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commuter1

P1349 Keeps Coming Back

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The instructions in WikiAnswers is fine - basically you are backprobing the O2 sensors. With a voltmeter, can be tough to spot problems, as the voltage signal is sinusoidal, which may be hard to see with some voltmeters (refresh rate). But still doable.

 

As for the PDF - I just Googled P1349 and got several links to PDFs. This one is for a Toyota MR2, but the diagnostic procedure is identical (same basic engine)

 

http://dutch.northwestmr2.com/Toyota/mr2%2...0(bank%201).pdf

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Thanks for your prompt reply. with your help I'm understanding more about my car. have been driving this car for some time but never knew so much depth about it.

 

As curiosity? can VVT Malfunction cause problem in starting the car? or is it truely a problem in starters?

 

also what other part can get damage if VVT malfunction error persists? how soon i should get it repair?

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Starting issue is completely separate from the VVT system, unless there was damage to the valvetrain as a result of a catastrophic VVT malfunction. More likely, it is an electrical connection issue with the starter (starter contacts) or even battery issue. Possible that the starter itself has gone bad - won't know for sure until you pull the starter out and have it bench tested. Earlier in your post, you mentioned the specifics of your car. Pretty hard to believe that the car is still on the original battery from the manufacturer. The OEM battery (Delphi in my car) lasted almost exactly 60 months - then completely died.

 

As far as possible damage from a VVT malfunction and the urgency to repair it? Depends on what part is causing the VVT malfunction to begin with.

 

If it is an ECM issue - then it is more or less an inconvenience. If there is something wrong with the OCV or maybe the actuator itself, it might require a new OCV or new sprocket head from Toyota. Basically you will need to rebuild one of the camshafts or a failure will cause engine damage (pistons will make contact with valves). In that worse case - you will need an engine rebuild or swap in another engine. Given what these cars are worth and whatever else is wrong with the car, might be easier to cut your losses and buy another car. But all of this is just conjecture until the car is properly diagnosed. Best thing to do - if the car is not running quite right (loss of power, engine stalling, idle is not smooth, engine pinging at speed, unusual noises), then reduce or completely stop driving the car until you are able to diagnose the problem right away. If the car is still running OK - then you have some time to figure this out. But time will eventually run out on you - find out what is wrong with the car and then you can plan on how to address the problem.

 

The worse thing you can do, right now, is just throw parts at the car - like 80% of the mechanics out there. Most will pull the code and say you need to replace this $300 or $500 part. If that doesn't work - you need to change this $300 or $500 part. If that doesn't fix it - you need to change X part for $X cost. All you have done is replace parts blindly hoping that one of them was actually defective. Most cases, I've seen people put in $500 to $2000 into a repair for a $10 part. Some cases, the car really did need all those parts - if the owner new that - they probably would have traded in the car for something else.

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After a small, persistent oil drip in my daughter's 2000 Toyota Corolla, my husband traced the problem to the head gasket. We had it replaced and then the drip was much worse. Replaced the gasket again and it's back to a small drip. Now the check engine light is coming on but it had never come on before. Had AutoZone check it twice and both times it comes up as P1349. It does say BBVVT system-bank 1 but under that shows probable cause: BB1 - open or short circuit condition; BB2 - poor electrical connection. The "mechanic" thought it might be due to his disconnecting the battery but my husband cleaned and checked the battery connections and the light still comes on.

 

We were trying to save my daughter money by going to this mechanic who has been out of work. Now it's turning into a nightmare. We've spent $500 and seem to have worse problems than the original drip. Any suggestions would be appreciated. I have made an appointment with a reputable mechanic for him to test and figure out the oil problem but he can't look at it until April 20th. The engine light coming on now seems like it must be related to the car just being worked on. Is there something electrical that would be fairly straightforward that my husband could check? Since we're still trying not to incur a huge debt for my daughter, going to the Toyota dealership sounds scary. My husband is a diesel mechanic and can do a lot but not the new computerized, impossible to get to stuff.

Edited by millier

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Hello and Welcome to the forum.

 

Headgasket? Maybe you meant valve cover gasket? That is not too hard to replace - you do have to watch the torque on the bolts (there are built in stops, but can still be overtightened) and make sure you have the correct gasket (comes with o-rings). You also need to add a little dab of gasket maker or RTV right where the timing cover meets the cylinder head - or there is a good chance that the valve cover will leak.

 

P1349 has many possible culprits - you really need someone that has experience dealing with the VVTi system on this engine family. Most common issues are mechanical in nature, so you don't have to worry about playing around with wiring - but the hard part is finding out where to start.

