Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Spark Plug And Gap


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 jendan2925

jendan2925

    Neutral

  • Active Members
  • 6 posts

Posted 22 June 2009 - 05:29 PM

Hi
What type of plug is recommended for my daughters '97 DX 1.8L and the Gap?

Thanks in advance for the input!

Joe

#2 fishexpo101

fishexpo101

    I know Karate, Kung Fu, and 47 other dangerous words...

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,472 posts

Posted 22 June 2009 - 10:01 PM

A good copper plug is all you really need. Gap would be 0.032". Some plugs recommend a 0.028" gap - but many have run a 0.032" and got good lifespan and performance (power and fuel economy).

You could run a platinum or iridium plug for longer lifespan, if you prefer not to change them every 15K-30K miles. Platinum plugs typically can last as much as 60K miles, Iridium plugs can last as much as 120K miles.

OEM brands would be NGK or Denso plugs. Stick with standard ground electrodes - the multi-pronged plugs may look nice, but can be tough to gap and some cases run worse than a plain plug.

Edited by fishexpo101, 22 June 2009 - 10:02 PM.

#3 Jeff726

Jeff726

    4th Gear

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 534 posts

Posted 12 July 2009 - 03:37 PM

http://www.ngk.com/m...432903&pid=3172

I'm looking at these for my tune up project on my 2000 LE. They cost $8.31 each, but 120K lifespan possibility is more than worth it IMO. Are coil packs a good investment? I am also looking at a PCV Valve. Any specific brand recs?

Edited by Jeff726, 12 July 2009 - 03:39 PM.

#4 Bikeman982

Bikeman982

    Bikeman982

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,211 posts

Posted 13 July 2009 - 12:36 AM

I use NGK B8ES for my 7th generation Corollas.

#5 fishexpo101

fishexpo101

    I know Karate, Kung Fu, and 47 other dangerous words...

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,472 posts

Posted 13 July 2009 - 10:24 AM

http://www.ngk.com/m...432903&pid=3172

I'm looking at these for my tune up project on my 2000 LE. They cost $8.31 each, but 120K lifespan possibility is more than worth it IMO. Are coil packs a good investment? I am also looking at a PCV Valve. Any specific brand recs?

Those are OEM plugs - great plug for the money. I'm running NGK Iridium IX plugs - little cheaper plugs (~$6.99 each), but don't last as long (so far gotten about 40K-50K tops out of the IX plugs, the IFR5T11 should last atleast twice as long).

Coil packs - don't really wear out being all solid state and completely potted up. Unless you have been noticing some misfire issues or other ignition related problems - coil packs only need to be replaced when they go bad. That said - if you can pick one up cheap - not a bad idea to have a spare. I got a lightly used one for $20 - use it for diagnostic work in the past - couldn't pass on that price.

PCV vavle - good idea to replace them every 30K-60K. Should be OK to reuse, if you clean them out. But they are pretty inexpensive (~$4) so just easily to replace them. Try hitting the dealership for that one - not much difference in price between OEM or aftermarket piece. Guaranteed fitment with OEM - some aftermarket ones don't always fit. If you have another car - you can pull the original one off and compare it to the ones at an autoparts store. Compare threads, depth, size, etc. - last time I checked, the local Autozone only had Fram PCV valves, and none of them came close to looking like the original one. www.1sttoyotaparts.com has good review for decent prices for OEM parts - www.rockauto.com has good reviews for cheap parts all around.

#6 Darth Prizm

Darth Prizm

    1st Gear

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 54 posts

Posted 24 November 2009 - 09:54 PM

The info sticker on the valve cover of my 'izm's 1ZZ states that dual side electrode plugs are required.

So that's not necessarily true? I'd really like to buy a set of Iridiums or e3's for it.

#7 fishexpo101

fishexpo101

    I know Karate, Kung Fu, and 47 other dangerous words...

