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Transmission Oil For '99 5 Speed

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Some gas stations might also be running "winterized" fuel as well. I know in my area - they start around September. I usually see MPG nose dive anywhere from 10%-20% during this time. Extra idling to warm up the car doesn't help either - but since my commute is almost exclusively highway driving - extra minute of idling before my commute will be less of an impact for me than to some that are exclusively city driving.

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Just did the change exactly how you two stated it should be done, and I did not remove the bottom radiator hose. I did remove the top one to replace the PCV hose as I stated I would. I did remove the rear drain petcock (not as hard to get a socket in there as I thought it would be). Re-attached upper radiator hose except to where it connects into the radiator. Sprayed city water into top hose and it was running out from the petcock. Did this quite a bit. Screwed petcock back on. Put upper radiator hose back to the radiator. A gallon of coolant came out when I removed the radiator petcock. Doesn't look too bad, pink with some sediment. After radiator drained, I filled system with distilled water.

 

After filling with distilled, I left radiator cap off and started the car. I put the heater on high and let the car idle for up to ten minutes. Temperature needle was in the normal zone, but no hot air came out, just lukewarm. I figured there was air in the system.

 

Drained and refilled a second time. Started the car, heat on high. Revved the engine a few times. Radiator cap off, I squeezed the upper hose a few times in a creative effort to "burp" the system.\

 

Lukewarm air flowed through the vents.

 

Drained. Used jack to raise right front of the car, and the back. A little more water came out, but not much.

 

Filled with 60/40 mixture of Red and distilled water. Also put the same mixture into the recovery tank. Started car, heat on high, but lukewarm again.

 

What's wrong?

 

 

I have to leave in a few and drive five miles on the highway, so I'll see if remaining air will bleed itself out of the system. . .

Edited by autotech2612

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Drove car and heat is superb. Remaining air bled itself out. So, ready for winter -- with the exception of the still-to-be discovered high-idle issue and I need to sand those two rust areas.

 

Here are some photos for the heck of it:

 

 

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005_zps9d64a59e.jpg

Edited by autotech2612

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Some gas stations might also be running "winterized" fuel as well. I know in my area - they start around September. I usually see MPG nose dive anywhere from 10%-20% during this time. Extra idling to warm up the car doesn't help either - but since my commute is almost exclusively highway driving - extra minute of idling before my commute will be less of an impact for me than to some that are exclusively city driving.

Fish,

 

My commutes are almost exclusively highway as well (even when not going to work, I use highway as much as possible). I have been driving 58 mph lately in order to somewhat compensate for the temperatures. With my high idle problem, I'm wasting fuel. Last night I started my car and it was 47 ambient, and car idled 1,800 RPM, slowed to 1,250 RPM driving a block to the traffic light. Waited about two minutes for light to change (car in neutral, no brake), and upon driving again, reduced to 1,150-ish RPM. From this stop light, it's 1/4 mile at 35mph before I enter the highway.

 

I don't know what you mean when you state some gas stations might also be running "winterized fuel".

Edited by autotech2612

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The fed has mandated that states run reformulated fuel that is allowed a higher RVP specification, ie. easier to evaporate at lower temperatures. This increases the volatility of gasoline at lower temperatures. These "winter" fuel additives help the car light off easier, but also have less energy per unit volume - they add oxygenates and swap in cheaper butane into the mix. Basically you get less "gasoline" per gallon - which hurts overall fuel economy. How much this hurts MPG, depends on ambient temps and quality of gas. If you kept the ambient air constant and just changed the types of gasoline - it is a small effect - around the 2%-3% range. Increased volatility "should" help out an engine at lower temperatures - but it really depends on the engine. I mentioned that only some are doing it as there are some who people don't want the winterized gas or even gas mixed with ethanol (E10) - so in that case, certain stations carry 100% gasoline. I've gone to some that still sell kerosene and leaded gas as well.

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I've heard from one person that using E10 in a non-flexfuel vehicle is "not worth it", and actually delivers worse fuel economy than non-E10.

 

Also, in your 2002, are you just fueling with 87 octane?

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E10 gas vs regular - pretty much any car will run it, no issues. Unless the fuel station specifically advertises it - most stations sell gasoline that is E10.

