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Bull6791

Coolant Flush

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I am on my second water pump. Took car to dealer for 30k service and the called. Saying water pump and a real small weeper. You could hardly notice it coming out of an o ring. The replaced it under warranty.

I thought red and pink could not be mixed.

Did you ever use ZEREX ASIAN fluid.

I would be great if that bottle comes out. Did you ever take yours out.

Edited by Bull6791

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trap

Ideally, Red and Pink coolant "shouldn't" be mixed, but many have done so during the transition phase where Red was being replaced with Pink for newer Toyotas.

 

ZEREX coolant is another equivalent coolant - same league as the Turbo Power stuff. Never used it, so I can't give a review on it.

 

As for the reservoir - I take the one out of the Corolla every time. Only two bolts hold it on - pops right off. Though mine is an 8th gen model, your 9th gen might be different.

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Does water pump have a o ring or seal that can leak. As indicated by my last post that is what was leaking on my first water pump. It was hardly noticeable the dealer said.

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Yup, there is an o-ring between the pump and the block. Pretty rare for it to leak there, it could leak from the shaft seal - but again, pretty rare. With this mileage and on your second pump - I chalk that up to a defective part sneaking its way past QC.

 

Dealership mechanic knows that these can weep some fluid (crusty deposits) - but that doesn't mean it is bad, right? Since it was replaced under warranty - I wouldn't worry about it. Could have been part of the water pump recall on some Corolla / Camry models. I think they recalled a couple of million cars, but don't remember any details beyond that.

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For the Blackstone Labs pump - use those sample containers. Ask for me kits and they'll send them to you for free, Could probably buy those from a plastic container reseller, like US Plastics or similar, but you'll need the specs on the containers. Other pumps would use their own containers.

 

I guess you could cobble something else to work, find something that matches the threads, extend any lengths of hose, etc. I know I could do it with my Mityvac, but for something like this (1/2 gallon or so of fluid - I wouldn't want to, way too much fluid to move around. Be faster to use a fluid transfer pump.

 

You can find those pretty much any place that sells automotive supplies, online would likely be less expensive. Make them for moving fluids from one container to another - designed to move a fair amount of fluid is a short period of time. Like siphoning gasoline out of the gas tank into a gas can, transferring oil from a drum to easier to handle containers, etc.

 

Or you can just remove the reservoir and dump it out - that would be on the top of my list if it was my car and I could get at the reservoir easily.

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Electric and manual versions are out there. I was referring more to a manual pump, electric ones would be overkill for this application. Siphon pump might work as well - depends on what you used that pump for previously and how easy/hard it is to clean out.

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Under my alternator I see something I want to know if it is the water pump. On the left side of it it has a pulley and I see 3 open holes on it. Nothing in their. In the hole I see just threads.

I am only asking.

Now what is difference between manual transfer pump and vacuum pump that I got from black stone.

One uses vacuum and transfer pump does not. Because the vacuum pump uses a vacuum that makes it pump slower.

Edited by Bull6791

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Just look up a manual fluid transfer pump online and see what they look like, once you see them, you'll understand what I'm talking about - basically comparing your sample pump to something like a bike air pump. Lots of them online, some are very inexpensive - I have one I picked up at Advance Auto generic pump for around $9, Works plenty fine for what I want to use it for. Name brands, like Mityvac are a couple bucks more - usually come with more fittings.

 

As far as design, both use positive displacement to draw in air or fluid. So in a sense, they both use vacuum to move fluid. The difference is the scale of fluid you can move, and how quickly. Most manual transfer pumps use a piston to draw in and expel fluid, the amount of fluid moved in one cycle is dependent on the length of the transfer pump body. A typical vacuum sampling pump might only move a couple of ounces at most - a transfer pump can move 10s of ounces at a time. With piston transfer pump, you could move 8-10 ounces every other stroke (one to draw in, one to push out) - no container to exchange, just two tubes to deal with. Sample pumps move enough to fill their sampling jars, many need that jar in place to generate enough vacuum to draw in fluid. You have to remove the jar, drain out, and replace to continue siphoning fluids.

 

I'm sort of trying to draw you away from using your oil sampling pump, as I don't want to contaminate your UOA samples down the road. Even if you clean it, some traces of coolant will be stuck in there, could spike a UOA. But its your pump, you can decide how you want to use it.

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Water pump is under alternator does it have a pulley on side of it.

Also where is heater core. How do you know or tell if it is leaking.

Sorry for all the question

Thanks frank

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Water pump is of course driven by its pulley. Heater core is behind firewall, close to blower motor. If it leaks, coolant will come out of it.

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Yup - has a pulley on it, as noted by dom. Heater core is inside the dash - just trace back the heater hoses (little thinner than the radiator hoses, comes off the block or head, don't remember) - hoses runs into the firewall (back part of the engine bay).

 

Only way to know if the heater core is leaking is if you notice the carpet on the passenger wheel well is wet with coolant, notice a sweet odor in the car, and/or the windshield fogs up immediately.

 

We don't mind the questions - but given that type of information you are asking for, be worthwhile to get a Haynes Repair Manual for the car, if you haven't already done so. More than 90% of the questions you asked here will be answered in there. These sort of manuals are good for any owner, even if they are not interested in DIY maintenance, just to know where components are located on the car, what components are on the car. If anything, to protect you from potentially unscrupulous mechanics.

 

Came in real handy with my wife, when see took in my car when I was away on travel. They wanted to replace the fuel pump, said they said they could see it leaking - she wanted the tech to show her exactly where, he opened the hood and pointed to something on the firewall. She knew right away that it was bogus, because she knows the pump is inside the gas tank. Saved herself from a potentially harmful $800 bill.

Edited by fishexpo101

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