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twinky64

Drum Shoes Good After 50kmi

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I have a 98 corolla and got my front rotors replaced due to constant warping. I had the rear shoes checked and there is still 3/32 in left on them. I don't understand. I've had like 3 brake changes and have driven50k mi and yet I still have good meat on my rear shoes. On the 8th gen corolla, while stopping, does the car use the rear drums to assist in braking at all or is it just the front rotors/axle doing ALL of the stopping? If so, then that would mean I only use the rear shoes while pulling the handbrake then right?

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If the Corolla is like any other car out there, then the braking force should be somewhat, but not totally biased to the front. The number I've always seen is 60 percent front, 40 percent rear. Therefore, your front brakes are always providing 20 percent more stopping force than the rears, and naturally they should wear faster. 50 Kilomiles is not a lot of wear for rear drum brakes, yours sound quite normal to me. My guess is they should not need to be changed more than once or twice during the normal lifespan of the car, whereas the fronts would need several changes.

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50K miles on rear drums - is no problem, especially with FWD cars. As mentioned in the above two posts - your front brakes do the bulk of the braking job. Weight distribution is already 60/40 or 63/37 split (depending on generation) bias to the front and with braking - the forward weight shift will make it feel like 80/20. If you were able to wear the rear drum brake shoes down in 50K - then I would worry (ie riding the brakes, brakes misadjusted, driving around with the parking brake on, etc.)

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It is actually possible to warp your rotors even when fairly new. A few years ago on a cold wintery night just after work and just a few moments from work...without having to touch the brakes yet......I was going about 60mph and had to hit the brakes suddenly as a deer ran out in front of me and I missed him, but after that my front wheel was wobbling. It turns out the brake rotor was cold and when I suddenly braked, adding friction, the rotor was FUBAR and I ended up replacing both fronts.

FUBAR is actually an interesting word and is good to know the history of it.

Edited by muzak

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The front brakes do most of your cars braking. The rear shoes do wear out and so do the front disk brake pads. Your rear drums can last the life of your car, as long as you change the rear brake shoes before they score (put grooves in) the drums. They are a smooth surface (usually of a harder material than the shoes) that the shoes press against for braking action. Normally what will wear out is the shoes, and not the drums.

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Thank you all. All I was hinting at was brake bias and normality but the extras are good. I do alot of freeway driving in so cal and there are times when I have to stop from 80 as fast as I can, or a semi cuts me off and attempts to run me off the road. I need mad ventilation and cooling. I just changed the pads to ceramic and front brake rotors to these:

 

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/TOYOTA-CORO...sspagenameZWDVW

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drilled rotors, especially cheap ebay ones, are not good for street driving. in about a year you'll be replacing them due to cracks or warping.

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drilled rotors, especially cheap ebay ones, are not good for street driving. in about a year you'll be replacing them due to cracks or warping.

I thought drilled brake rotors were better, since they keep a little cooler under hard braking and also they shed water faster, for stopping in rain or wet roads??

I thought about switching to drilled rotors, but didn't think they were worth the extra expense.

I know any rotor can get worn or warp - are drilled rotors more susceptible to warping??

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I have a 98 corolla and got my front rotors replaced due to constant warping. I had the rear shoes checked and there is still 3/32 in left on them. I don't understand. I've had like 3 brake changes and have driven50k mi and yet I still have good meat on my rear shoes. On the 8th gen corolla, while stopping, does the car use the rear drums to assist in braking at all or is it just the front rotors/axle doing ALL of the stopping? If so, then that would mean I only use the rear shoes while pulling the handbrake then right?

 

the rear drums are there just for cosmetics, actually they last

100 -200k miles on the older corollas, basically the life to the car.

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drilled rotors, especially cheap ebay ones, are not good for street driving. in about a year you'll be replacing them due to cracks or warping.

I thought drilled brake rotors were better, since they keep a little cooler under hard braking and also they shed water faster, for stopping in rain or wet roads??

I thought about switching to drilled rotors, but didn't think they were worth the extra expense.

I know any rotor can get worn or warp - are drilled rotors more susceptible to warping??

yes, theres less material there. when the metal expands and contracts the rotor is stressed, what happens when you put a bunch of holes in something thats being stressed? the cast iron rotor will get cracks around and between the holes. most ebay drilled rotors have the holes drilled AFTER the casting, which causes all sorts of metalurgical problems. REAL drilled rotors arent drilled at all, but the holes are cast when the the rotor is made, then a chamfer is drilled on each side of the hole to releive strain and reduce the chance of cracking. even tho, a drilled rotor is alot more likely to crack than a plain or slotted one. its an easily researchable topic, stoptech has some good information about it. usually i dont like vendor information but in this case, stoptech is very reputable with the information they provide on the site. even they say that for street use drilled rotors arent recomended.

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drilled rotors, especially cheap ebay ones, are not good for street driving. in about a year you'll be replacing them due to cracks or warping.

I thought drilled brake rotors were better, since they keep a little cooler under hard braking and also they shed water faster, for stopping in rain or wet roads??

I thought about switching to drilled rotors, but didn't think they were worth the extra expense.

