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daniel0269

Transmission Upgrade 01 Corolla

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Hi, everyone I have a question maybe a silly one. Can a 3 speed transmission be upgraded to a 4 speed without swaping it. In other words transforming it into a 4 speed by switching parts. Will the upgrade help improve Mpgs? I heard that the 3 speed makes the car go high rpms when going up 60 to 65 Mph. Will the change improve performance overall? will it be too risky? or is just impossible?

 

Any input helps :)

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Unfortunately in this particular case, have to swap.

 

In theory, you could keep the same "case" just swap the parts, but the way the parts are installed in a transaxle, it must come apart to exchange those parts. Be faster and less expensive to swap in a 4-speed and associated PCM, wiring.

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If you are talking about the 6-speed manual from the 2ZZ-GE powered cars, then yes - that will physically fit the 1ZZ-FE. You'll have to snag the ECM from the donor car, as the PCM for the automatic transaxle will not have any idea of what is going on.

 

The new automatic 6-speeds, completely different story - will not mate up to the 1ZZ-FE. Even if you got an adapter plate to allow it ot bolt up, you'd have to to get all custom axles + deal with the electronic nightmare of rewiring it, if it is even possible.

 

If you are sticking with the automatic - then the 4-speed A245E transaxle is the only real option for an 8th gen Corolla.

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If I do any changes to the engine not turbo or nitro just lets say the cam shafts with a higher lift will my auto transmission suffer? do I need to have a cooler for the tranny? I was about to buy it and someone told me I would need to put a different exhaust and throtle body with a Cold Air and something to cool the transmission. If I have to, will the exhaust and throtle body from the celica GTS do the trick or I need some aftermarket.

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The amount of power gains from cams shouldn't overwhelm the transaxle. Still a good idea, even if the engine is bone stock, to add some auxillary cooling to any automatic transaxle. Even lowering the temperature a couple of degrees can easily extend the working life of the fluid and transaxle. Rough estimate, if you drop the temperature by 25 degrees, you automatically double the life of the transmission fluid and the transaxle.

 

Different throttlebody, exhaust, CAI to cool transaxle???? Nope, never heard of that - can't see how that will help at all with transaxle temperatures. But in terms of helping get the most out of the cams, then yes - improving induction and exhaust can definitely help - but only if you can tune for it. The stock tune should be conservative enough where you won't lean out, but it has a fairly narrow operating range - so it might not be able to account for the extra flow.

 

Exhaust header from the Celica GTS will not fit, will hit the firewall. The muffler might fit, but might need too much work, as it turns 90 degrees after the rear axle (acts as a diffuser on the rear of the car) - the Corolla is basically straight after the rear axle. Throttlebody, and especially the intake manifold is different - the 2ZZ-GE bolt pattern is close, but not a direct first. There are some that were able to bolt it up (either redrilling holes or just installing with holes that line up. Flanges didn't line up and some had clearance issues with the radiator fans. Throttle body is bigger, but doesn't match the stock 1ZZ-FE intake manifold. Might be loosing power there, as the air stream will be too turbulent.

Better option is to find the OEM composite intake from a 9th gen Corolla 1ZZ-FE. Those match the bolt pattern on the head, no clearance issues, plus considered a pretty cheap part (lots of 9th gen Corolla around). Plus its short runner design is similar to the 2ZZ-GE manifold - naturally favors higher RPM breathing which tends to align with more aggressive camshafts.

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No lol they said I would need it if I put the cams so all parts work together, and after doing that having an intercooler on the transmission will be nessesary, but if it is not nessesary I can probably add that later.

I sent an email to the guys at MWR. I was looking at the 1zzfe crower stage 1 and 2 cams. Stage 1 duration 264/264 and .379/.367" lift. Stage 2 272/272 duration and .396/.396" Lift. They said the gains are about 5-7hp. Now my question is will my car be slower at the start or in the contrary be faster?

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Crower stage 1 cams car not that much different that stock. Designed for low end to mid power, no need to update the valve springs, doesn't mess up your idle. Pushes the peak of the powerband to the right, so now power runs all the way to the rev cutoff instead of dying hundreds of RPM before the cutoff. Nice thing about that, is that you can get away with basically zero tuning, literally drop in and go.

 

The stage 2 cams are a little more aggressive, idle will be messed up and they highly recommend new valve springs (heavier to avoid floating), a their powerband favors the higher RPMs and is push much higher than the stage 1 cams. They make two different sets, one for forced induction - the other is for naturally aspirated engines. Both work best with tuning, the OEM ECM will be confused if you run these cams.

