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When To Flush Transmission Fluid?


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#31 ninioautista

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Posted 01 June 2015 - 01:09 PM

Yep, that's what I'll do.

I use a cardboard when it's parked and for what I could measure (just by looking at the cardboard) it probably leaks about 4/8 drops a day.

I'm still monitoring the level just to make sure I don't use it without enough fluid in it.

I'm gonna purchase another this week and probably put a hundred miles and do the transmission again this weekend and just be done with the whole thing so my wife can drive it with no problems.

 

Thanks :)


#32 ninioautista

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Posted 08 June 2015 - 10:57 AM

Ok, i got everything to do the transmission flush :)

I was wondering, is there any kind of sealant that I can use with the bolt and washer to make sure I don't have any leaks? Thanks!


#33 fishexpo101

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Posted 08 June 2015 - 03:04 PM

No sealant needed - that's what the crush washer is for. 

 

Hopefully you'll have an extra set of hands to help out.  Can do this solo, but can be messy for the first time DIYer flusher.  If the hose from the return line comes loose from the drain pan / bucket - you could hose down EVERYTHING in that area with ATF fluid. 

 

Not a firehose sort of force, but a surprising amount of fluid can be pushed out in a short amount of time.


#34 ninioautista

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Posted 09 June 2015 - 03:05 AM

No sealant needed - that's what the crush washer is for. 

 

Hopefully you'll have an extra set of hands to help out.  Can do this solo, but can be messy for the first time DIYer flusher.  If the hose from the return line comes loose from the drain pan / bucket - you could hose down EVERYTHING in that area with ATF fluid. 

 

Not a firehose sort of force, but a surprising amount of fluid can be pushed out in a short amount of time.

 

Thanks for the answer!

I actually did it by myself and since it was my 2nd time now, it was easier :)

 

I didn't see any leaking yet, however, I'm not sure how much to tighten the bolt, I did it pretty tight but I still think it could be tighter, 

I'll see tomorrow if it has any leaks and proceed from there


#35 fishexpo101

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Posted 10 June 2015 - 09:25 AM

Yeah, there isn't a lot of threads on that pan, so what you did is perfect.  Tighten it up so it is on there pretty snugly, but not "Hulk" tight.  Check on it a day or so and see if any fluid weeped out, if it did - give it another 1/4 turn or so.  If it seems too tight, could be the gasket is messed up or there is some debris stuck between the bolt and gasket, or gasket and the pan.


#36 ninioautista

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Posted 12 June 2015 - 12:37 PM

Yeah, there isn't a lot of threads on that pan, so what you did is perfect.  Tighten it up so it is on there pretty snugly, but not "Hulk" tight.  Check on it a day or so and see if any fluid weeped out, if it did - give it another 1/4 turn or so.  If it seems too tight, could be the gasket is messed up or there is some debris stuck between the bolt and gasket, or gasket and the pan.

 

 

Well, three days with no leaks and not even wet around the bolt :)

 

Thanks fishexpo for always answering :) I really appreciate it! 

 

Next step, AC Recharge :P

It's funny, all these things I didn't do while it was my only car, now that I have it  "to spare" I don't mind doing things cause in case I snip up, I can still go to work :P


#37 LeoSucena

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Posted 12 February 2016 - 05:47 AM

Hi folks, I am new here, and I really appreciate the forum and the hints posted. 
 
I have a doubt about automatic transmission:
My corolla XRS 2012 2.0 Automatic  has 31.000 miles and 48 months of life.
According to car's manual, i have to change the transmission oil every 48 months or 50.000 miles, but in my case the transmission oil is still good! 
Light pink color, very very very far for black of burnt oil's.
 
Should i change the Oil now (by time) or can i wait for 50.000 miles to change(by miles)?
 
Thanks in advance!
Hugs,
Leonardo from Brazil ;)

#38 fishexpo101

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Posted 12 February 2016 - 03:20 PM

Unfortunately, you can't really tell the condition or protection abilities of the oil by its color.  Only really way to check to see if the oil is OK - is to have it chemically tested via oil analysis.

 

Not really familiar with the Brazilian market 2012 Corolla XRS 2.0.  The last time the XRS trim designation was last used was with our 10th gen Corollas - from model years 2009-2010 with the 2.4L 2AZ-FE engines w/5-speed automatics.  So I'm not sure where the 50,000 mile/48 months came from - if it was in the factory service manual or dealership maintenance guide (I'd only believe the factory service manual one - should have a booklet with the maintenance quidlines come with the car).  In the US models - it only recommends transaxle service at 60,000 mile/60 months if driven under "special operating conditions".  It actually doesn't specify a transaxle fluid replacement until 120K miles/120 months.

 

That said - most of the transmission services are heavily dependant on driving conditions and driving style of the owner.  The intervals indicated in the factory service manual are for most conditions.  Some transaxles could actually be fine with the original transaxle fill for considerably longer than what the factory spec's - other cases, some need to change their fluids at very short intervals, do to excessive stop and go / towing, etc.

 

Also keep in mind that a service like this is not just to exchange the fluid, but to also remove any accumulated friction material during the break in process / covering the pan magnets.  This is not visible from the dipstick - you have to drop the transaxle pan to really get it all out.   The interval they give you should be read as whichever occurs first - time or mileage.

 

Can you wait to 50K miles before you change it and be OK - possibly.

 

Better question to ask yourself - if you do decide to wait until 50K miles (and roughly 77 months, given your rate of 31K miles @ 48 months) and something catastrophic happens to the transaxle that is directly related to an oil / lubrication failure - do you want to eat all the costs of replacing that transaxle yourself since you've pushed past the manufacturer's recommendation and it may not be covered under warranty (ie, abuse / neglect on owner's part)?

 

Note that it generally doesn't hurt you to replace fluids earlier - just that some owners want to maximize service interals and be more efficient with maintenance costs and old fluid disposal over the life of the car.  If you look at the overall costs - doing a fluid exchange is pretty low in cost compared to cost to replace a transaxle.  Like with most things on the car - potential damage from extending fluid intervals may not show up for many years, thousands of miles  - if and when they come up, you definitely don't want the dealership to screw you out of warranty work because they looked at the maintenance logs and see that "missed" some fluid replacement and try to stick you with a huge repair bill.