 

With any trouble code - make sure you start with a clean slate. Write down the exact code, reset the ECM (reset through scanner or pulling the negative terminal off the battery). I would suggest either borrowing an OBD-II scanner or buying one outright. They are pretty inexpensive, considering that the usually diagnostic fee starts at $85 at a dealership - plus you can diagnose issues right on the spot instead of taking the car in to be scanned.

 

I'd check the simple stuff - since you already had the valve cover off - did you notice any heavy deposits, gum, varnish on the valvetrain? I'd try cleaning the VVTi oil control valve filter - it is right below the OCV, both are right below the valve cover, closest to the serpentine belt. 9/10 times - if this filter screen is clogged, you will get a P1349 code and the engine will sound "rough", lots of valvetrain chatter. After that - it involves more detailed, exhaustive diagnostic work - both mechanical and eventually electrical. Try and avoid swapping parts out to find out what part is "bad" - lots of mechanics like to do that because it saves them time, but also costs you more money to pay for their "guess". Might be time to find a more qualified mechanic or bite the bullet and take it to a dealership. Good Luck.

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Hello and Welcome to the forum.

 

Headgasket? Maybe you meant valve cover gasket? That is not too hard to replace - you do have to watch the torque on the bolts (there are built in stops, but can still be overtightened) and make sure you have the correct gasket (comes with o-rings). You also need to add a little dab of gasket maker or RTV right where the timing cover meets the cylinder head - or there is a good chance that the valve cover will leak.

 

P1349 has many possible culprits - you really need someone that has experience dealing with the VVTi system on this engine family. Most common issues are mechanical in nature, so you don't have to worry about playing around with wiring - but the hard part is finding out where to start.

 

With any trouble code - make sure you start with a clean slate. Write down the exact code, reset the ECM (reset through scanner or pulling the negative terminal off the battery). I would suggest either borrowing an OBD-II scanner or buying one outright. They are pretty inexpensive, considering that the usually diagnostic fee starts at $85 at a dealership - plus you can diagnose issues right on the spot instead of taking the car in to be scanned.

 

I'd check the simple stuff - since you already had the valve cover off - did you notice any heavy deposits, gum, varnish on the valvetrain? I'd try cleaning the VVTi oil control valve filter - it is right below the OCV, both are right below the valve cover, closest to the serpentine belt. 9/10 times - if this filter screen is clogged, you will get a P1349 code and the engine will sound "rough", lots of valvetrain chatter. After that - it involves more detailed, exhaustive diagnostic work - both mechanical and eventually electrical. Try and avoid swapping parts out to find out what part is "bad" - lots of mechanics like to do that because it saves them time, but also costs you more money to pay for their "guess". Might be time to find a more qualified mechanic or bite the bullet and take it to a dealership. Good Luck.

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Thank you for your quick response. After all the discussion for about 2 weeks, I'm positive it was the head gasket but I'll check with my husband. It was hard to get to and he doesn't have the right tools. The valve cover would be right on top, right? That was not where the oil was coming from.

 

I will print out your response for my husband. My gut is telling me to not drive it and take it to the reputable mechanic this Monday. If I don't hear from you again, I will let you know the outcome. Thanks again.

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Correct, the valve cover is on top of the engine, underneath the plastic engine garnish.

 

It is quite unusual to get an oil leak from a blown headgasket, usually it involves coolant issues (water jacket is closest to the outside of the engine there, oil is usually pumped in from the bottom).

 

If it was the headgasket - you have to check both the cylinder head and block for warping - otherwise the problem will keep returning (spent all that money for nothing).

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Most common brands that you are likely to run into are Actron and Innova. Both make decent scanners - many support multiple protocals (CAN, ISO, PWM, etc.) - which wasn't the case before. Pretty much any scanner you can find will work just fine.

 

Online vendors, autoparts stores and major retail outlets are good places to look. The basic scanners run around the $50-$60 price range (Actron PocketScan and Innova 3030), the more expensive models generally add additional features like I/M compliance testing and freeze frame/data logging capability. Those are not critical for everyone - but they are very helpful features that can help diagnose the issue at hand, if you can make use of them.

 

I picked up an Innova 3100 scanner some years ago - usually retails for $100-$130, I got it at Wal*Mart for about $65. Sears sometimes will put some decent sales on their test equipment too - just keep an eye out for them.

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You are our hero, at least for now! My husband followed your instructions and cleaned the oil control valve filter. He figures when the guy took everything apart to get to the head, he stirred things up. Husband then disconnected and reconnected the battery. I drove the car afterward, further than it took previously for the check engine light to come on and it never came on. Also, we had both noticed it being noisy after the head gasket change and it ran great this afternoon after the filter was cleaned. It will probably be a while before our paranoia subsides and we quit expecting the CEL to come on but we both really feel you gave us the solution. That seemed even worse than the oil leak to us. Too bad you can't work on that! :)

 

Thank you so much for the suggestion. I guess that makes your odds better than 9/10 now!

