Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

30,000 Mile Service How Much It Costs?


  • Please log in to reply
27 replies to this topic

#16 Bikeman982

Bikeman982

    Bikeman982

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,211 posts

Posted 25 February 2006 - 10:21 PM

Hi Everone
My car is due for 30,000 mile warranty..I just called the toyota dealer and he said it
will cost me about $525-600 (US dollars).
Should I check with other ones also. How much is the reasonable amount to pay?

thanks

Check around for other quotes. Your car is two years old and there is many things you can do yourself that the dealer won't have to do and that can save you money.

#17 colt

colt

    2nd Gear

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 139 posts

Posted 26 February 2006 - 09:54 AM

http://www.edmunds.c...ntenanceServlet

#18 enotoga

enotoga

    2nd Gear

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 109 posts

Posted 26 February 2006 - 06:47 PM

It's already been said but I'll add my 2 cents. Dealer tune-ups on a toyota, in my opinion, are TOTALLY UNNECESSARY if you have the most basic wrench operating skills.

Oil change, tranny fluid change, air filter, drain and refill coolant, and rotate the tires,....that's it. Either do it yourself or by the parts at the Toyota dealership and pay your local corner garage $70 to do the work. It will take 1 hour.

DO NOT get ripped off by a Dealership or listen to their lies. When I bought my 2004 Corollo, just for fun I asked the sales manager when I should change the timing chain. He said 60k. LOL.....too funny


The timing "chain" should last the lifetime of the engine unlike a timing "belt" with needs to be changed every 60,000 miles or so.


Toyota recomends service at 110K miles. It's still a interferance engine and while chains do last longer then a belt, it is still a service item and they still use some sort of auto tentioner that is also a wear item. They WILL fail at some point. You could probabaly go 150-200K miles before a acaul failure, but anything over 110K miles is on borowed time and a risk.


I would disagree with that. today's timing belts will probably last 110k and then break with little warning. A timing chain will last significantly longer and then it will get real noisy for a long time before it goes and you should hear it if there is a tensioner problem.

#19 Bikeman982

Bikeman982

    Bikeman982

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,211 posts

Posted 27 February 2006 - 12:19 AM

Before any timing chain breaks it should make a lot of noise and sound like something is wrong, before it breaks. Most chains will last many miles and they don't usually break but stretch a little as a result of normal use. Consult your maintenance manual for the frequency of when it should be changed and it will give you a good idea of when to expect some work to be needed on it, although there is a margin of safety built into the schedule. Hope this helps.

Edited by Bikeman982, 27 February 2006 - 12:20 AM.

#20 gvr4ever

gvr4ever

    5th Gear

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,078 posts

Posted 27 February 2006 - 11:50 AM

[quote name='enotoga' post='123632' date='Feb 26 2006, 06:47 PM'][/quote]
I would disagree with that. today's timing belts will probably last 110k and then break with little warning. A timing chain will last significantly longer and then it will get real noisy for a long time before it goes and you should hear it if there is a tensioner problem.
[/quote]


Not sure why you disagree because Toyota recomends a timming chain change at 110K. Why do you think that todays timming belts will last at least 110K? What information are you baseing that on? A lot of cars with a timming belt are due at 60K and I know a lot of poor folks who didn't change them and had them break around 75K miles. It's rare, but they can break very close to 60K miles too. I belive my CRX had a 90K t-belt change.

Timming chains will not generaly break, and they do strech (as does a timming belt before it brakes) and the auto tentioner will pick up any slack. The auto tentioner can get weak over time and the chain can keep streatching.

110K miles would be a good time to change the chain, tentioner, any pullys, and the water pump. If you put that off, you are putting the engine at risk. 150K would probably be safe too, but anything over that is going to be a greater risk every time you drive it. The chain will probably never give, but the auto tentioner will at some point. You can't just drive your car in to the ground and expect that a wear item like the auto tentioner will never fail. All mechanical parts wear over time and trusting a timming chain setup to never fail is foolish. 110-150K miles is a long time. It's expected to have a big list of upkeeps right around this milage.

#21 BobLevine

BobLevine

    5th Gear

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,278 posts

Posted 27 February 2006 - 03:35 PM

I didn't see a timing chain replacement in my 2003 owner's manual.

Normally timing chains are changed only when an engine gets an overhaul .

#22 bhp02

bhp02

    4th Gear

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 860 posts

Posted 28 February 2006 - 03:58 PM

[quote name='gvr4ever' post='123678' date='Feb 27 2006, 11:50 AM'][quote name='enotoga' post='123632' date='Feb 26 2006, 06:47 PM'][/quote]
I would disagree with that. today's timing belts will probably last 110k and then break with little warning. A timing chain will last significantly longer and then it will get real noisy for a long time before it goes and you should hear it if there is a tensioner problem.
[/quote]


Not sure why you disagree because Toyota recomends a timming chain change at 110K. Why do you think that todays timming belts will last at least 110K? What information are you baseing that on? A lot of cars with a timming belt are due at 60K and I know a lot of poor folks who didn't change them and had them break around 75K miles. It's rare, but they can break very close to 60K miles too. I belive my CRX had a 90K t-belt change.

