't know if it made a difference until winter I guess.
  15. Since my OEM pads lasted over 100,000 kms with pad lining to spare, I replaced them with OEM pads. I never had any issues with brake performance or squealing, so I'm one of those "if it ain't broke, why fix it?" Now mind you, my Corolla is my daily driver and I drive it pretty gently.