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,472 posts

Posted 25 November 2009 - 11:03 AM

The earlier 1ZZ-FE (non-VVTi) used a dual electrode copper plug from the manufacturer, some dealerships went ahead and replaced them with single platinum or even iridium plugs - all in the name of longer service life (and using a more expensive plug as well). Swapping the OEM dual ground plugs with an iridium or E3 plug should be fine.

#8 Darth Prizm

Darth Prizm

    1st Gear

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 54 posts

Posted 27 November 2009 - 10:05 PM

sweet. I've heard mixed reviews about e3's... basically they work great but they burn up quick or something like that. Is this true?

#9 fishexpo101

fishexpo101

    I know Karate, Kung Fu, and 47 other dangerous words...

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,472 posts

Posted 30 November 2009 - 01:02 PM

I've heard mixed reviews with the E3 plugs as well. Depends on the engine, as some seem to like them, some do not. Don't expect more power - as plugs can never "make" power, but better designed plugs can degrade much more slowly, making their performance much more uniform. Don't believe all the hype. I could dyno a car with one set of plugs, replace them with a brand new (identical set) and can see a 1-2HP to as much as 10HP increase - just a function of "clean" plugs. Iridium plugs can wear exceptionally slowly, hence their long service lifespan - the dual pronged plugs have two ground electrodes. They basically trade off spark events, so that overall wear is leveled over the two prongs. The E3 plugs is a little different all together - has a relatively large ground electrode with lots of potential sparking edges. If they work better - will depend on the engine's tune and how sensitive it is to the flame propagation. Sometimes, a faster or hooter spark is not always better. You have to match the spark characteristics with the design of the combustion chamber for maximizing combustion and efficiency. Only thing I'd be worried with the E3 plugs is with an older engine with lots of carbon deposits - could run a potential for electrode/piston top damage from accidental contact. Having a big ground electrode could be both a boon and liability.

#10 Darth Prizm

Darth Prizm

    1st Gear

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 54 posts

Posted 30 November 2009 - 05:27 PM

I've heard mixed reviews with the E3 plugs as well. Depends on the engine, as some seem to like them, some do not. Don't expect more power - as plugs can never "make" power, but better designed plugs can degrade much more slowly, making their performance much more uniform. Don't believe all the hype. I could dyno a car with one set of plugs, replace them with a brand new (identical set) and can see a 1-2HP to as much as 10HP increase - just a function of "clean" plugs. Iridium plugs can wear exceptionally slowly, hence their long service lifespan - the dual pronged plugs have two ground electrodes. They basically trade off spark events, so that overall wear is leveled over the two prongs. The E3 plugs is a little different all together - has a relatively large ground electrode with lots of potential sparking edges. If they work better - will depend on the engine's tune and how sensitive it is to the flame propagation. Sometimes, a faster or hooter spark is not always better. You have to match the spark characteristics with the design of the combustion chamber for maximizing combustion and efficiency. Only thing I'd be worried with the E3 plugs is with an older engine with lots of carbon deposits - could run a potential for electrode/piston top damage from accidental contact. Having a big ground electrode could be both a boon and liability.




Well when I did the head gasket, cylinder # 1 was horribly carboned up but the other 3 were nice.. I cleaned the combustion chambers real good after I got the head back from the machine shop (they took .009 off of it to get it flat again..) I was kind of in a hurry and never got a chance to clean the junk off of the pistons, but it's just as well I believe because I probably would have gotten that junk down in the water jacket and been in a real pickle. I wasn't feeling like I wanted to drain the coolant out of the block to get the crud from the water jacket, you know?

Anyhoo, as far as carbon goes, #1 was the only cylinder with any appreciable carbon buildup. Having the head milled down by .009" isn't enough to risk piston-bashing, is it? If that's the case I can see why they'd spec side electrode plugs. Better safe than sorry. I think I'll just buy a set of Bosch Pl +2's and be done with it... I think I'm better off not screwing with factory recommendations for spark plug design.