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gramparsons

1zzfe Longevity

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It all depends on many things - your travels, driving behaviour and maintenence. You cannot say x motor will last for 20 years. A car driven around town on 10,000km dino oil changes will not last as long as a highway car that uses mobil 1 on a 5000 km change interval.

 

Still I'd be surprised if it lasts as long as the 7A-FE because of extra moving parts and extra strain the motor is under.

Edited by c2105026

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OK, how about this question:

 

Would you expect that, all things being equal (service, driving habits, etc), the new engine would last longer or less than the previous generation (before the fzz) Corolla engines?

 

Is it build to last longer? Someone mentioned more moving parts. What, more valves? Is it under more stress because of the output/economy? Does the use of aluminum shorten the lifespan?

 

I don't care how long a string is.

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Gram,

 

I've never know anybody with any Toyota where the engine died before 150k. Most of the people I know who have owned their Toyotas long term have between 200k and 300k with no engine problems. I have no doubt that Toyota has engineered the engine in the current generation Corolla to be just as reliable as the previous engines. As long as you maintain it properly, the engine will outlast your interest with the car.

Edited by the99contour

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Gram,

 

I've never know anybody with any Toyota where the engine died before 150k. Most of the people I know who have owned their Toyotas long term have between 200k and 300k with no engine problems. I have no doubt that Toyota has engineered the engine in the current generation Corolla to be just as reliable as the previous engines. As long as you maintain it properly, the engine will outlast your interest with the car.

Many folks have said that.

 

My interest with the car pretty much ended the minute I drove it off the lot. It is strickly a how-cheap-can-I-make-my-100-mile-commute decision. It's been good so far, but the longer it lasts the better that equation gets.

 

So, I'm already out of love with it. Even when I do decide to get an around-town vehicle (boy, do I miss my F150) when the 'Rolla reaches beater status (at 55k on an '04 model, she's still a loooong way from beater but it won't take long to get there), I'm hoping to drive it into the ground and leave it in a flaming heap on the side of the interstate.

 

Then, I'll probably go pick up another cheapest-to-drive car. If the 'rolla makes it to 300k, it'll probably be another Corolla. Something less than 200k, then there are more attractive alternatives.

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OK, how about this question:

 

Would you expect that, all things being equal (service, driving habits, etc), the new engine would last longer or less than the previous generation (before the fzz) Corolla engines?

 

Is it build to last longer? Someone mentioned more moving parts. What, more valves? Is it under more stress because of the output/economy? Does the use of aluminum shorten the lifespan?

 

I don't care how long a string is.

Newer 1zz-fe have variable intake valve timing. There was a discusion here a few weeks ago how the VVT can be an another wear item.

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Gram,

 

I've never know anybody with any Toyota where the engine died before 150k. Most of the people I know who have owned their Toyotas long term have between 200k and 300k with no engine problems. I have no doubt that Toyota has engineered the engine in the current generation Corolla to be just as reliable as the previous engines. As long as you maintain it properly, the engine will outlast your interest with the car.

Over couple of years there were several reports here with premature failure of 1zz-fe.

I remember at least one with failed rod at 60000, something unheard of in the older corolla engine design. It possibly could be a fallout of oil burning issues in early production of 1zz-fe.

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OK, how about this question:

 

Would you expect that, all things being equal (service, driving habits, etc), the new engine would last longer or less than the previous generation (before the fzz) Corolla engines?

 

Is it build to last longer?  Someone mentioned more moving parts.  What, more valves?  Is it under more stress because of the output/economy?  Does the use of aluminum shorten the lifespan?

 

I don't care how long a string is.

Newer 1zz-fe have variable intake valve timing. There was a discusion here a few weeks ago how the VVT can be an another wear item.

relax guys, my 03 has 60k miles right now, the engine is quiet as new although the body is starting to rattle alittle more. Still has good gas mileage and has never failed yet. Been changning now with dino at 6k miles, the toyotas recommendation.

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Gram,

 

I've never know anybody with any Toyota where the engine died before 150k. Most of the people I know who have owned their Toyotas long term have between 200k and 300k with no engine problems. I have no doubt that Toyota has engineered the engine in the current generation Corolla to be just as reliable as the previous engines. As long as you maintain it properly, the engine will outlast your interest with the car.

Many folks have said that.

 

My interest with the car pretty much ended the minute I drove it off the lot. It is strickly a how-cheap-can-I-make-my-100-mile-commute decision. It's been good so far, but the longer it lasts the better that equation gets.

 

So, I'm already out of love with it. Even when I do decide to get an around-town vehicle (boy, do I miss my F150) when the 'Rolla reaches beater status (at 55k on an '04 model, she's still a loooong way from beater but it won't take long to get there), I'm hoping to drive it into the ground and leave it in a flaming heap on the side of the interstate.

