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Brake Caliper, Piston Boot.


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#1 Bad_dude

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 07:41 PM

Hello every one,
I have a 99 Corolla VE.
I finished my first Corolla brake pads changed. When I took the rotor on the driver's side off, the protective piston boot was torn before I even attempt to push it back. No fluid or leaks of any kind. I cleaned off the area. The piston went in fine and seems to move freely.
I would like to know if I replace just the boot alone? If yes, then how hard to do it? Any DIY. I really don't want to replace the whole caliper and I really want to replace just the boot if possible to keep the dirt out avoiding freezing the piston all together.

Thanks.

Edited by Bad_dude, 03 February 2012 - 02:30 PM.

#2 crypticlineage

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 07:59 PM

I believe you can buy just the boot from the dealership. Here is the toyodiy part illustration for a corolla 2002:

http://www.toyodiy.c...5.html?hl=47775

Available for roughtly $4 on 1sttoyotaparts. Here is the part # 4777502090

#3 Bad_dude

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 08:52 PM

Is it easy to install?
Thanks.

#4 crypticlineage

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 09:34 PM

I am not sure, but doesn't seem that complicated. Check Haynes' manual.

By the way, did you bleed brakes?

#5 Bad_dude

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 09:51 PM

I am not sure, but doesn't seem that complicated. Check Haynes' manual.

By the way, did you bleed brakes?


I did not bleed the brakes? The fluid was flushed 6 months ago when I did the rear shoes. I didn't crack the bleeder so do I need to bleed it?
Thanks.

#6 crypticlineage

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 09:59 PM

Always a good idea after any kind of brake job. How is the braking performance? Does your pedal get stiff after pumping the brakes?

#7 Bad_dude

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 10:11 PM

Always a good idea after any kind of brake job. How is the braking performance? Does your pedal get stiff after pumping the brakes?


Right after both sides are done, I pump it slowly a few times and the pedal is right back up. Started the engine and test ride at low speed, braking often, then took it on the freeway for a few minutes of a little braking.
What worries me is that piston boot. But it looked clean around the piston. Since I live in SoCal, our weather is much more forgiving. Just like my Honda Accord outer tie rod boots and upper control arm boots all torn but grease was still in good condition in the joints. Took all the boots off check the joints and rust, replace all boots, save myself a few hundred dollars. It's going to the 4th year now and no problem yet. But my 90 Accord drives nicely, handlingwise, compare to my wife's 99 Corolla.
Fish usually gets on some times and give me some good advice. Where is he today? Lol.

Here's my brake pads change story on this link.
http://www.corolland...ds-replacement/

Edited by Bad_dude, 02 February 2012 - 10:13 PM.

#8 dom

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 04:34 AM

47775-02090 is actually the part number for front disc brake bush dust boots on the cylinder sliding pins (2 per caliper) for a 2002... (# 47769-06020 for your 1999)

http://www.utoyot8.c...&ppId=263374275
http://www.toyotapar...7-05-10366.html
http://www.toyotapar...ponentsIndex=37

What you need is a front disc brake cylinder kit # 04479-02040 (1 per front caliper). Beside your required cylinder boot, it should also include a piston seal which is also not available seperately, and set ring # 90080-52088 which secures your cylinder boot.

Front disc brake cylinder kit # 04479-02040 List Price $38.73, $27.94 from: https://www.1sttoyot...empartscat.html

From only $2.23 for the cylinder boot, set ring, and piston seal. (Enter discount code 80376926630782 in the "How Did You Hear About Us?" box to save 5%)

http://www.rockauto....1,parttype,1720

Posted Image


It looks easy enough in the 2004 Corolla Repair manual:

REMOVE CYLINDER BOOT
Using a screwdriver, remove the set ring and cylinder boot.

INSTALL CYLINDER BOOT
Apply the lithium soap base glycol grease to a new cylinder boot. Install the cylinder boot to the disc brake cylinder. Install the boot securely to the grooves of the cylinder and piston.
Using a screwdriver, install the set ring.

Edited by dom, 03 February 2012 - 05:13 AM.

#9 dom

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 04:47 AM

You could also replace the piston seal that comes in the kit, once you've removed your ripped cylinder boot:

REMOVE FRONT DISC BRAKE PISTON
Place a piece of cloth or similar, between the piston and the disc brake cylinder. Use compressed air to remove the piston from the disc brake cylinder.
CAUTION:
Do not place your fingers in front of the piston when using compressed air.
NOTICE:
Do not spatter the brake fluid.

REMOVE PISTON SEAL
Using a screwdriver, remove the piston seal from the disc brake cylinder.

REMOVE FRONT DISC BRAKE BLEEDER PLUG
Remove the bleeder plug cap and bleeder plug from the disc brake cylinder.

INSPECT BRAKE CYLINDER AND PISTON
Check the cylinder bore and piston for rust or scoring.

TEMPORARY TIGHTEN FRONT DISC BRAKE BLEEDER PLUG
Temporarily tighten the bleeder plug, and install bleeder plug cap to the disc brake cylinder.

INSTALL PISTON SEAL
Apply the lithium soap base glycol grease on a new piston seal.
Install the piston seal to the disc brake cylinder.

INSTALL FRONT DISC BRAKE PISTON
Apply the lithium soap base glycol grease on the piston.
Install the piston to the disc brake cylinder.
NOTICE:
Do not screw the piston forcedly in the disc brake cylinder.

