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Towing With Corolla


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#1 cooljw

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 02:00 PM

I have a 2005 Corolla S. I'd like to attached a towing hitch so that I can pull around a trailer for moving. Anyone have recommendations or tips on where to start? Where should I buy the hitch, is it hard to install?

#2 Max

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 03:15 PM

Hey cool- there have been quite a few threads about this. You may want to use the search function for info to add to any replies you get here.

#3 Bodhisattva

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 04:46 PM

I wouldn't do it. I don't know what the towing capacity is for a Corolla, but I would believe that it's not very much.

If you do, have a transmission fluid cooler installed and don't exceed 3000 lbs., trailer weight included. The engine in that '05 probably isn't more than 150 horsepower and likely doesn't have much torque, since it wasn't designed to pull the kind of loads best suited for a truck.

At best, you might be able to pull a single jet-ski or a small pop-up camper with it. Since you're planning to use it for a workhorse, I think you'd be better off renting a van with the money you'll spend outfitting your Corolla for towing.

My $0.02

#4 Slalom44

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 06:24 PM

http://www.corolland...showtopic=18403

http://www.corolland...showtopic=18474

These posts are from last month.

#5 cooljw

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 06:32 PM

Thanks, I read through those two threads. The search function wasn't working before but it is now!

Here's my story: I bought a house, and was seriously considering (reluctantly) selling my Corolla and getting a Toyota Tacoma pickup truck - for moving furniture, landscaping, etc... then I thought that if I had a trailer hitch and an open trailer I could keep the Corolla and also gain the functionality of a pickup truck!

A bolt-on hitch is around $100 and Uhaul rents trailers for $10/day. Heck with a few furniture moves, it would only take avoiding a few $50 delivery charges to make my money back.

What do you guys think, suggestions? Feedback?

#6 Bodhisattva

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 09:19 PM

Remember that the trailer tongue will lower your rear end, and even more when it's loaded. To my knowledge they don't make adjustable rear struts that you can inflate to level it, like you could with air shocks. Dips in the road and potholes will make the bottom scrape, it's inevitable.

It's totally up to you, but I'd advise against outrigging the Corolla for towing. If your plans call for hauling/towing on a routine basis I'd seriously consider trading up to a truck and absorb the higher payments. Avoid the grief that would come from premature engine/transmission/suspension failures that could cost you later.

#7 euzeka

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 10:00 PM

It's totally up to you, but I'd advise against outrigging the Corolla for towing. If your plans call for hauling/towing on a routine basis I'd seriously consider trading up to a truck and absorb the higher payments. Avoid the grief that would come from premature engine/transmission/suspension failures that could cost you later.

Even if you end up putting 2000$ of repairs on the corolla a few years later, it's still going to be way cheaper than replacing it with a truck. Besides, that trailer shouldn't cause your rear end to bottom out because you're not supposed to put that much weight on the tongue. The new corollas are rated to tow up to 1500 lbs which means about 150 lbs on the car... not much worse than putting a dead body in the trunk :P Just don't tow with 5 people in the car and a loaded trunk and it'll be fine. Also be gentle on the brakes.

#8 stubborn1

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 10:12 PM

I would not recommend towing anything bigger than a 4'x8' utility trailer. Make sure to watch the tongue weight to avoid damaging the suspension. Also, remember the 1500 pound cargo capacity includes the weight of the trailer.

Personnally, I won't buy a small vehicle if i see a trailer hitch was installed. I don't know how the previous owner treated the vehicle while towing, because many people over do it.

#9 Bikeman982

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 10:41 PM

I have already put a hitch on my 1993 Corolla and think it is a good idea, providing you don't tow anything either heavy or far. I think a small utility trailer for a short distance would be fine. It will probably put more wear and tear on the car but if done cautiously can be effective. Whatever it costs for the hitch and possibly some repairs would be a pittance in comparison to purchasing a new truck.

#10 Cherry128

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 11:56 PM

See other posts...

It's rated for 1500lbs. 1000lbs is perfectly fine in all conditions. As with any trailer, make sure you have at least 10% tongue weight. The rear suspension is fine even with 1500lbs. On a modern car modifying the rear suspension for towing is idiotic... this isn't a 1980 Chevy Caprice.

You can purchase a bolt on Class I hitch for aroun
$80-100. A wiring kit can be found at any hardware store, Walmart or AutoZone for around $20. The wiring is pretty straight forward... easier with a voltmeter to identify the wires. As a novice DIY... figure 1 hour to install the hitch... 1 hour for the wiring.

Remember 3 additonal adults and luggage can easily weigh 700+ lbs, so 1 person and a 1000lbs trailer is not that far off.

#11 Bodhisattva

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Posted 23 February 2006 - 01:42 PM

2006 Corolla S, A/T or manual, base MSRP = $15,150
2006 Tacoma Reg. cab A/T base MSRP = $14,880

Looks like the Tacoma is cheaper to me. Granted, I used a base model regular cab for comparison, but utility is the name of the game and nothing was ever said about a need for passengers.

JMO, if hauling/towing are to become routine demands I'd opt for getting the truck.

#12 Bikeman982

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Posted 23 February 2006 - 09:55 PM

2006 Corolla S, A/T or manual, base MSRP = $15,150
2006 Tacoma Reg. cab A/T base MSRP = $14,880

Looks like the Tacoma is cheaper to me. Granted, I used a base model regular cab for comparison, but utility is the name of the game and nothing was ever said about a need for passengers.

JMO, if hauling/towing are to become routine demands I'd opt for getting the truck.

I think the question is whether or not to purchase a new truck to tow with or repair/replace whatever goes wrong with his already owned Corolla after it is modified with towing ability. The question is not what to purchase and what the difference is in their price. The Corolla is already owned and if there was to be only one vehicle, it would have to be traded or sold for the new truck purchase. The Corolla is depreciating daily and the original purchase price will never be recovered. The new truck would cost more than the Corolla modification (even using the Corolla as trade-in) than using the Corolla to tow.

Edited by Bikeman982, 23 February 2006 - 09:57 PM.

#13 friendly_jacek

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Posted 24 February 2006 - 09:48 AM

It boils down to how often and how much he wants to tow. If only occasionally and under 1000-1500 lbs, no major harm. Investing in AT cooler would be advisable in hot climate though.
Contrary to what most people in US think, one does not have to have a truck to haul things around.

#14 Bikeman982

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Posted 24 February 2006 - 08:39 PM

It boils down to how often and how much he wants to tow. If only occasionally and under 1000-1500 lbs, no major harm. Investing in AT cooler would be advisable in hot climate though.
Contrary to what most people in US think, one does not have to have a truck to haul things around.

That is very true. It is certainly better to be set up for an occassional tow than not to have any tow capability at all. Trucks are not the only tow vehicles, especially light utility trailers.

#15 00owner

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Posted 26 February 2006 - 08:39 AM

I agree totally I use my small utility trailer all the time,taking care not overload it and the car.Why buy a truck when you are only going to use it for
occasional hauling. Trucks are just a waster of fuel unless they are used for there intended purpose. This is my opinion many will disagree.

Andrew