Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

When To Flush Transmission Fluid?


  • Please log in to reply
37 replies to this topic

#16 ninioautista

ninioautista

    1st Gear

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 32 posts

Posted 13 April 2015 - 06:16 PM

Hi all, sorry to bump the thread but I didn't want to start a new one.

My 2001 corolla is about to hit 138k the last time a fluid change was done it was at around 85/90k. I know I should've done it before this but I honestly forgot.

 

Anywayz, last time was not done by me, but the previous owner, and I can't find any record of where it was to know if the filter was changed or not.

I was thinking of just drain/refill my self (as it seems pretty easy) and my question was, does it make much difference if last time the filter was replaced or not? I assume that it would but I just wanted to check.

If the filter needs to be changed I rather take it to a shop, and I'll purchase the Transmission Fluid myself so I can get the stock one instead of the Dex III thing that they put in them. (here's a link if anybody is interested http://www.amazon.co.../dp/B00CTUSEMU)

 

Let me know what you guys think


Edited by ninioautista, 13 April 2015 - 06:17 PM.

#17 dom

dom

    04 Corolla CE 5spd

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,232 posts

Posted 13 April 2015 - 07:48 PM

This link works, although Toyota WS is the WRONG fluid for your 2001: http://www.amazon.co...d/dp/B00CTUSEMU

 

Light viscosity World Standard (WS) ATF is for 2009+ Corolla ONLY, and is NOT compatible with T-IV or Dexron ATF. 

 

http://freepdfhostin.../cd481dc8ae.pdf

 

Dexron III is the right type for your 2001: http://toyota-club.n...sb_tc001-02.pdf

 

Filter is just a screen strainer which can be rinsed, but your pan should still be removed to clean it and the magnet at bottom of pan. A drain and refill only takes about 3.25 quarts out of the 7.7 quart total capacity. After refilling the pan, you can do a complete fluid change by disconnecting the return line, and idling the engine to pump out a couple quarts at a time.

 

Many use and like Valvoline's MaxLife DEX/MERC ATF, even though it's of a light viscosity and is claimed to be "Recommended for use where DEXRON, DEXRON II, III and VI, Toyota T-IV and WS, MERCON®, MERCON® SP and LV, Allison TES 389, Nissan Matic-D, Matic-J and Matic-K, Honda Z-1 (except CVT), Mercedes NAG-1, Mitsubishi Diamond SP-II and SP-III and many others are required."

 

http://www.valvoline...ission-fluid/37

 

http://www.walmart.c...Gallon/15125768


Edited by dom, 14 April 2015 - 09:17 PM.

#18 ninioautista

ninioautista

    1st Gear

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 32 posts

Posted 18 April 2015 - 01:54 PM

Thanks for the answer!

I'll check those and see if i can find the original one from toyota, as fishexpo said it's better to use those

But if I cant find it I'll definitely go with them.

I'm thinking about just doing a drain and refill without opening up anything, but i'll see what I do.

 


#19 fishexpo101

fishexpo101

    I know Karate, Kung Fu, and 47 other dangerous words...

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,067 posts

Posted 21 April 2015 - 10:03 AM

For the later generations which used a specific transaxle fluid - best to stick with OEM variants.  In the case of the 8th gen Corolla - like dom mentioned, plain Dexron II/III works just great.  I've used Valvoline and Redline with great results in my 2002.

 

Drains and refills should be fine - if you do a couple of drains and refills - spaced a couple of thousands of miles apart - you can refresh the oil quite a bit, be very close to a flush at that point. 

Dropping the pan would be a good idea, as this point there are likely lots of shavings and sludge on the bottom of the pan.  But definitely look into a drain and refill - better than not doing anything and it is relatively safe / effective procedure to refresh the fluid.


#20 ninioautista

ninioautista

    1st Gear

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 32 posts

Posted 21 April 2015 - 03:17 PM

I'm going to do a regular drain and refill and i'll see what comes out :P

If i don't like what i see I'll look into taking the pan out and if I do that I'll clean the filter and probably replace the gasket.

 

Thanks so much for the help, you guys always answer so fast  :)


#21 ninioautista

ninioautista

    1st Gear

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 32 posts

Posted 27 May 2015 - 02:13 PM

Hey does anybody remember where and what tool I need to remove the drain plug? I can't seem to find it on the internet.

 

Thanks!


#22 fishexpo101

fishexpo101

    I know Karate, Kung Fu, and 47 other dangerous words...

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,067 posts

Posted 27 May 2015 - 03:23 PM

For the drain plug - it should be 14mm.  Even a standard 14mm socket should be enough to get it out - it isn't recessed, so you don't need some crazy extension or even a deep well socket.

 

I forgot to ask earlier if you had a 4-speed or 3-speed automatic.  A 4-speed (look for the O/D switch on the shifter) - will hold a little less than 4 quarts on a drain and refill.  A 3-speed has two separate reservoirs for fluid - one for the transaxle, the other for the differential.  The differential has a separate fill and drain plug on the side of the diff - easiest way at it is to remove the driver's side front wheel to get access to those diff bolts.  Transaxle here takes 2.5 quarts, the diff will take about 1.5 quarts.  Transaxle is filled through the dipstick tube, diff is filled from fill hole in the side - need to use a fluid pump or use a flexible length of tubing to fill the diff casing.  Stop filling when the fluid is one finger tip below the opening (as when you lower the car, it should be just below the fill line).

