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pocketz06

Clean Throttle Body, Sensor, And Change Pcv Valve

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just like the topic title says i want to clean the TB, MAF Sensor, and change the PCV valve

but i cant find any how-to's on the 2000 toyota corolla. So if i can get directions or even pictures

that would be great. Also, what PCV valve would you recommend? Thanks guys

 

 

PS.

on the road to find out why my car shakes(vibrates) on idle. =)

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Here is one I posted some time ago - https://www.corolland.com/forums/index.php?/topic/22499-diy-info-some-uncommon-maintenance-items/page__view__findpost__p__159456

 

As for the AMF and PCV valve - you can try cleaning them first, assuming that they aren't completely clogged with gunk and blowby(PCV). Otherwise, I'd highly recommend buying the OEM PCV from the dealership. Costs a couple dollars more, but the part will fit perfectly. MAF sensor - OEM or aftermarket - people seem to have good luck with both of them.

 

MAF and IAT sensor, throttlebody cleaning, check plug gap / sparkplug condition, add a good injector cleaner to the tank (Redline S1 or similar) - all good ideas to help you diagnose a shaking/vibrations at idle/off-idle.

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Here is one I posted some time ago - http://www.corolland...post__p__159456

 

As for the AMF and PCV valve - you can try cleaning them first, assuming that they aren't completely clogged with gunk and blowby(PCV). Otherwise, I'd highly recommend buying the OEM PCV from the dealership. Costs a couple dollars more, but the part will fit perfectly. MAF sensor - OEM or aftermarket - people seem to have good luck with both of them.

 

MAF and IAT sensor, throttlebody cleaning, check plug gap / sparkplug condition, add a good injector cleaner to the tank (Redline S1 or similar) - all good ideas to help you diagnose a shaking/vibrations at idle/off-idle.

 

i cleaned the throttle body and the shaking still persist. Now im going to clean the maf sensor and pcv valve, if none work im gonna do a tune up, and see if the car still shakes on idle. Thanks a lot man I appreciate your help.

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Here is one I posted some time ago - http://www.corolland...post__p__159456

 

As for the AMF and PCV valve - you can try cleaning them first, assuming that they aren't completely clogged with gunk and blowby(PCV). Otherwise, I'd highly recommend buying the OEM PCV from the dealership. Costs a couple dollars more, but the part will fit perfectly. MAF sensor - OEM or aftermarket - people seem to have good luck with both of them.

 

MAF and IAT sensor, throttlebody cleaning, check plug gap / sparkplug condition, add a good injector cleaner to the tank (Redline S1 or similar) - all good ideas to help you diagnose a shaking/vibrations at idle/off-idle.

 

i cleaned the throttle body and the shaking still persist. Now im going to clean the maf sensor and pcv valve, if none work im gonna do a tune up, and see if the car still shakes on idle. Thanks a lot man I appreciate your help.

 

i cleaned the maf sensor, and pcv valve. and i added a injector cleaner to the tank and the shaking(vibrating) on idle is still happening, so next is the spark plugs i guess, what else can it be??

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After the sparkplugs and visual inspection of the coil packs - the only things left are:

 

- to verify timing (can't really change it, but you can atleast check it)

- clean upper intake

- faulty or dying O2 sensor (misreading air/fuel mix)

- faulty or dying MAF sensor (misreading air/fuel mix)

- check fuel pump/fuel regulator (check pressures, fuel filter is designed to last the lift of the car - but that can be checked as well)

- check injectors (bench flow test, to see if one or more are flowing too little, too much)

- check for bad motor mounts (try jacking a corner of the car up in the air as you idle the engine, if the vibration changes, may have a bad motor mount)

- check for electrical ground loops (use a DMM set on millivolt scale and see if you can measure any voltage from gronud point to groun point, if the voltage is not 0V - may have a loop)

- possible bad TPS sensor on the throttle body

- clogged IAC on the throttlebody (our IAC valves are prone to carboning over, some of them need to completely removed from the throttlebody to be cleaned, a non-trivial task - as those screws are tough to remove)

- possible vacuum leak or leaks (sources to check, all t-fittings, around the throttlebody, hose running to the IAC valve, PCV valve, etc)

 

My suggestion is to check out the simple stuff first - the ones that don't require swapping any parts, you can rule out quite a bit with a visual inspection, so try double-checking a component that you ruled out earlier - different conditions can make some problems more visible.

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I am in the same boat. 2002 Corolla Purchase at 65k 3/1/2009 check engine lite on. Misfire previouse owner changed plugs ok for 12+ months.