Timming chains will not generaly break, and they do strech (as does a timming belt before it brakes) and the auto tentioner will pick up any slack. The auto tentioner can get weak over time and the chain can keep streatching.

110K miles would be a good time to change the chain, tentioner, any pullys, and the water pump. If you put that off, you are putting the engine at risk. 150K would probably be safe too, but anything over that is going to be a greater risk every time you drive it. The chain will probably never give, but the auto tentioner will at some point. You can't just drive your car in to the ground and expect that a wear item like the auto tentioner will never fail. All mechanical parts wear over time and trusting a timming chain setup to never fail is foolish. 110-150K miles is a long time. It's expected to have a big list of upkeeps right around this milage.
[/quote]


I've seen alot of corollas go past 150k without changing the water pump.

#23 the99contour

the99contour

    5th Gear

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,485 posts

Posted 01 March 2006 - 05:57 PM

Here is what Toyota says should be done to your car:

Replace engine oil and oil filter
Rotate tires
Replace cabin air filter (if equipped)
Replace engine air filter
Inspect the following:
Ball joints and dust covers
Brake lines and hoses
Brake linings/drums and brake pads/discs 3
Differential oil
Drive shaft boots
Engine coolant
Exhaust pipes and mountings
Fuel lines and connections, fuel tank band and fuel tank vapor vent system hoses
Fuel tank cap gasket
Radiator core and condenser
Steering gear box
Steering linkage and boots
Transmission fluid or oil

The dealer won't do anything under the inspect list other than the really easy stuff. This service isn't worth more than $200 IMHO.

Whoever said that a Corolla requires a timing chain change at 110,000 either doesn't know what they are talking about or hasn't read. I checked every service required in my manual for my 2005 from 30k to the end and nowhere does it mention anything, not one word about replacing, tightening, or inspecting the timing chain. A timing chain is a lifetime of the car part, unlike a timing belt. Over the car's lifespan, the timing chain nor the tensioner should fail to operate within acceptable levels. That is why Toyota went to chains on their most popular engines. It reduces maintenence costs, improves reliability, and gives customers an extra peace of mind.

Edited by the99contour, 01 March 2006 - 06:04 PM.

#24 Gliebster

Gliebster

    Neutral

  • Members
  • 2 posts

Posted 23 February 2007 - 12:12 PM

My dealer (Mossy Toyota, San Diego) told me $290 and 3 - 4 hours for the 30K service on my 05 Corolla. They told me what the manual requires + coolant + transmission fluid + the other usual stuff (and a "free" pathetic carwash). Probably too much but at least they don't try to rip me off with a bunch of crap nobody needs done a 30K on a Corolla. I can't believe some dealers actually dare to charge $500 for this.

#25 bhp02

bhp02

    4th Gear

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 860 posts

Posted 23 February 2007 - 05:43 PM

save money , do it yourself, most dealerships do crappy job, they other hire cheap help or
the experienced trained mechanic rushes through them like making pancakes and
quality is less than desired.

Bring the hard stuff that you can't absolutely do yourself to a good mechanic.

#26 Gliebster

Gliebster

    Neutral

  • Members
  • 2 posts

Posted 24 February 2007 - 11:52 AM

The 30K service at Mossy actually turned out to be $259 + free rental car (their new shuttle policy now excludes us by distance and pickup!) + $12 insurance. The rental was a Mazda5. Three rows of seats and neat sport-shifter but needs more juice. I suppose it's sort of like if a Mazda3 crossed with a minivan. It rides high.

"Bring the hard stuff that you can't absolutely do yourself to a good mechanic."

I'm one of those guys who lives without a garage/driveway that doesn't have tools or any experience working on cars aside from wiper fluid + blades. I don't mind paying a little "too much" to save time and trouble. If it takes them 2 hours it'd take me 2 weeks. ;) But it is troubling to me if a dealer does a crappy job... I wouldn't know how to tell.

How do you recommend a non-mechanical person learn to do these things?

#27 tigrpal

tigrpal

    1st Gear

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 14 posts

Posted 24 February 2007 - 01:59 PM

[/quote]
How do you recommend a non-mechanical person learn to do these things?
[/quote]

I always purchase a repair manual, like Haynes or Chilton's. They are not perfect, but they give me an idea of what I am capable of doing and what I need to take it to a professional for. When I do take it to a mechanic, then I can talk intelligently about what needs to be done.

#28 Bikeman982

Bikeman982

    Bikeman982

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,211 posts

Posted 26 February 2007 - 01:17 AM

I recommend you get a knowledgable friend to do the work for you (and you can watch and help).
I would gladly help someone learn to do the items themselves, rather than take a chance or pay the higher dealer costs.