 

Then, I'll probably go pick up another cheapest-to-drive car. If the 'rolla makes it to 300k, it'll probably be another Corolla. Something less than 200k, then there are more attractive alternatives.

 

The 1ZZ-FE engine is a newer generation that is designed to be leaner burning and more fuel efficient than the previous generation. Translated... this means the engine runs quite a bit hotter and is more sensitive to sloppy tolerances. My take on your issue is... yes, it has the possibility of matching the longevity of the older Corolla engine IF you are mindful of maintenance (especially air filters, oil changes, emissions components). NO, it isn't as "bulletproof" as the older design but then again its squeezing more horses out of less gasoline use. Here is a link to a white-paper for the 1ZZ-FE engine. Some interesting technology behind this engine... particularily the sprayed-on valve seats that are laser-shaped.

 

http://www.spyderchat.com/1zzfe.pdf

 

I've got 195 000 km on mine now and its still got good compression and doesn't eat any oil. Having problems with the VVT actuator though but again, its not an essential component of the engine. I consider crank bearings, valvetrain, crankshaft, pistons + rings, connecting rods as part of the equation of "bullet-proof". If you're driving the car in dusty conditions then for sure, you'll get less out of the engine regardless of what you drive.

 

I'm expecting at least 400 000 km from the major engine components before anything has to be overhauled.

 

Hope that's more concise.

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If Toyota's don't last as long as they used to, then Toyota will loose sales in the future. The main difference with the newer engines is oil changes. You must stay on top of this. The days of changing the oil once a year is over. Maybe if you run amsoil or something, but for regular oil, change it every 5K on your VVTi engine. Maybe even sooner if you drive hard or life in a dusty area.

 

I expect long life at a low cost. That's why I bought a Corolla. I give her fresh oil and well, I'm still under 20K miles, so that's all I've given the car. That and a TRD air filter.

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Well

 

I'm pretty close to hit 100K on the odometer after 8 years of ownership, and the way things are goung it will take me 10 years to get those magic number *250K*. I supose the engine can make it, bit not sure if other parts will joint the engine that day for selebration. In the other hand I'm going to deal with mid-age crisis....

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I've got 143,000 miles on my 98 corolla, and haven't had too much trouble with it. So far I've had to replace the starter and the fuel pressure regulator/filter. It leaks/burns about 1 qt of oil every 5000 miles, which isn't enough to worry about yet.

 

I've also got a 93 camry with 204,000 miles, that has aged very well. Makes much less noise on the road than my corolla. If I had to put money on it, I'd bet on my camry lasting longer in good condition.

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Gram,

 

I've never know anybody with any Toyota where the engine died before 150k. Most of the people I know who have owned their Toyotas long term have between 200k and 300k with no engine problems. I have no doubt that Toyota has engineered the engine in the current generation Corolla to be just as reliable as the previous engines. As long as you maintain it properly, the engine will outlast your interest with the car.

Many folks have said that.

 

My interest with the car pretty much ended the minute I drove it off the lot. It is strickly a how-cheap-can-I-make-my-100-mile-commute decision. It's been good so far, but the longer it lasts the better that equation gets.

 

So, I'm already out of love with it. Even when I do decide to get an around-town vehicle (boy, do I miss my F150) when the 'Rolla reaches beater status (at 55k on an '04 model, she's still a loooong way from beater but it won't take long to get there), I'm hoping to drive it into the ground and leave it in a flaming heap on the side of the interstate.

 

Then, I'll probably go pick up another cheapest-to-drive car. If the 'rolla makes it to 300k, it'll probably be another Corolla. Something less than 200k, then there are more attractive alternatives.

 

I would suggest you sell your car right now and get yourself one that gets 60 MPG. You are already dissapointed with the car and although the fuel mileage is good, there are cars that get much better. If you don't like the looks or the appearance, the reliability and dependability won't matter as much. You will not be happy with it unless your attitude about it changes, thus my suggestion for you to change it now. Find the very cheapest car to drive and then get that one. You may be equally unhappy, but you will not be spending a lot of money for that same unhappiness, and that may give you some satisfaction. Why drive a car you don't like??

I think you want to know at what point will the cost of repair outweighs the cost of getting rid of it and getting a replacement. By common practice, there is at least a 75% mark-up on parts and that does not include any labor to change those parts. Take the price you pay for a new car from a dealer and multiply that by 3. That is what it would cost you to get the same car, buying it piece by piece. Double that amount and that is what the repairs would cost you in labor to have someone else change the parts for you and do the normal maintenance. Your car has always been depreciating from the time it was driven out of the first dealership.

I have had cars for 12 or 13 years and those were the old cars. New cars can go even longer before it would cost you more to fix than it would be to replace. Your interest in the car will be long-gone before then and you will get something else. Just sell the car now to someone who wants it for what it is, not for how long they can stretch out it's life.

Edited by Bikeman982

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