Now get misfire CEL and P0301 P0302. Changed plugs again, 2nd set of Bosch Platinum, Ran same set for 12 months no problems, now second set gets CEL after couple weeks. Engine bucks and shutddersat stop lites. Have 85K on car now

 

Change plugs to NGK's, change PVC, new air filter, used STP EFI cleaner, cleaned MAF with MAF cleaner, swapped all 4 coil packs with another set, tested each coil pack.--no change. Also engine lifters/valves rattle at start and just before shifting to next gear, no power off the line but once I hit 1200+ RPM all seems ok. Power power and peppy at 25 MPH, still get 30+ MPG.

 

Can you give me detailed steps to test the O2 sensor?

 

Thanks

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Need an O-scope or some other high impedance voltmeter. Also need a set of probes that will fit inside the connector, need to back probe the connector to see exactly what the O2 sensor is putting out, voltage wise as the engine is running. Don't put an ohmmeter across the O2 sensors - they don't particularly take well to that, some cases you'll permanently damage the sensor.

 

In your case - I would suspect a VVTi issue. Most likely a clogged OCV and/or OCV filter. The oil control valve has been talked about before on this forum - for the models with VVTi, be on my short list of things to check out for drivability issues.

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Thanks for your quick reply. One of the o2 sensors is in a hard place to put probes to while hot!!

 

The OCV is something I saw in one of your posts. But I do not recognize where it is on the engine from your pictures.

 

Can you tell me where it is and then I will try that next.

 

Greg

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OCV (oil control valve) is located on the front of the engine, on the cylinder head - just to the left of the alternator. The OCV filter is directly below the OCV. Just look for an electrical connection to plugs into a small cylinder that is to the left of the alternator (serpentine belt side).

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OK I found it but can not get a wrench on it, and a socket looks harder. Looks like removal of the alternator would make it easier.

 

Pain removing the belt and such just to get to this bolt. Wrench already slipped off so do not want to mess it up more.

 

Will do this weekend.

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Yeah, it is pretty tight in there. I was able to "just" get it out without pulling the alternator out, but it make it much easier to just remove the alternator. If you have to replace the serpentine belt anyways, this would be the perfect time to do so.

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OK tried is all. New PVC valve, Cleaned OCV, cleaned MAF, new air filter and tested each coil, in fact swapped them with old Corolla that I sold. Engine threw a rod and buyer replaced engine.

 

Just cleaned O2 sensor with MAF spray (1st one on the header), also reset engine code. Bad news is one nut on O2 sensor was stuck on and I ended up twisting off the bolt with the nut. O2 Sensor back on with one nut. First crank and idle is much better will test drive later today.

Will worry about missing bolt later. Guessing pulling the header, replacing bolt.

 

BTW will replace belt, did not look bad but did not look good enough, had some cracks.

 

More later.

 

 

 

 

 

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OK tried is all. New PVC valve, Cleaned OCV, cleaned MAF, new air filter and tested each coil, in fact swapped them with old Corolla that I sold. Engine threw a rod and buyer replaced engine.

 

Just cleaned O2 sensor with MAF spray (1st one on the header), also reset engine code. Bad news is one nut on O2 sensor was stuck on and I ended up twisting off the bolt with the nut. O2 Sensor back on with one nut. First crank and idle is much better will test drive later today.

Will worry about missing bolt later. Guessing pulling the header, replacing bolt.

 

BTW will replace belt, did not look bad but did not look good enough, had some cracks.

 

More later.

 

 

You can put a very short bolt and lock washer in the hole where the nut and stud were. That will prevent any exhaust leaks around the O2 sensor flange, and it saves you from having to pull the exhaust manifold.

Edited by dshadle1

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What is left of the bolt does not clear the flange. Will try it like this and add it to my future repairs. If this fixes my low idle issues then I will move this to the top of my repair list.

 

Have a Mazda MPV that I need to replace the rear end and the radiator. I want this Corolla working for my sons to drive. Really like the 30+ MPG compared to 18 MPG. Looking for a replacement to match the space of the MPV and mpg of the Corolla will be tough, the mpg will be the priority. With a 60 mile round trip commute I like the Corolla's mpg.

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What is left of the bolt does not clear the flange. Will try it like this and add it to my future repairs. If this fixes my low idle issues then I will move this to the top of my repair list.

 

Have a Mazda MPV that I need to replace the rear end and the radiator. I want this Corolla working for my sons to drive. Really like the 30+ MPG compared to 18 MPG. Looking for a replacement to match the space of the MPV and mpg of the Corolla will be tough, the mpg will be the priority. With a 60 mile round trip commute I like the Corolla's mpg.

 

Oh, I see. I thought you meant that you screwed the stud out fully intact. Just keep an eye out for CEL indicating exhaust leak.

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