 

Assuming it is a 4-speed transaxle, drain and refill is a piece of cake.  Jack the front of the car up or drive it up onto some ramps.  Helps to have warmed the transaxle up to circulate the fluid and help dissolve as much of the deposits as possible.  Remove the bolt, drain into the pan, replace bolt (may need drain plug gasket - it is a crush type), and refill through the dipstick tube with the same amount that came out.  If unsure of the quantity, start with 2.5-3 quarts and then top off as needed.  Start car, run the shifter through each gear, pausing in each one for a couple of seconds - this will get the fluid to circulate all the fluid circuits.  Check for leaks.  If good - then drive off the ramps / drop the car.  Shift into park - with car still running, on level ground - check fluid level on dipstick (look at the cold mark - lower mark) - add fluid is needed and guard against over filling.  If you accidentally overfilled it - have to drain it out until you get to the right level.

 

Lots of videos online to walk you through the process - with either transaxle.  Once you get one of these drains and refills under your belt - the next couple of times you do this will be a breeze.


#23 ninioautista

ninioautista

    1st Gear

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 32 posts

Posted 27 May 2015 - 05:25 PM

Thanks so much fishexpo! I'll let you guys know how it went! :)

 

Oh, btw I have a 2001 4speed 


Edited by ninioautista, 27 May 2015 - 05:51 PM.

#24 ninioautista

ninioautista

    1st Gear

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 32 posts

Posted 27 May 2015 - 08:50 PM

I just did it.

It was really simple and I didn't even had to lift the car up. (well I couldn't because my jack was in the storage locker and I didn't want to drive :P)

 

But I guess that it being my first time ever doing this something had to happen.

I didn't see the gasket of the drain bolt so I thought mine didn't have one.

After I was done, i put the bolt in, adjusted it (not to much though) and continued with the process , all good.

While I was moving the old transmission fluid to an empty gallon of milk for recycling I saw the gasket :P and I have it here with me.

I didn't see any leaks or anything.

 

I suppose that nothing will be wrong and since I was going to do another fluid change in a couple thousand miles as you suggested, I think it'll be ok (I may rush the next fluid refill and do it in the next hundred miles)

 

What do you think? 
Should I start over just because of the gasket? 

 

Thanks!

 

edit: since english is not my native language I just wanted to make sure we are talking about the same "gasket", here's a pic:

eIrCg.jpg


Edited by ninioautista, 27 May 2015 - 08:54 PM.

#25 dom

dom

    04 Corolla CE 5spd

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,232 posts

Posted 27 May 2015 - 10:47 PM

Yeah it should be fine until you drain it again if it's not leaking... Since you have it in hand, you could have it matched to a nice new aluminum gasket (washer), so you'll be good and ready.


Edited by dom, 27 May 2015 - 10:48 PM.

#26 ninioautista

ninioautista

    1st Gear

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 32 posts

Posted 28 May 2015 - 01:26 AM

Yeah it should be fine until you drain it again if it's not leaking... Since you have it in hand, you could have it matched to a nice new aluminum gasket (washer), so you'll be good and ready.

Sorry, I didn't quite get that .
You're saying I should replace it for another one? or to add something else?

(thanks for answering btw :) )


Edited by ninioautista, 28 May 2015 - 01:26 AM.

#27 dom

dom

    04 Corolla CE 5spd

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,232 posts

Posted 28 May 2015 - 08:25 AM

It is recommended to replace the drain plug gasket (aluminum crush washer) with a new one if it shows any damage. Your drain plug is probably M12 x 1.25 threads, so your washer would be just over 12mm inner diameter (~1/2"). Toyota part number 35178-30010.

 

http://www.toyomotor...ansmission.html


Edited by dom, 28 May 2015 - 08:27 AM.

#28 fishexpo101

fishexpo101

    I know Karate, Kung Fu, and 47 other dangerous words...

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,067 posts

Posted 28 May 2015 - 10:00 AM

Yup that is the crush washer / gasket I was referring to earlier.  Pretty common for them to get stuck to the drain pan, usually to fall off into the bucket / drain pan during the draining process.

 

I'm with dom, as long as it is not leaking - you should be OK until the next time you do a drain and refill.  At that time, you can put on a new gasket.  You could reuse the old one, as long as the gasket is not distorted too badly.  Hard to tell from the picture, that side looks OK, but the other side might be pretty distorted.. 

 

I know on my 2002 - my washer as only good for that fill.  Tried to reuse it - and it leaked like crazy.  Ended up just running the plug without the gasket, temporarily, until I was able to stop by my parts guy to grab a couple of those gaskets.


#29 ninioautista

ninioautista

    1st Gear

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 32 posts

Posted 28 May 2015 - 05:24 PM

Well, I did a test drive on the highway and it all seemed ok transmission-wise, didn't feel anything different, neither good or bad.

 

I parked the car, checked for leaks there wasn't any dripping. I rubbed a clean paper towel all around the bolt to see if there was any liquid, there was some, but it was only went, not even a drop was forming.

 

Anyways I left a couple of paper towels on the floor covering the transmission area yesterday night  and I'll check them up today.

 

I'm not driving the Corolla as my main car anymore (I bought a 2015 Sonata) so it's just for small distances and for my wife that's learning how to drive so if there are is no dripping I'll get a new washer and do the drain and refill again in a couple hundred miles and that's it.


#30 fishexpo101

fishexpo101

    I know Karate, Kung Fu, and 47 other dangerous words...

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,067 posts

Posted 29 May 2015 - 11:17 AM

Sounds like a plan!  Little wet around the plug is to be expected in this case.  Since it isn't a daily driver - should be fine until you get around to it.  Paper towels / cardboard to monitor leaks is a good idea - if anything keeping the floor clean.