 

You haven't mentioned any tuning or your plans for tuning (any way you look at it, this will likely be the most costly single "part" of your mod). Assuming that you'll try it on the stock ECM at first - the stage 1 cams will be a better choice compared to the stage 2.

 

As for performance, the Stage 1 cams will out run the stock cams, as they are profiled and setup to make power in the same way - off idle to mid-band. Where the cam shines is the upper revs before the car shifts - the stock cam drops on power, while the stage 1 is still climbing.

 

Now with an automatic - you will not be able to take advantage of the high RPM power sell, as it will short shift every time. Even manually shifting, you'll likely hit the limiter before you can cleanly shift (that lag when you move the shifter lever and the transaxle responds) and end up running slower. Still, all other things begin equal - if launched and shifted the same way - the stage 1 cams will out perform the stock cams.

 

If tuning and internal mods comes into the picture - then the higher staged cams will, by design, start to build more power. Idle will be different, sounds rough or lumpy, you'll loose the lower end powerband, but make up a lot more at the top end. Since the engine doesn't have a whole lot of displacement - the powerband will tend to be strongly peaked at the upper revs. What you have to deal with here is your automatic transaxle, as it will now bottle neck the performance gains of these cams (need to modify the stall speed on the torque converter, possible update the line pressures inside the valvebody, change shift strategy, etc.) Fortunately, Monkeywrenchracing does sell the updated transaxle valve bodies on their site.

Edited by fishexpo101

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They'll call them performance valve bodies. http://www.monkeywrenchracing.com/product_info.php?cPath=25_136&products_id=1983

 

Run something like $600-$700 for a valve body + core charges. Basically its that block of metal with oil passages, solenoids, springs, and check balls that control the flow of fluid to the appropriate clutch packs inside the transaxle to allow gear changes. You'll probably have to contact them, as the link only points to the U341E transaxle. If you have a 4-speed 8th gen automatic - you'll need one for a A245E transaxle.

 

Sounds steep, but probably the best bang for the money on an automatic transmission - if you need to get more control over shifting. Otherwise, you'd have to turn your entire transaxle to LevelTen or similar shop for a couple of months, while they rebuild all the guts inside for a couple of thousand.

 

They also carry higher stall speed torque converters as well. http://www.monkeywrenchracing.com/product_info.php?cPath=25_111&products_id=1036

 

Usual recipe to beef up an automatic: higher stall torque converter + revised valvebody + auxillary fluid cooler with good fluid. That will get you about 80-85% of the max capabilities of the transaxle. Clutch packs/friction bands - don't need those unless the existing ones are beat up and worn, or you plan on running crazy amounts of power.

Edited by fishexpo101

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will it be the same case for crankshafts? I will have to modify the Transmission in order to feel gains in throttle response. If that is the case will it be more cost efficient or similar price to upgrade to the 6 speed manual from a celica rather than upgrade an automatic transmission?

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Crankshaft on the 1ZZ-FE is pretty decent - the guys running stroker kits on their forced induction 2ZZ-GE actually use the crank from the 1ZZ-FE. Ours are already stress-relieved (shot peened) at the factory.

 

As for transaxles - any manual one that will mate up to the 1ZZ-FE will make it feel "more lively". If anything, it will be the almost automatic 75-100lbs weight savings to jump between the automatic vs the standard shift transaxle.

 

The 6-speed should be a good match up for the 1ZZ-FE. The powerband is a little on the low side to take advantage of the shorter gear spacing, but many have reported that was a non-issue. This sort of swap will be WAY cheaper/easier than trying to get a 6-speed auto from a different Toyota platform to fit the 1ZZ-FE.

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^^^ That's one way to do it!

 

Keep one as a daily driver, the other as your project / fun car.

 

For some, that can be the same car - but once you start blowing up parts - trying to get replacement parts/get to work on time without having a spare vehicle on hand gets old, really fast.

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yeah, I was looking at the TC as an option too. It has more torque than the Celica. I'm also afraid that I might get a Celica with oil consumption problems just like my corolla. I haven't heard much of the same problem with the 2zzge, but makes me wonder if Ill be unlucky again loll. What do you think TC over Celica? Which engine if more reliable and powerful, and the car overall suspension, handling, etc.

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