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autotech2612

Tackling Small Rust Areas

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Winter is upon us. I have two small areas of rust that I'd like to eliminate before the snow flies. The car is white. Has anyone done simple rust repair successfully? If so, is it a tedious process? Cost involved?

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Two ways to tackle this - eliminate all traces of corrosion then metal prep, prime, paint, seal. Another way is to use a rust inhibitor or reactant - some products chemically react with rust and form a tough oxide. Those cases, the more "clean" rust you have - better they work. POR-15 is the stuff I use - no problems yet.

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So, with a small rust area, (size of a quarter), spraying the rust inhibitor will only form a tough oxide, but will not get rid of the rust? I have another small area in the RR wheel well and a rear jack point. I just feel uncomfortable with what you told me (metal prep, prime, paint, seal). I don't know the cost of materials and I am afraid of performing a poor job that I will regret.

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If you dig enough of the loose rust out of there and hit it with a rust inhibitor - should hold up until you get a chance to really work on it. If you don't have time for a rust inhibitor - hit it with grease, to keep moisture away. Even with a pretty sizeable amount of corrosion - if you can keep water and moisture away - corrosion will slow down considerably.

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Where do I buy that rust inhibitor? Do I have to go to a specialty shop/store? What brand do you recommend? And, how do I dig the loose rust out? Do I use sandpaper or something similar to that?

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POR15 you can get online. There are some commercial ones you might find in a store - one that I've used in the past was called One Step Rust Killer - usually sold in gallons to drums. Used that a lot in the warehouse to protect the shelving units we had.

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One last concern: the small area (size of a quarter) on the LR door (center of door at the bottom) can be sanded down, but I still don't know what to use to get rid of the rust there, as far as a material. I'm also concerned about sanding down the rust in that area because I don't want to harm the rust-free areas. Note this car is white.

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The POR-15 and other rust converting stuff binds with the existing rust, allowing you to paint over it with a matching topcoat.

 

Without that - you have to remove as much rust as possible before you metal prep and then prime. It is not uncommon to sand down clean metal in order to get to the rust - in terms of body work, that is actually the norm. Can't fully get at the rust without eating clean metal. Otherwise - the rust will just come back.

 

That's where products like POR-15 and similar come in - they bind with rust, converting it to a non-reactive surface ready for primer/paint. You may still need to sand aggressively the area around to get the rusted spot below the level of the good metal. That way, you can use the rust converter, prep the exposed clean metal, fill the area (putty or build up primer). then paint to match the rest of the car.

 

On the door - you probably can't avoid touching the rust free parts - you could try using a flap wheel or wire brush cup to just selectively attack the rust, but you have to extend the sanding to the rest of the area to prep it for new paint. Otherwise, the spot repair will be visible. Even with white, you still have to blend the repair into the rest of the door. The only good thing, is that solid colors are easier to blend into existing paint.

 

Different approach to tackling this job compared to fresh paint chips - as the rust has likely spread under the paint slightly. Have to eat into the good paint to expose the rust to the rust converter - or just grind off the rust completely - prep, prime, paint.

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Looks like I'll be purchasing the POR-15. Thank you for your help and suggestions. I have to do this within two weeks before we get a first snowfall. I will include some photos later of the areas.

 

Also, I did pull each fuel injector (recall my high idle issue) to see if any injector removed would behave differently from the others. I disconnected one, then re-connected it (then moved to the others). They are behaved about the same (no big dip in idle quality). So, I can rule out injectors as cause?

 

Also, took out some more power steering ATF and replenished.

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Sounds like you can rule out a dead injector - but intermittent or dirty injector could still be a possibility. I'm leaning more toward a vacuum leak.

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And that's going to be a pain to solve. I really don't want to replace the intake manifold gasket. Maybe I'm not looking hard enough between air filter and intake. . .

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And on ebay, all I'm seeing for POR-15 are listings with these titles over and over. It says "black", and I am unfamiliar with this product. It's also not cheap.

 

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Here are some photos of the rust spots (before I start a new topic on rear shocks/struts): So, spaying POR-15 directly on these areas should be good to go?

 

 

 

 

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Bottom of the door - that isn't bad at all - little surface rust that is pushing out the paint. You should be able to sand off all the rust and repaint it, shouldn't need anything special to fix that.

 

As for the fender, wheel well areas - that is a perfect case for a rust converter like POR-15. IF you wanted to clean that up without a converter - you'll have to grind out a fair portion of it - lots of work, If you can't treat it with a rust converter, try and grind out as much rust as possible and hit it with something to seal it from further moisture/water - undercoating, etc.

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Where do I get the white paint? Certain type you recommend? Cost?

 

Also, I can't use sandpaper to sand that off, can I? Is there a different grade I need to use? I have never sanded rust before.

Edited by autotech2612

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