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Alzzy

Spark Plugs?

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I'm pretty sure they are separate companies and are competitors. They might contract out to each other - happens all the time in automotive circles. Toyota has contracts with both companies - they promote Denso first then NGK - since Denso corp split off from the parent Toyota. I know with my Honda - NGK was the primary supplier, then Denso as a comparable replacement.

 

Weird but true - since both companies are contracted for OEM suppilers for Toyota - not unusal to see a V-6 or V-8 powered Toyota or Lexus with NGK in one bank and Denso in the other. I've seen it more than a handful of times on the Tundra and some of the midline Lexus. Since they did that at the factory and no one has really complained about it - the two sets of plugs must be very comperable.

i'm still pretty sure that NGK is a subsidiary of Denso, both are founded in the same year and both Denso and NGK websites cross reference each others plugs and both share ALOT of the same 'technology'.

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How often should I changed plugs? every 5000Kms?

 

I currently use NGK Iridium plugs (BKR5EIX-11 ). Are they a good choice if am not using a supercharged app?

 

Reason I ask - for a supercharged app that you where entertaining - an Iridium plug will make for a poor choice. ---What plug would make for a good choice in a superchargerd app?

Edited by Alzzy

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How often should I changed plugs? every 5000Kms?

 

I currently use NGK Iridium plugs (BKR5EIX-11 ). Are they a good choice if am not using a supercharged app?

 

Reason I ask - for a supercharged app that you where entertaining - an Iridium plug will make for a poor choice. ---What plug would make for a good choice in a superchargerd app?

 

I hear lots of people using a copper plug with the S/C and I think that's what TRD ships with their S/C.

 

I would check with the manufacturer on the Iridium plug life. My stock NKGs were rated at 90,000 miles (145,000 K). My Densos are rated for 30,000 miles (48,000 K). I hear many people say they change the Densos at 20,000 miles, which is where I'll probably check mine.

 

Maybe someone else can explain the theory behind using the copper plugs with FI applications.

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NGK IX Iridium plugs are pretty good for a N/A application - rated lifespan varies greatly, depending on driving conditions and care. NGK generally recommends about 100,000 km (~62K miles) for average lifespan. I've seen them run as high as almost 200,000 km (~125K miles) to as low as 30,000 km (~18K miles).

 

Generally speaking - you should not run a multi-electrode platinum plug or Iridium plug in a forced induction car, at the very least, not during the initial tuning phase. Reason being, the plug will be subjected to extreme temps and detonation (possible physical damage - Iridium and PLatinum will heavily damage your engine if they break up due to sever detonation - copper will generally yield slightly and better at dissipating heat at the electrode). They wiill also foul incredibly quickly (I've gone through plugs at a rate of every 2,000-3,000 km (~1500 miles) when I tune a forced induction car. Once the tune gets right on the money - you can run a single electrode platinum plug for longer life - but most stick to a copper plug (lower resistance than platinum - more spark energy delivered to engine).

 

For your application now - stick with the NGKs. Once you start building your engine up - change plugs to fit the situation at hand.

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This Sunday I was watching a tv show on Spike called Horsepower TV

(or was it Powerblock TV?).

They did side-by-side testing of E3 Spark Plugs and some other

type (stock I believe) for a LS1 engine hooked up to a dyno.

The E3 spark plugs added about 5.5 HP AND gave a better fuel economy.

 

They also showed the two going off side-by-side inside some special

device and the E3s had a visibly larger spark.

 

I did some searching on the Internet and found at least one other

source - http://www.autofieldguide.com/articles/020503.html - which

backs this up.

 

These are available for 9th gen Corollas (gaps already set) and I ordered a

set from jcwhitney.com for $6 a piece to give them a try.

 

Keep in mind, though, that this testing was done on an engine which

was already producing over 400 HP. 5.5/400 = about 1.3%. Does that mean that

for a little Corolla engine with 126 HP the 1.3% increase will be about 1 HP?

You decide.

Edited by Maxim Schwartz

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