I know any rotor can get worn or warp - are drilled rotors more susceptible to warping??

yes, theres less material there. when the metal expands and contracts the rotor is stressed, what happens when you put a bunch of holes in something thats being stressed? the cast iron rotor will get cracks around and between the holes. most ebay drilled rotors have the holes drilled AFTER the casting, which causes all sorts of metalurgical problems. REAL drilled rotors arent drilled at all, but the holes are cast when the the rotor is made, then a chamfer is drilled on each side of the hole to releive strain and reduce the chance of cracking. even tho, a drilled rotor is alot more likely to crack than a plain or slotted one. its an easily researchable topic, stoptech has some good information about it. usually i dont like vendor information but in this case, stoptech is very reputable with the information they provide on the site. even they say that for street use drilled rotors arent recomended.

 

Where are drilled rotors recommended for??

What is recommended for street use - non-drilled rotors?

Aren't rotors and pads better than drums and shoes??

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drilled rotors, especially cheap ebay ones, are not good for street driving. in about a year you'll be replacing them due to cracks or warping.

I thought drilled brake rotors were better, since they keep a little cooler under hard braking and also they shed water faster, for stopping in rain or wet roads??

I thought about switching to drilled rotors, but didn't think they were worth the extra expense.

I know any rotor can get worn or warp - are drilled rotors more susceptible to warping??

yes, theres less material there. when the metal expands and contracts the rotor is stressed, what happens when you put a bunch of holes in something thats being stressed? the cast iron rotor will get cracks around and between the holes. most ebay drilled rotors have the holes drilled AFTER the casting, which causes all sorts of metalurgical problems. REAL drilled rotors arent drilled at all, but the holes are cast when the the rotor is made, then a chamfer is drilled on each side of the hole to releive strain and reduce the chance of cracking. even tho, a drilled rotor is alot more likely to crack than a plain or slotted one. its an easily researchable topic, stoptech has some good information about it. usually i dont like vendor information but in this case, stoptech is very reputable with the information they provide on the site. even they say that for street use drilled rotors arent recomended.

 

Where are drilled rotors recommended for??

What is recommended for street use - non-drilled rotors?

Aren't rotors and pads better than drums and shoes??

drilled are ok for racing where you change the rotors often, sometimes after each session.

plain or slotted

yes, disc brakes are better than drums, i didnt say otherwise did i?

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drilled rotors, especially cheap ebay ones, are not good for street driving. in about a year you'll be replacing them due to cracks or warping.

I thought drilled brake rotors were better, since they keep a little cooler under hard braking and also they shed water faster, for stopping in rain or wet roads??

I thought about switching to drilled rotors, but didn't think they were worth the extra expense.

I know any rotor can get worn or warp - are drilled rotors more susceptible to warping??

yes, theres less material there. when the metal expands and contracts the rotor is stressed, what happens when you put a bunch of holes in something thats being stressed? the cast iron rotor will get cracks around and between the holes. most ebay drilled rotors have the holes drilled AFTER the casting, which causes all sorts of metalurgical problems. REAL drilled rotors arent drilled at all, but the holes are cast when the the rotor is made, then a chamfer is drilled on each side of the hole to releive strain and reduce the chance of cracking. even tho, a drilled rotor is alot more likely to crack than a plain or slotted one. its an easily researchable topic, stoptech has some good information about it. usually i dont like vendor information but in this case, stoptech is very reputable with the information they provide on the site. even they say that for street use drilled rotors arent recomended.

 

Where are drilled rotors recommended for??

What is recommended for street use - non-drilled rotors?

Aren't rotors and pads better than drums and shoes??

drilled are ok for racing where you change the rotors often, sometimes after each session.

plain or slotted

yes, disc brakes are better than drums, i didnt say otherwise did i?

 

The new cars seem to have disk brakes all around - is it worth considering to convert my rear drum brakes to disk??

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drilled rotors, especially cheap ebay ones, are not good for street driving. in about a year you'll be replacing them due to cracks or warping.

I thought drilled brake rotors were better, since they keep a little cooler under hard braking and also they shed water faster, for stopping in rain or wet roads??

I thought about switching to drilled rotors, but didn't think they were worth the extra expense.

I know any rotor can get worn or warp - are drilled rotors more susceptible to warping??

yes, theres less material there. when the metal expands and contracts the rotor is stressed, what happens when you put a bunch of holes in something thats being stressed? the cast iron rotor will get cracks around and between the holes. most ebay drilled rotors have the holes drilled AFTER the casting, which causes all sorts of metalurgical problems. REAL drilled rotors arent drilled at all, but the holes are cast when the the rotor is made, then a chamfer is drilled on each side of the hole to releive strain and reduce the chance of cracking. even tho, a drilled rotor is alot more likely to crack than a plain or slotted one. its an easily researchable topic, stoptech has some good information about it. usually i dont like vendor information but in this case, stoptech is very reputable with the information they provide on the site. even they say that for street use drilled rotors arent recomended.

 

Where are drilled rotors recommended for??

What is recommended for street use - non-drilled rotors?

Aren't rotors and pads better than drums and shoes??

drilled are ok for racing where you change the rotors often, sometimes after each session.

plain or slotted

yes, disc brakes are better than drums, i didnt say otherwise did i?

 

The new cars seem to have disk brakes all around - is it worth considering to convert my rear drum brakes to disk??

ive been trying to make up a shopping list of parts needed. i think 5th or 4th gen celicas and maybe older camrys and corollas had rear disc setups that swap right over. but im not 100% sure. i think prizm GSI and its corolla counterpart are direct swaps.

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