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Guest greg_indiana

Tornado Fuel Saver

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Snake Oil.

 

I've read tests that have shown imperical data on the tornado thingie. They don't work! I wish I still had the info to share, but it's been several years. Keep your car in a good state of tune, unload the boat anchor from the trunk, tires properly inflated COMBINED with good driving habbits, and you'll do just fine. Take the $70 and go out for a fun night on the town.

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Don't waste your money.

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Total waste of money! I've read many articles about them and even watched a couple of local television stations do a consumer product test on them and the advice was always the same; don't waste your time and your money!!!!

 

The only way they "work" is to unconsciously make you aware of their presence when you are testing their effectiveness. You will probably become more mindful of your driving habits and you will adjust accordingly; (No jack rabbit starts/stops, use cruise control on the highway, etc.) Thus, you may actually see some kind of benefit, but, it would be due to the driver and NOT the device!!!!

 

Just my two cents worths!!!

 

regards,

 

timkedz

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I'm not sure why this tread isn't dead, but oh well. This is one product that I'm actually surprised is legal. First of all, it is a restriction in the intake. Also, if anyone believes that water and air flow the same, "should" buy this product.

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I read a review by someone fairly reputable (can't remember if it was Consumer Union or a newspaper), but their tests did not show any difference with this device. If you want to save gas, make sure all 4 tires are properly inflated, take off easy from stops, and coast before you have to brake. A K&N filter can increase horsepower, but I've read complaints about the oil from the filter getting on the MAF sensor, and causing runability problems.

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I read a review by someone fairly reputable (can't remember if it was Consumer Union or a newspaper), but their tests did not show any difference with this device. If you want to save gas, make sure all 4 tires are properly inflated, take off easy from stops, and coast before you have to brake. A K&N filter can increase horsepower, but I've read complaints about the oil from the filter getting on the MAF sensor, and causing runability problems.

Good points - a properly driven and tuned car with proper tire inflation will get better gas mileage than any air intake gimmic.

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Greg,

 

I have installed (over two years now) the Tornado on a 91 Ply. mini van and a 89 Camry, and have seen an improvement in MPG and also performance.

Don

 

THen you are truly the ONLY one ...

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Only way this thing would help you out with MPG is if you sharpened the heck out of it and glued it to your accellerator pedal and drove barefoot. There are so many proven methods of obtaining better MPG. I'd stay away from the Tornado and try any of the following:

- Just drive slower

- Correct tire pressure

- Stop hauling around tons of crap in your trunk if you don't have too

- Experiment with local gas stations to see if there is a difference (probably not very noticcable, so just buy the cheapest)

- Upgrade fluids to higher viscosity

- Upgrade air filter (possible even a cold air intake)

- Upgrade to high flow mufler

- Try riding a bike every now and then

 

Good luck,

Dave

Also recommended is keeping your car properly tuned.

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Wait, "possibly a cold air intake?" Wouldn't you want a warm air intake if you were going for mileage?

I think cooler air entering the intake manifold mixes better with the fuel injectors to get a better detonation.

Most cars have a tube that brings in outside air into the manifold. Cold air intakes would improve performance and give better mileage.

Also the less restricted the intake air, the better. That is why a lot of people get the K&N air filters and get rid of the stock air box.

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WAI (warm air intakes) vs CAI (cold air intakes) - which is better for fuel economy? Depends on the car, and driving conditions. I remember WAI on older carburated cars - mostly, heating the intake air charge helped atomize the fuel mix better - producing a much better mix for combustion. WAI have also been used fairly successfully on some newer cars - though results can vary. Problem lies in how the engine computer reacts to the temperature hike. Some will retard the timing - yield both lower power and poor fuel economy. Some will just happily chug along and adjust the throttle and fuel accordning to the air temperature. For off idle to moderate cruising speeds - works best with a WAI setup. Very sound design - warming air means less fuel needed (air is less dense), reduced density leads to the computer opening up the throttle (improved pumping efficiency at low throttle applications). Downside is generally reduced power - meaning slower starts from a standstill. Effectively, it automatically changes your driving style - hence where most of the fuel economy gains are yielded from.

 

Where WAI breaks down - is where CAI come in. Pulling in a cooler intake charge, colder air, means more oxygen, denser air is able to be feed into the engine. More air means more gas - no way around that, people that actually see any fuel economy savings are from changes in driving style. But where it start to make sense is at WOT (wide open throttle). Here you want to cram as much air as possible, works at lower speeds as well - but CAI really shine at higher RPMs. More power means you get up to speed quicker and be able to cruise sooner - again, modifies your driving style and if the conditions are right - you might save some fuel. Most cases, unlikely, especially if your right foot is on the heavy side.

 

Which way works better?? Either start out with making a little less power and in turn burning less fuel or add some higher RPM breathing and performance to you get up to cruise speed faster - six of one, half a dozen of the other.

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I don't know much about carbs, but depending on the air regulator for fuel injected cars, the way the air passes the air meter can make a difference.

 

A simple in box K&N filter on a 03-04 Mustang Cobra can yield 30WHP. Not so much because of all the improved air flow, but because it changes the air flow and tricks the air meter. It leans the engine out.

 

So, any product that changes the way air goes pass the air meter, can make a difference.

 

It's still a bad ideal tho. It's a cheap POS product. I remember a post that made it's way around many car forums that showed a Honda S2000 that had sucked a tornado in to the engine.

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