 

Flex-fuel specific cars - those were specially designed to run E85 fuel (85% ethanol/15% gas) - regular car's fuel system would corrode if you use that much alcohol. They also have different timing and fuel maps to take advantage of the slightly higher octane rating of the fuel. Performance wise - they actually run about the same. But fuel economy can be vastly different - 25-35% worse MPG can be realized, trading that for a more environmentally friendly fuel, assuming you don't account for all the processing and logistics on ethanol production - factor that in, the two are pretty close - then it boils down to an emissions issue.

 

As for octane that I run - depends on the station. Most of the time, I just pour in the cheapest fuel I can find. But there are occasions, where I get excessive pinging under load or the car feels a bit off - I can run higher octane fuels as see better MPG numbers. In the past - I was able to maximize my fuel cost to distance covered running premium gasoline. Then, the price difference was only 10-20 cents per gallon different between regular and premium. Now - even if I get better MPG with premium - it would be pretty much a wash in terms of cost savings.

 

Not sure on others here - but I saw a marked different in MPG with the different grades of gasoline. Just moving from regular (87 octane) to premium (91 octane) - netted me about 10%-15% gain in MPG. Back when fuel prices were less than $3 a gallon, I was realizing anywhere from $90-$120 a year in gas cost savings by running premium. With current fuel prices - now I'm realizing about $10-$20 a year in savings. Pretty much not worth my time - so even if I save in the long run - I still feel the burn from that extra $5 or so per tank fill up burden if I fill with premium.

I know that some people have argued that premium fuel doesn't "burn" as well as regular - you get excessive carbon coking and deposits if you run the higher octane. Though might have been true back in the day - modern engines (that are working properly) won't care. They go by their knock sensor to adjust ignition timing and higher engine temps and compression can benefit from a gas that resists detonation/auto-ignition. Once you light off the spark - it will burn just as well as regular gas..

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I had no idea, nor have I heard about fuel that is winterized. What are the prices (in general) of 87 in your area?

 

Also, have you used Chevron Techron? I started using it in my previous car, twice a year. I've heard nothing but good reviews, but only to use it on a non-regular basis because it's "very potent".

 

Need to get this clutch replaced; can't believe it's still the original. The worn disc is likely contributing to the cause of the "jamming" into third and fifth gears.

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Usually, when they roll out the winter gas, prices drop just a bit. 87 octane regular by my house (Shell) is $3.43 a gallon right now.

Yes, Chevron Techron Fuel System Cleaner version (says concentrated plus or something along those lines) - use whenever I run out of Redline stuff. Chevron can be found pretty much everywhere - lately, they've been running a decent sale on them at Advance and Autozone ($8 for two).

 

The IAC valve is on the throttle body itself. Like a rectangular box that hangs off the bottom of the throttlebody. Will have some odd looking screws holding it on.

 

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You can remove throttle body from intake manifold without damaging the TB gasket. It doesn't usually need to be replaced.

 

IAC valve screws on TB can be removed with a Tamper proof Torx T20 tool (5-point star as opposed to 6-point regular Torx):

 

http://www.fastenal.com/web/products/details/0257836;jsessionid=8v3ZSkKZM33rzxprrpGGyCcKG6xp6GLGvbZHf8GyJ7ZjZPlwpTXh!-888801569!1368581969

 

http://www.amazon.ca/Silverhill-Tools-ATK67-Point-Security/dp/B00BFINNJQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1382320622&sr=1-1&keywords=tamper+proof+torx+20

 

DIY 2003-2004 Corolla, Matrix, Vibe TB, IACV, and Intake Clean/Replace Gaskets:

 

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/132-9th-generation-2003-2008/530729-diy-2003-2004-corolla-matrix-vibe-tb-iacv-intake-clean-replace-gaskets.html

 

I've never had to fool with my IACV which is still flawless at 163,000 miles... I sprayed it with WD-40 and blew it out with compredded air once without any dismantling, just for the hell of it.

Edited by dom

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The clutch in mine is being replaced early next week. I have specifically told the mechanic to replace current gear oil with Redline MT-90. I have a SACHS clutch kit ready to go for the mechanic. Quote is $600.

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Not bad price wise - lots of labor involved in changing out the clutch on a transverse engine layout like most FWD vehicles. SACHS are decent quality too - shouldn't have any issues.

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