INSTALL CYLINDER BOOT (as depicted in previous post^)

Edited by dom, 28 November 2012 - 09:38 PM.

#10 Bad_dude

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 02:35 PM

Hello,
Thanks for all of the responses guys. I know how to get the boots, however, I can't really get a clear DIY pics nor instructions. What seem simple but I ready many threads with other cars and people having trouble getting what seem simple to put on but not. I guess the reason being the boot is in between piston and caliper wall.
Perhaps some one with experience could help me.

Thanks.

#11 fishexpo101

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 05:07 PM

Sounds like you had some fun with the brake pad replacement!

Torn boot, definitely not a good thing, but not bad enough to warrant not driving around while you order the parts. Depending on your area - I've seen calipers without dust boots or ones that are shredded from old age, work perfectly for months. But they all end up seizing up on your eventually - just a matter of time. I'd say this would be more critical compared to torn boots on tierods or balljoints. Those you can sort of "cheat" and keep them covered with grease - as long as you stay out of water, as long as they hold grease, those will hold up as well.

This case, the boot replacement is not hard, just have to find the part in-stock someplace. Most places will opt to sell you a reman caliper instead of the boot - cost wise, might be pretty similar, so something to consider.

As for the dust seal - it is a pry out, push back in sort of affair - don't even need to disassemble the caliper to do so. Hardest part is getting the piston to fit correctly around the dust boot. Some people have all sorts of tricks to burp the boot, balloon trick, etc. Just take your time and you should be golden. Though they highly recommend rebuilding it, as dust and debris probably is jammed in the interior oil seal. Hence the reman option - just unbolt, install, bleed the brakes and you are good to go. Main drawback - they recommend you replace them in axle pairs for safety reasons.

Could get away with just replacing the bad caliper, but there is nothing to say the other won't fail sooner or later. I usually try to do them as axle pairs - to avoid any possible issues. Also keeps my maintenance easier to document and keep track of repairs - but that works for me, might not work for others.

Edited by fishexpo101, 03 February 2012 - 05:13 PM.

#12 Bad_dude

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 02:00 PM

ok guys. Thanks for all of the responses. I think I am going to try to rebuild the calipers on both sides.
I have a few questions before that:
1) This link, http://www.ehow.com/...ke-caliper.html Is this similar to our Corolla Calipers but ours has a retainer ring on it? Is that how to put the dust boot on?

2) The rebuilding kits: Does brand matters? I see Rock Auto has a Centric brand for only $2.31 each, they also have the Raybestos, professional grade for $4.27 each. While Oreillyauto has a brakebest brand for $3.99 each. When Raybestos says professional grade, is that much better than the other two mentioned or is that just a term used to sell at a higher price?

3) I think I am going buy 2 used OEM calipers off from Ebay and rebuild those in case I mess up. Have them ready and put them on the car after rebuilding.

4) Right now the pads are new and the torn area of the boot is recessed all the way bunching up the torn area and not exposed until the piston expand all the way to see the tear. Given that I live in SoCal, with more forgiving atmosphere, should I just drive the car like that until the pads worn down and then replace every thing at the same time? Or is this some thing I should replaced right away? I am asking this question base on your experience, especially for those who work on cars all day.

I have rebuilt an alternator before not too long ago, I am going to try on the starter next. Any suggestion on where to start looking for tips on the stater rebuild?

Thanks for all of the help.

#13 Bad_dude

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 02:20 PM

Hey guys,
I 2 calipers on Ebay from an OEM car. One with less mileage from a 2000 Corolla, it also look newer too, little rust, but the caliper does not look like the one on mine. The other one from 98 Corolla, with lots of rust on it, but seem to be on the outside with 143K miles on it. But this one looks like the one on my car.
Which one should I get? I see that little clip on the 2000 model and if that one fit, I would rather spend the extra $6 for a newer one if it fits. Please give me some advice. Both are sold from a top rated seller.
Here are the links:
http://www.ebay.com/...=item336e28142f
http://www.ebay.com/...=item3cc13990c7

Thanks.

#14 Bad_dude

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 04:36 PM

I have found this link and it looks pretty good. I'll inspect the caliper more when the replacement repair kit get here. It's only a few dollars from rockauto. I live in Fullerton, CA, rarely ever rain and never rain for too long and almost never flood. Humidity is also low compare to when I live 14 years in FL. Check out this link: http://www.e30tech.c...ead.php?t=39965
The top part is for the rear one but it seems like the Corolla's front caliper with the clip. I think the front of the dust boot goes on the piston groove and the rear of the boot goes over the caliper and held on by a clip. I should have looked closely at the caliper. I think that is the way the front corolla caliper is.
I think I am going to ride this new pad set out about 30000 miles or so then I'll replace both calipers and probably rotors too. It's not like my Honda, for the living God why Honda made capture rotors, I don't know. It's a nightmare every time I think about it.

Thanks.

#15 BShanahan14rulz

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 09:21 PM

I know that thighs is an old topic, but I had a question that goes well in here. Did you ever figure out if for the 2000 corolla front brakes, is the outer dust boot replaceable without removing the piston and rebuilding the caliper? I.E. was it like the rear caliper rebuild documented for the BMW in bad_dude's link just above my post, that could be done without removing the piston completely? Or, does the piston need to be removed before you can seat the new dust boot in the caliper?

Thanks!

Edited by BShanahan14rulz, 28 November 2012 - 09:31 PM.