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Guest mpls

What grade of gas to use?

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Guest mpls

Hi,

 

I've been using Ultra Premium gas on my 2003 Corolla LE but friends have told me that I'm overdoing it and that just normal unleaded would work just fine on the Corolla -- and that, in fact, the car's designed for the lower grade gas.

 

Anyone have suggestions as to what gas to choose?

 

Thanks!!

 

-Charlotte

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Guest Paul Cherubini

Don't listen to anyone except the owners manual. The owners manual says to use "octane rating 87 OR HIGHER" . Thus Toyota engineers consider 87 the MINIMUM ACCEPTABLE octane rating but 87 is adequate if you only plan to keep your Corolla about 10 years or 150,000 miles. If you plan to keep it longer than that and want it to still be reliable then continue to use premium gas as it is best for long engine life plus it's high detergency prevents costly fuel and emission system problems like semi-clogged fuel injectors and semi-clogged catalytic converters and EGR valves.

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i have tried the higher octane on occasion, it seems

the toyota engine adjusts to the different

octanes to extract energy efficiently from all the

different octanes by the way it behaves.

On an older nissan sentra, you'd get just alittle more

mileage with noticeably improved power while the toyota , you

don't notice the power improvement but the meileage

jumps alot. The older nissan was perhaps pre tuned for

87 and perhaps was not as efficient at 89

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Or one could use the 87 or 89 octane and run the occassional bottle of fuel injector cleaner thru the system.

 

In some cars (perhaps not Toyotas or the Corolla), you should NOT run 92/93 octane. Those cars ar enot set up to make any use from the higher octane, and it can actually cause problems.

 

Those in higher altitudes, or those that have "modified" the engine, may need to up the octane as needed.

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Guest Paul Cherubini

Access-denied, my information is based on real world Toyota driving experience. Example: here is photographic proof of how using premium gas and genuine Toyota parts and filters practically eliminated metal to metal engine wear on my Toyota engine even after 423,700 miles http://www.saber.net/~monarch/valveadscrew.jpg On another forum, Ted Stanwood, a 61 year old well known Portland, OR engine rebuilder made the following comment when he saw this picture: "if those are the originals, the wear is exceptional, and quite simply I have

never seen that before with the kind of mileage you state. Much more common is to see the beginning pitting, or multiple wear patterns due to normal valve adjustments over time."

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PC, how does gas grade affect wear on valve adjustment screw? I admire your "real word Toyota driving experience", but example you have submitted to back up your myth ( if you remember I asked to do so back in February) is total BS.

 

How come I don't see picture of you truck and corolla on you web page?

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Hey mpls,

 

Calculate out the cost savings from using premium vs regular. You'll find that, over the years, they are substantial. Toyota has indicated that 87 octane is acceptable to run in their car. They've designed the car to run on it and they've backed it up by putting it in their manual. Based on that I see no harm in using it.

 

Now, about those cost savings....If I were you, I'd apply the newly discovered funds to more frequent oil changes, coolant changes, transmission servicing, etc. to extend the life of your car and better tires, headlights, wiperblades and brakes to extend the life of you.

 

Cheers,

 

 

 

Regular Joe

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Paul !!

I don't think the big 3 automakers

like to hear your claims of

cars lasting 400 K or more.

Thank god for Rust, otherwise

these automakers would be

out of business.

 

Their business model is on an assumption

that cars last only 100k along with

unnecessary environmental costs.

As a consumer/environmenalist, I hope my toyota lasts

400k.

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To be fair to Paul, and looking at the

cost of a new car and also the higher insurance

for new cars ... I think it is better to maintain the old one.

1 car @ 400 K with extra strict maintenance costs cheaper than

3 cars @130 k with poor maintenance.

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PC, that still isn't much proof. You have shown good pictures showing that changing your oil every 3k miles with 'geninue toyota oil/oil filters' does a good job.

 

I just want some proof showing that higher octane gas makes it last 400k+ miles. Compared to lower octane gas having problems in that 400k miles.

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Guest Paul Cherubini
Calculate out the cost savings from using premium vs regular.  You'll find that, over the years, they are substantial. 

The cost savings of using regular 87 octane gas vs. premium 91/92 octane is about $2,500 over 400,000 miles - assuming premium costs 20 cents more per gallon and a car got 28 miles per gallon. However, there really isn't a $2,500 savings because the car running 87 octane is not going to get as good gas mileage due to deposits that will form on the intake valves and fuel injectors, reducing fuel efficiency. And the reduction in combustion efficiency means the EGR valve and catalytic converter will be exposed to a higher load of unburned hydrocarbons which will begin clogging them up sooner, which in turn reduces MPG even more. A third factor contributing to reduced MPG is that the engine running 87 will wear quicker and the compression pressure of the engine will decrease sooner. So by the time the car is getting only 25 MPG, the cost to run it is the same as when the car burns high octane gas and gets 28 MPG. Now factor in all the extra costs associated with repairing/replacing expensive fuel and emission control components and it is clear there is little money saved running 87 octane over 400,000 miles vs. running premium 91/92 octane, plus the car will be less responsive and enjoyable to drive.

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Paul, it is not the deposits initially

that mean less gas mileage when using 87.

Higher octane gas has more useable energy

for the internal combustion engine with Less waste/pollution,

so you get more mileage and less buildup.

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Hello All,

 

I've posted some factual information regarding fuel octane ratings and engine performace under the thread:

 

"Outstanding Fuel Economy"

 

I'd repost here, but they are long and detailed. Enjoy!

 

Cheers,

 

 

 

Regular Joe

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