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the99contour

Those Who Can't Respect Other's Property

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trap
Well, you're estimate will pay for the rental car I'll have while mine is in the shop. What you can't see in the pictures is that there is stretched metal near the center of the dent and cracked paint near the tail light, which makes the damage more extensive than the photos show, and thus more expensive to repair.

 

The dent will be popped out, the stretched part filled and the entire body panel repainted. I will also have a rental car for several days because of scheduling conflicts between myself, the body shop and the rental agency. This has already been worked out, I have the estimates and both the adjuster and body shop agree that the panel will be filled and painted, this was already turned into a work order and a check has been cut, the rental car is paid for and this is a done deal.

 

I have a closed end lease, so no matter what happens to the car, short of it getting totaled, I owe Toyota nothing when I turn it back in as long as there aren't any damages that are beyond normal wear and tear. Personally, I don't really care if Toyota Motor Credit takes a hit when they resell the car, but I can tell you that they won't. Since this was not an accident, it isn't going on Carfax and I'm not required to disclose this damage to Toyota, nor are they required to disclose it to anyone else, so exactly how is anyone to know and give them less for the car because of it?

 

Any reasonably well-trained and experienced appraiser will, upon your lease turn-in, see the repair work done. It won't matter whether or not it was caused by an accident. Just because you have a closed-end lease doesn't mean you can't be dinged for damages. Your best hope is that the repair is a particularly good one, but few of them are good enough that they cannot be spotted by someone who knows what to look for. And remember, just because it wasn't an "accident," there was still an insurance claim, and that can be discovered if the dealer is savvy enough, and most are.

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Well, you're estimate will pay for the rental car I'll have while mine is in the shop. What you can't see in the pictures is that there is stretched metal near the center of the dent and cracked paint near the tail light, which makes the damage more extensive than the photos show, and thus more expensive to repair.

 

The dent will be popped out, the stretched part filled and the entire body panel repainted. I will also have a rental car for several days because of scheduling conflicts between myself, the body shop and the rental agency. This has already been worked out, I have the estimates and both the adjuster and body shop agree that the panel will be filled and painted, this was already turned into a work order and a check has been cut, the rental car is paid for and this is a done deal.

 

I have a closed end lease, so no matter what happens to the car, short of it getting totaled, I owe Toyota nothing when I turn it back in as long as there aren't any damages that are beyond normal wear and tear. Personally, I don't really care if Toyota Motor Credit takes a hit when they resell the car, but I can tell you that they won't. Since this was not an accident, it isn't going on Carfax and I'm not required to disclose this damage to Toyota, nor are they required to disclose it to anyone else, so exactly how is anyone to know and give them less for the car because of it?

 

Any reasonably well-trained and experienced appraiser will, upon your lease turn-in, see the repair work done. It won't matter whether or not it was caused by an accident. Just because you have a closed-end lease doesn't mean you can't be dinged for damages. Your best hope is that the repair is a particularly good one, but few of them are good enough that they cannot be spotted by someone who knows what to look for. And remember, just because it wasn't an "accident," there was still an insurance claim, and that can be discovered if the dealer is savvy enough, and most are.

 

This body shop is certified to repair Mercedes Benz, BMW and Jaguar cars, so I think that they are good enough to preform what is far from a major repair to a Toyota.

 

Last summer they repainted my bumper on a warranty claim, and it was my dealer who took the car there, it was not my request. When the car came back, the paint matched so well that the only way I could tell the paint was redone was that the paint was no longer flaking off the bumper and I'm one picky car person.

 

On a side note, I will tell Toyota that this damage occurred to the car prior to lease turn in because I am honest, but I can tell you already that they won't bat an eye. They'll do the same thing that they did when I turned the Corolla in, they'll go look inside it, walk around the outside of it and sign off saying it is in acceptable condition. The Corolla had half the front end replaced and several mechanical components replaced as well, which they knew about and they didn't give the car any extra scrutiny, nor do they charge me anything.

 

Ever know anyone who got charged for damages on a lease return for a Toyota? I don't and I've seen some cars returned in pretty crappy condition.

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Hmmm. Well, I'll have to admit that I worked at what was primarily a Ford dealership, which also handled Hyundai and Mitsubishi. I'd done numerous lease turn-ins, but only Fords, and we were not at all shy about charging the lessees for any damages, or depreciating the leased vehicle for accident repairs. If it's different for Toyotas, then I was working at the wrong dealership. However, Toyota's always command the highest prices (and profits) on the used car market, so getting good-looking, one-owner pre-owned Toyotas would always be a priority. They're the only kind of used car I'd ever buy!

 

Kinda makes me wonder. My '03 Corolla is over 6 years old and still hasn't got 60K miles on it yet, though it will soon. Still, it's 30K miles lower than where it should be, on average. Maybe I should sell it and get an '09 or a '10. Problem is, there is just no need. The car is essentially perfect -- but I'd like to have one that was back under warranty.

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Hmmm. Well, I'll have to admit that I worked at what was primarily a Ford dealership, which also handled Hyundai and Mitsubishi. I'd done numerous lease turn-ins, but only Fords, and we were not at all shy about charging the lessees for any damages, or depreciating the leased vehicle for accident repairs. If it's different for Toyotas, then I was working at the wrong dealership. However, Toyota's always command the highest prices (and profits) on the used car market, so getting good-looking, one-owner pre-owned Toyotas would always be a priority. They're the only kind of used car I'd ever buy!

 

Kinda makes me wonder. My '03 Corolla is over 6 years old and still hasn't got 60K miles on it yet, though it will soon. Still, it's 30K miles lower than where it should be, on average. Maybe I should sell it and get an '09 or a '10. Problem is, there is just no need. The car is essentially perfect -- but I'd like to have one that was back under warranty.

Parts are designed to break right after the warranty period is over.

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