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I forgot I was supposed to ask you something - my daughter only does what my husband calls "stop and go" driving. She has a disability and all of us are comfortable with her driving only in town. Occasionally, she drives 50 mph but for the most part, drives 35 to and from work 5 miles away. My husband wondered if you would recommend a certain oil that would keep the engine clean or if there is such a thing that would improve her car's performance. The car has 100,000 miles on it but she bought it about 3 years ago and it would have had highway miles before she bought it. Just thought we would ask since we're so impressed with you.

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You are our hero, at least for now! My husband followed your instructions and cleaned the oil control valve filter. He figures when the guy took everything apart to get to the head, he stirred things up. Husband then disconnected and reconnected the battery. I drove the car afterward, further than it took previously for the check engine light to come on and it never came on. Also, we had both noticed it being noisy after the head gasket change and it ran great this afternoon after the filter was cleaned. It will probably be a while before our paranoia subsides and we quit expecting the CEL to come on but we both really feel you gave us the solution. That seemed even worse than the oil leak to us. Too bad you can't work on that! :)

 

Thank you so much for the suggestion. I guess that makes your odds better than 9/10 now!

Great to hear that - that little filter is almost always overlooked, unless the mechanic had experience with this particular engine family. Hopefully that permanently solves the noise issue. Thanks for posting back on that it worked, really helps others in a similar situation find a possible solution.

 

 

I forgot I was supposed to ask you something - my daughter only does what my husband calls "stop and go" driving. She has a disability and all of us are comfortable with her driving only in town. Occasionally, she drives 50 mph but for the most part, drives 35 to and from work 5 miles away. My husband wondered if you would recommend a certain oil that would keep the engine clean or if there is such a thing that would improve her car's performance. The car has 100,000 miles on it but she bought it about 3 years ago and it would have had highway miles before she bought it. Just thought we would ask since we're so impressed with you.

Any quality motor oil will work well in this case - the key is more frequent oil change interval and keeping an eye on oil levels in the mean time. Might also be a good idea to take the car on longer weekend trip to help burn off accumulated combustion chamber contaminants and burn off any moisture in the crankcase. A 5 mile trip is barely enough time to get the car up to operating temps. In any case, I wouldn't leave the oil in the any longer than 6 months - even if she put a several hundred miles on the oil in that time - I'd change the oil atleast twice a year.

 

Running a good synthetic motor oil will help with solvency issues (helps keep the motor clean), semi-synthetics (blends) - especially the high mileage variants have good reviews, diesel motor oils - especially the newer API rated ones (CJ-4 now?). Those are much less harmful than older variants, as they don't poison the catalytic converter as quickly as before. Diesel oils generally have lots of dispersancy qualities, compared to conventional motor oils - just keep the viscosity range close to the engine's recommended viscosity, i.e. - don't run a 15W-40 if the engine calls for 5w-30. It won't "hurt" the engine - but you will note a significant reduction in fuel economy. But don't be discouraged with conventional oils - current formulations are quite good, some are even better than previous formulations of synthetic motor oils. Again, frequent oil change intervals is the key - since the engine will stay hot enough to burn off normal contaminants - you can help by draining those out frequently.

 

Maintanence on other items should also be kept up as well. Cleaning the throttle body on a regular basis will help keep idle quality in check. Remove and read plugs often - take note of anything unusual. Especially the PCV valve - make sure it is clear. If there are signs of excessive moisture contamination - oil starting to gel, sludge on the bottom of the oil fill cap, PCV is heavily clogged, lots of varnish/carbon buildup in the throttle body - catching it early and addressing the issue will make sure the engine has a long life.

 

 

I looked at your photos and honestly was expecting fishing photos!

I get that once and a while too. Though, I'm an avid fisherman, haven't had much free time to enjoy it. Plus, most people don't have nearly as many questions about fishing as they do with cars. :D

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Here's the update from a couple of weeks ago. The check engine light DID soon reappear. We got it into a shop we've heard good things about but you can't get into them quickly (should have been a clue). The continuing oil drip was indeed from the head gasket and he said they ALWAYS have the head resurfaced at the machine shop because you can't just put a level on the head and the gasket is very unforgiving regarding any warpage whatsoever. The check engine light was coming on because apparently the first guy had dropped and broken something regarding valve timing. It is a brass tubular looking thing and about an inch was broken off - replacement was $95. I can clarify this if anyone really wants to know. :) Anyway, after my being without a car for almost a month because we had to loan our daughter one, we are picking up the car this morning. Yay!

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